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Grigory Barenblatt
Grigory Isaakovich Barenblatt (Russian: Григо́рий Исаа́кович Баренблат; born July 10, 1927) is a Russian mathematician.Contents1 Education 2 Career and research 3 Awards and honors 4 References 5 External linksEducation[edit] He graduated in 1950 from Moscow
Moscow
State University,[1] Department of Mechanics
Mechanics
and Mathematics. He received his Ph.D. in 1953 from Moscow State University under the supervision of A. N. Kolmogorov.[1][2] Career and research[edit] He also received a D.Sc. from Moscow
Moscow
State University in 1957.[1] He is an emeritus Professor in Residence at the Department of Mathematics of the University of California, Berkeley[3] and Mathematician
Mathematician
at Department of Mathematics, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.[3] He was G. I
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Moscow
Moscow
Moscow
(/ˈmɒskoʊ, -kaʊ/; Russian: Москва́, tr. Moskva, IPA: [mɐˈskva] ( listen)) is the capital and most populous city of Russia, with 12.2 million residents within the city limits[11] and 17.1 million within the urban area.[12] Moscow
Moscow
is recognized as a Russian federal city. Moscow
Moscow
is a major political, economic, cultural, and scientific centre of Russia
Russia
and Eastern Europe, as well as the largest city entirely on the European continent. By broader definitions Moscow
Moscow
is among the world's largest cities, being the 14th largest metro area, the 18th largest agglomeration, the 15th largest urban area, and the 11th largest by population within city limits worldwide
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Miller Institute
The Miller Institute for Basic Research in Science was established on the University of California, Berkeley
University of California, Berkeley
campus in 1955 after Adolph C. Miller and his wife, Mary Sprague Miller, made a donation to the University. It was their wish that the donation be used to establish an institute “dedicated to the encouragement of creative thought and conduct of pure science.” The Miller Institute sponsors Miller Research Professors, Visiting Miller Professors and Miller Research Fellows. The first appointments of Miller Professors were made in January 1957. In 2008 the Institute created the Miller Senior Fellow program. This program is aimed differently, but is still within the Institute's general purpose of supporting excellence in science at UC Berkeley
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Mechanics
Mechanics
Mechanics
(Greek μηχανική) is that area of science which is concerned with the behaviour of physical bodies when subjected to forces or displacements, and the subsequent effects of the bodies on their environment. The scientific discipline has its origins in Ancient Greece
Ancient Greece
with the writings of Aristotle
Aristotle
and Archimedes[1][2][3] (see History of classical mechanics
History of classical mechanics
and Timeline of classical mechanics). During the early modern period, scientists such as Galileo, Kepler, and Newton, laid the foundation for what is now known as classical mechanics. It is a branch of classical physics that deals with particles that are either at rest or are moving with velocities significantly less than the speed of light
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Solid
Solid
Solid
is one of the four fundamental states of matter (the others being liquid, gas, and plasma). In solids molecules are closely packed. It is characterized by structural rigidity and resistance to changes of shape or volume. Unlike a liquid, a solid object does not flow to take on the shape of its container, nor does it expand to fill the entire volume available to it like a gas does. The atoms in a solid are tightly bound to each other, either in a regular geometric lattice (crystalline solids, which include metals and ordinary ice) or irregularly (an amorphous solid such as common window glass). Solids cannot be compressed with little pressure whereas gases can be compressed with little pressure because in gases molecules are loosely packed. The branch of physics that deals with solids is called solid-state physics, and is the main branch of condensed matter physics (which also includes liquids)
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Turbulence
Turbulence
Turbulence
or turbulent flow is a flow regime in fluid dynamics characterized by chaotic changes in pressure and flow velocity. It is in contrast to a laminar flow regime, which occurs when a fluid flows in parallel layers, with no disruption between those layers.[1] Turbulence
Turbulence
is commonly observed in everyday phenomena such as surf, fast flowing rivers, billowing storm clouds, or smoke from a chimney, and most fluid flows occurring in nature and created in engineering applications are turbulent.[2][3]:2 Turbulence
Turbulence
is caused by excessive kinetic energy in parts of a fluid flow, which overcomes the damping effect of the fluid's viscosity. For this reason turbulence is easier to create in low viscosity fluids, but more difficult in highly viscous fluids
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Moscow State University
Lomonosov Moscow
Moscow
State University
University
(MSU; Russian: Московский государственный университет имени М. В. Ломоносова, often abbreviated МГУ) is a coeducational and public research university located in Moscow, Russia. It was founded on January 25, 1755 by Mikhail Lomonosov. MSU was renamed after Lomonosov in 1940 and was then known as Lomonosov University. It also houses the tallest educational building in the world.[2] Its current rector is Viktor Sadovnichiy
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American Academy Of Arts And Sciences
Coordinates: 42°22′51″N 71°06′37″W / 42.380755°N 71.110256°W / 42.380755; -71.110256American Academy of Arts and Sciences American Academy of Arts and Sciences
American Academy of Arts and Sciences
logoMotto To cultivate every art and science which may tend to advance the interest, honour, dignity, and happiness of a free, independent, and virtuous people.Formation May 4, 1780 (1780-05-04)Type Honorary society and center for policy researchPurpose Honoring excellence and providing service to the nation and the worldHeadquarters Cambridge, Massachusetts, U.S.Membership4,900 fellows and 600 foreign honorary membersWebsite www.amacad.orgThe House of the Academy, Cambridge, MassachusettsThe American Academy of Arts and Sciences
American Academy of Arts and Sciences
is one of the oldest learned societies in the United States of America
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National Academy Of Engineering
The National Academy of Engineering
Engineering
(NAE) is an American nonprofit, non-governmental organization. The National Academy of Engineering
Engineering
is part of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, along with the National Academy of Sciences
National Academy of Sciences
(NAS), the National Academy of Medicine, and the National Research Council. The NAE operates engineering programs aimed at meeting national needs, encourages education and research, and recognizes the superior achievements of engineers. New members are annually elected by current members, based on their distinguished and continuing achievements in original research
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Cambridge Philosophical Society
The Cambridge Philosophical Society (CPS) is a scientific society at the University of Cambridge. It was founded in 1819. The name derives from the medieval use of the word philosophy to denote any research undertaken outside the fields of theology and medicine
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United States National Academy Of Sciences
The National Academy of Sciences
National Academy of Sciences
(NAS) is a United States
United States
nonprofit, non-governmental organization. NAS is part of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, along with the National Academy of Engineering
Engineering
(NAE) and the National Academy of Medicine (NAM). As a national academy, new members of the organization are elected annually by current members, based on their distinguished and continuing achievements in original research. Election to the National Academies is one of the highest honors in the scientific field. Members serve pro bono as "advisers to the nation" on science, engineering, and medicine
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Fluid Dynamics
In physics and engineering, fluid dynamics is a subdiscipline of fluid mechanics that describes the flow of fluids - liquids and gases. It has several subdisciplines, including aerodynamics (the study of air and other gases in motion) and hydrodynamics (the study of liquids in motion). Fluid dynamics has a wide range of applications, including calculating forces and moments on aircraft, determining the mass flow rate of petroleum through pipelines, predicting weather patterns, understanding nebulae in interstellar space and modelling fission weapon detonation. Fluid dynamics offers a systematic structure—which underlies these practical disciplines—that embraces empirical and semi-empirical laws derived from flow measurement and used to solve practical problems
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G. I. Taylor
Sir Geoffrey Ingram Taylor OM (7 March 1886 – 27 June 1975) was a British physicist and mathematician, and a major figure in fluid dynamics and wave theory. His biographer and one-time student, George Batchelor, described him as "one of the most notable scientists of this (the 20th) century".[4][5][6][7]Contents1 Early life and education 2 Career and research2.1 Manhattan Project 2.2 Later life3 Personal life 4 References 5 External linksEarly life and education[edit] Taylor was born in St. John's Wood, London. His father, Edward Ingram Taylor, was an artist, and his mother, Margaret Boole, came from a family of mathematicians (his aunt was Alicia Boole Stott and his grandfather was George Boole). As a child he was fascinated by science after attending the Royal Institution Christmas Lectures, and performed experiments using paint rollers and sticky-tape. Taylor read mathematics and physics at Trinity College, Cambridge from 1905 to 1908
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J. C. Maxwell
James Clerk Maxwell
James Clerk Maxwell
FRS FRSE (/ˈmækswɛl/;[2] 13 June 1831 – 5 November 1879) was a Scottish[3][4] scientist in the field of mathematical physics.[5] His most notable achievement was to formulate the classical theory of electromagnetic radiation, bringing together for the first time electricity, magnetism, and light as different manifestations of the same phenomenon. Maxwell's equations
Maxwell's equations
for electromagnetism have been called the "second great unification in physics"[6] after the first one realised by Isaac Newton. With the publication of "A Dynamical Theory of the Electromagnetic Field" in 1865, Maxwell demonstrated that electric and magnetic fields travel through space as waves moving at the speed of light
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Royal Society Of London
The President, Council and Fellows of the Royal Society
Royal Society
of London for Improving Natural Knowledge,[1] commonly known as the Royal Society, is a learned society. Founded in November 1660, it was granted a royal charter by King Charles II as "The Royal Society".[1] It is the oldest national scientific institution in the world.[2] The society is the United Kingdom's and Commonwealth of Nations' Academy of Sciences
Academy of Sciences
and fulfils a number of roles: promoting science and its benefits, recognising excellence in science, supporting outstanding science, providing scientific advice for policy, fostering international and global co-operation, education and public engagement. The society is governed by its Council, which is chaired by the Society's President, according to a set of statutes and standing orders
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American Society Of Mechanical Engineers
The American Society of Mechanical Engineers
American Society of Mechanical Engineers
(ASME) is a professional association that, in its own words, "promotes the art, science, and practice of multidisciplinary engineering and allied sciences around the globe" via "continuing education, training and professional development, codes and standards, research, conferences and publications, government relations, and other forms of outreach."[1] ASME
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