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Gregory Nazianzen
Gregory of Nazianzus (Greek: Γρηγόριος ὁ Ναζιανζηνός Grēgorios ho Nazianzēnos; c. 329[2] – 25 January 390[2][3]), also known as Gregory the Theologian
Theologian
or Gregory Nazianzen, was a 4th-century Archbishop of Constantinople, and theologian. He is widely considered the most accomplished rhetorical stylist of the patristic age.[4] As a classically trained orator and philosopher he infused Hellenism into the early church, establishing the paradigm of Byzantine theologians and church officials.[4] Gregory made a significant impact on the shape of Trinitarian theology among both Greek- and Latin-speaking theologians, and he is remembered as the "Trinitarian Theologian". Much of his theological work continues to influence modern theologians, especially in regard to the relationship among the three Persons of the Trinity
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Gregory Of Nazianzus The Elder
Gregory the Elder, or Gregory of Nazianzus the Elder, (c. 276 – 374) was the bishop of the see of Nazianzus in Roman province of Cappadocia. However, he is better remembered as the patriarch of an important family of ecclesiastics.Contents1 Career 2 Family 3 References 4 External linksCareer[edit] A member of the Hypsistarians, a distinct Jewish-pagan sect worshiping Hypsistos, the "Most High" God, Gregory was convinced to convert to Christianity by his wife Nonna in 325. Both Gregory and Nonna came from wealthy families, and Gregory was able to personally finance the construction of a church in the region. In 328, Gregory was selected as bishop of Nazianzus, a position he held until his death. At one point, Gregory subscribed to an Arian understanding of the Trinity. However, this was for a very brief time and he quickly renounced that position.[2] Family[edit]This section needs additional citations for verification
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History Of Eastern Orthodox Christian Theology
A Christian
Christian
(/ˈkrɪstʃən, -tiən/ ( listen)) is a person who follows or adheres to Christianity, an Abrahamic, monotheistic religion based on the life and teachings of Jesus
Jesus
Christ
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Vestments
Vestments are liturgical garments and articles associated primarily with the Christian religion, especially among the Eastern Orthodox, Catholics ( Latin Church
Latin Church
and others), Anglicans, and Lutherans
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Bishop
A bishop (English derivation[a][1][2][3] from the New Testament
New Testament
of the Christian Bible Greek ἐπίσκοπος, epískopos, "overseer", "guardian") is an ordained, consecrated, or appointed member of the Christian clergy who is generally entrusted with a position of authority and oversight. Within the Catholic
Catholic
Church, Eastern Orthodox, Oriental Orthodox, Anglican, Old Catholic
Old Catholic
and Independent Catholic churches
Independent Catholic churches
and in the Assyrian Church of the East, bishops claim apostolic succession, a direct historical lineage dating back to the original Twelve Apostles. Within these churches, bishops are seen as those who possess the full priesthood and can ordain clergy – including another bishop
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Omophorion
In the Eastern Orthodox and Eastern Catholic liturgical tradition, the omophorion (Greek: ὠμοφόριον, meaning "[something] borne on the shoulders"; Slavonic: омофоръ, omofor) is the distinguishing vestment of a bishop and the symbol of his spiritual and ecclesiastical authority
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Gospel Book
The Gospel
Gospel
Book, Evangelion, or Book of the Gospels (Greek: Εὐαγγέλιον, Evangélion) is a codex or bound volume containing one or more of the four Gospels of the Christian
Christian
New Testament – normally all four – centering on the life of Jesus of Nazareth and the roots of the Christian
Christian
faith. The term is also used of the liturgical book, also called the Evangeliary, from which are read the portions of the Gospels used in the Mass and other services, arranged according to the order of the liturgical calendar.[1] Liturgical use in churches of a distinct Gospel
Gospel
book remains normal, often compulsory, in Eastern Christianity, and very common in Roman Catholicism and some parts of Anglicanism
Anglicanism
and Lutheranism
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Scroll
A scroll (from the Old French escroe or escroue), also known as a roll, is a roll of papyrus, parchment, or paper containing writing.[1]Contents1 Structure 2 History of scroll use 3 Rolls 4 Scotland 5 Replacement by the codex 6 Recent discovery 7 Modern technology 8 See also 9 References 10 External linksStructure[edit] A scroll is usually divided up into pages, which are sometimes separate sheets of papyrus or parchment glued together at the edges, or may be marked divisions of a continuous roll of writing material. The scroll is usually unrolled so that one page is exposed at a time, for writing or reading, with the remaining pages rolled up to the left and right of the visible page
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Iconography
Iconography, as a branch of art history, studies the identification, description, and the interpretation of the content of images: the subjects depicted, the particular compositions and details used to do so, and other elements that are distinct from artistic style. The word iconography comes from the Greek εἰκών ("image") and γράφειν ("to write"). A secondary meaning (based on a non-standard translation of the Greek and Russian equivalent terms) is the production of religious images, called "icons", in the Byzantine and Orthodox Christian tradition; see Icon. In art history, "an iconography" may also mean a particular depiction of a subject in terms of the content of the image, such as the number of figures used, their placing and gestures. The term is also used in many academic fields other than art history, for example semiotics and media studies, and in general usage, for the content of images, the typical depiction in images of a subject, and related senses
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Christ Pantocrator
In Christian iconography, Christ Pantocrator
Christ Pantocrator
is a specific depiction of Christ. Pantocrator or Pantokrator (Greek: Χριστὸς Παντοκράτωρ)[1] is, used in this context, a translation of one of many names of God
God
in Judaism. When the Hebrew Bible
Hebrew Bible
was translated into Greek as the Septuagint, Pantokrator was used both for YHWH Sabaoth "Lord of Hosts"[2] and for El Shaddai " God
God
Almighty".[3] In the New Testament, Pantokrator is used once by Paul (2 Cor 6:18) and nine times in the Book of Revelation: 1:8, 4:8, 11:17, 15:3, 16:7, 16:14, 19:6, 19:15, and 21:22
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Hagia Sophia
Hagia Sophia
Hagia Sophia
(/ˈhɑːɡiə soʊˈfiːə/; from the Greek: Αγία Σοφία, pronounced [aˈʝia soˈfia], "Holy Wisdom"; Latin: Sancta Sophia or Sancta Sapientia; Turkish: Ayasofya) was a Greek Orthodox Christian
Christian
patriarchal basilica (church), later an imperial mosque, and is now a museum (Ayasofya Müzesi) in Istanbul, Turkey. From the date of its construction in 537 AD, and until 1453, it served as an Eastern Orthodox cathedral and seat of the Patriarch
Patriarch
of Constantinople,[1] except between 1204 and 1261, when it was converted by the Fourth Crusaders to a Roman Catholic cathedral under the Latin Empire. The building was later converted into an Ottoman mosque from 29 May 1453 until 1931
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Eastern Orthodox Church Organization
This article covers the organization of the Eastern Orthodox Churches rather than the doctrines, traditions, practices, or other aspects of Eastern Orthodoxy. Like the Catholic Church, the Eastern Orthodox Church claims to be the One, Holy, Catholic and Apostolic Church. The term Western Orthodoxy
Orthodoxy
is sometimes used to denominate what is technically a vicariate within the Antiochian Orthodox and the Russian Orthodox Churches and thus a part of the Eastern Orthodox Church
Eastern Orthodox Church
as that term is defined here. The term "Western Orthodox Church" is disfavored by members of that vicariate. In the 5th century, Oriental Orthodoxy
Oriental Orthodoxy
separated from Chalcedonian Christianity
Christianity
(and is therefore separate from both the Eastern Orthodox and Catholic Church), well before the 11th century Great Schism
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Eastern Orthodox Christian Theology
Eastern Orthodox theology
Eastern Orthodox theology
is the theology particular to the Eastern Orthodox Church (officially the Orthodox Catholic Church)
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Eastern Orthodox Worship
Eastern Orthodox worship
Eastern Orthodox worship
in this article is distinguished from Eastern Orthodox prayer in that 'worship' refers to the activity of the Christian Church
Christian Church
as a body offering up prayers to God
God
while 'prayer' refers to the individual devotional traditions of the Orthodox. The worship of the Orthodox Church is viewed as the Church's fundamental activity because the worship of God
God
is the joining of man to God
God
in prayer and that is the essential function of Christ's Church. The Orthodox view their Church as being the living embodiment of Christ, through the grace of His Holy Spirit, in the people, clergy, monks and all other members of the Church
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Evangelical Lutheran Church In America
The Evangelical Lutheran
Lutheran
Church in America (ELCA) is a mainline Protestant
Protestant
denomination headquartered in Chicago, Illinois. The ELCA officially came into existence on January 1, 1988, by the merging of three Lutheran
Lutheran
church bodies. As of 2016[update], it has approximately 3.6 million baptized members in just over 9,200 congregations.[4] In 2015, Pew Research estimated that 2.1% of the U.S
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History Of The Eastern Orthodox Church
The history of the Eastern Orthodox Church
Eastern Orthodox Church
is traced back to Jesus Christ and the Apostles. The Apostles
Apostles
appointed successors, known as bishops, and they in turn appointed other bishops in a process known as Apostolic succession. Over time, five Patriarchates
Patriarchates
were established to organize the Christian
Christian
world, and four of these ancient Patriarchates
Patriarchates
remain Orthodox today
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