HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

Gross Value Added
In economics, Gross value added (GVA) is the measure of the value of goods and services produced in an area, industry or sector of an economy. In national accounts GVA is output minus intermediate consumption;[1] it is a balancing item of the national accounts' production account.[2] Relationship to gross domestic product[edit] GVA is linked as a measurement to gross domestic product (gdp), as both are measures of output. The relationship is defined as:GVA + taxes on products - subsidies on products = GDPAs the total aggregates of taxes on products and subsidies on products are only available at whole economy level,[3] Gross value added is used for measuring gross regional domestic product and other measures of the output of entities smaller than a whole economy
[...More...]

"Gross Value Added" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Economics
Economics
Economics
(/ɛkəˈnɒmɪks, iːkə-/)[1][2][3] is the social science that studies the production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services.[4] Economics
Economics
focuses on the behaviour and interactions of economic agents and how economies work. Microeconomics
Microeconomics
analyzes basic elements in the economy, including individual agents and markets, their interactions, and the outcomes of interactions. Individual agents may include, for example, households, firms, buyers, and sellers. Macroeconomics analyzes the entire economy (meaning aggregated production, consumption, savings, and investment) and issues affecting it, including unemployment of resources (labour, capital, and land), inflation, economic growth, and the public policies that address these issues (monetary, fiscal, and other policies)
[...More...]

"Economics" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Goods
In economics, goods are materials that satisfy human wants[1] and provide utility, for example, to a consumer making a purchase of a satisfying product. A common distinction is made between goods that are tangible property, and services, which are non-Physical.[2] A good may be a consumable item that is useful to people but scarce in relation to its demand, so that human effort is required to obtain it. In contrast, free goods, such as air, are naturally in abundant supply and need no conscious effort to obtain them. Personal goods are things such as televisions, living room furniture, wallets, cellular telephones, almost anything owned or used on a daily basis that is not food related. Commercial goods are construed as any tangible product that is manufactured and then made available for supply to be used in an industry of commerce. Commercial goods could be tractors, commercial vehicles, mobile structures, airplanes and even roofing materials
[...More...]

"Goods" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garb
[...More...]

"Special" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Office For National Statistics
The Office for National Statistics
Statistics
(ONS) is the executive office of the UK Statistics
Statistics
Authority, a non-ministerial department which reports directly to the UK Parliament.Contents1 Overview 2 History 3 Purpose and scope3.1 Applications of data4 Independence 5 Heads of the Office and the National Statistician 6 Work of the ONS6.1 Data collection 6.2 Former departments 6.3 The Blue Book 6.4 Education of Statisticians 6.5 Virtual Microdata Laboratory7 Office Locations7.1 Former Headquarters 7.2 Gradual move of functions to South Wales8 Criticism of the ONS 9 See also 10 References 11 External linksOverview[edit] It is charged with the collection and publication of statistics related to the economy, population and society of the UK; responsibility for some areas of statistics in Scotland, Northern Ireland and Wales is devolved to the devolved governments for those areas
[...More...]

"Office For National Statistics" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Measures Of National Income And Output
A variety of measures of national income and output are used in economics to estimate total economic activity in a country or region, including gross domestic product (GDP), gross national product (GNP), net national income (NNI), and adjusted national income (NNI* adjusted for natural resource depletion). All are specially concerned with counting the total amount of goods and services produced within some the economy and by different sectors. The boundary is usually defined by geography or citizenship, and may also restrict the goods and services that are counted. For instance, some measures count only goods & services that are exchanged for money, excluding bartered goods, while other measures may attempt to include bartered goods by imputing monetary values to them
[...More...]

"Measures Of National Income And Output" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Gross Profit
In accounting, gross profit, gross margin, sales profit, or credit sales is the difference between revenue and the cost of making a product or providing a service, before deducting overheads, payroll, taxation, and interest payments. This is different from operating profit (earnings before interest and taxes)
[...More...]

"Gross Profit" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Subsidy
A subsidy is a form of financial aid or support extended to an economic sector (or institution, business, or individual) generally with the aim of promoting economic and social policy.[1] Although commonly extended from government, the term subsidy can relate to any type of support – for example from NGOs or as implicit subsidies. Subsidies come in various forms including: direct (cash grants, interest-free loans) and indirect (tax breaks, insurance, low-interest loans, accelerated depreciation, rent rebates).[2][3] Furthermore, they can be broad or narrow, legal or illegal, ethical or unethical. The most common forms of subsidies are those to the producer or the consumer. Producer/production subsidies ensure producers are better off by either supplying market price support, direct support, or payments to factors of production.[4] Consumer/consumption subsidies commonly reduce the price of goods and services to the consumer
[...More...]

"Subsidy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Tax
A tax (from the Latin
Latin
taxo) is a mandatory financial charge or some other type of levy imposed upon a taxpayer (an individual or other legal entity) by a governmental organization in order to fund various public expenditures.[1] A failure to pay, or evasion of or resistance to taxation, is punishable by law. Taxes consist of direct or indirect taxes and may be paid in money or as its labour equivalent. Most countries have a tax system in place to pay for public/common/agreed national needs and government functions: some levy a flat percentage rate of taxation on personal annual income, some on a scale based on annual income amounts, and some countries impose almost no taxation at all, or a very low tax rate for a certain area of taxation
[...More...]

"Tax" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Output (economics)
Output in economics is the "quantity of goods or services produced in a given time period, by a firm, industry, or country",[1] whether consumed or used for further production.[2] The concept of national output is essential in the field of macroeconomics. It is national output that makes a country rich, not large amounts of money
[...More...]

"Output (economics)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

National Income And Product Accounts
The national income and product accounts (NIPA) are part of the national accounts of the United States. They are produced by the Bureau of Economic Analysis of the Department of Commerce. They are one of the main sources of data on general economic activity in the United States. They use double-entry accounting to report the monetary value and sources of output produced in the country and the distribution of incomes that production generates. Data are available at the national and industry levels. Seven summary accounts are published, as well as a much larger number of more specific accounts. The first summary account shows gross domestic product (GDP) and its major components. The table summarizes national income on the left (debit, revenue) side and national product on the right (credit, expense) side of a two-column accounting report. Thus the left side gives GDP by the income method, and the right side gives GDP by the expenditure method
[...More...]

"National Income And Product Accounts" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Intermediate Consumption
Intermediate consumption (also called "intermediate expenditure") is an economic concept used in national accounts, such as the United Nations System of National Accounts (UNSNA), the US National Income and Product Accounts (NIPA) and the European System of Accounts (ESA). Conceptually, the aggregate "intermediate consumption" is equal to the amount of the difference between gross output (roughly, the total sales value) and net output (gross value added or GDP). In the US economy, total intermediate consumption represents about 45% of Gross Output
[...More...]

"Intermediate Consumption" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

National Accounts
National accounts
National accounts
or national account systems (NAS) are the implementation of complete and consistent accounting techniques for measuring the economic activity of a nation. These include detailed underlying measures that rely on double-entry accounting. By design, such accounting makes the totals on both sides of an account equal even though they each measure different characteristics, for example production and the income from it
[...More...]

"National Accounts" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Economy
An economy (from Greek οίκος – "household" and νέμoμαι – "manage") is an area of the production, distribution, or trade[1], and consumption of goods and services by different agents. Understood in its broadest sense, 'The economy is defined as a social domain that emphasizes the practices, discourses, and material expressions associated with the production, use, and management of resources'.[2] Economic agents can be individuals, businesses, organizations, or governments. Economic transactions occur when two parties agree to the value or price of the transacted good or service, commonly expressed in a certain currency. However, monetary transactions only account for a small part of the economic domain. Economic activity is spurred by production which uses natural resources, labor, and capital
[...More...]

"Economy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Service (economics)
In economics, a service is a transaction in which no physical goods are transferred from the seller to the buyer. The benefits of such a service are held to be demonstrated by the buyer's willingness to make the exchange. Public services are those that society (nation state, fiscal union, region) as a whole pays for. Using resources, skill, ingenuity, and experience, service providers benefit service consumers.Contents1 Five I's1.1 Intangibility 1.2 Inconsistency (variability) 1.3 Involvement2 Service quality 3 Specification 4 Delivery 5 Service-commodity goods continuum 6 Service types 7 List of countries by tertiary output 8 See also 9 ReferencesFive I's[edit] Services can be described in terms of I's. Intangibility[edit] Services are by definition intangible. They are not manufactured, transported or stocked. It is used in marketing to describe the inability to assess the value gained from an activity using any tangible e Services cannot be stored for a future use
[...More...]

"Service (economics)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Value Added
In business, the difference between the sale price and the production cost of a product is the unit profit. In economics, the sum of the unit profit, the unit depreciation cost, and the unit labor cost is the unit value added. Summing value added per unit over all units sold is total value added. Total value added is equivalent to revenue less intermediate consumption. Value added is a higher portion of revenue for integrated companies, e.g., manufacturing companies, and a lower portion of revenue for less integrated companies, e.g., retail companies. Total value added is very closely approximated by compensation of employees plus earnings before taxes. The first component is a return to labor and the second component is a return to capital
[...More...]

"Value Added" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.