HOME TheInfoList
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff







Greenwood Publishing Group
ABC-CLIO/Greenwood is an educational and academic publisher (middle school through university level) which is today part of ABC-CLIO. Established in 1967 as Greenwood Press, Inc. and based in Westport, Connecticut,[1] Greenwood Publishing Group, Inc. (GPG) publishes reference works under its Greenwood Press imprint, and scholarly, professional, and general interest books under its related imprint, Praeger Publishers (/ˈprɡər/). Also part of GPG is Libraries Unlimited, which publishes professional works for librarians and teachers.[2] The company was founded as Greenwood Press, Inc. in 1967 by Harold Mason, a librarian and antiquarian bookseller, and Harold Schwartz who had a background in trade publishing
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



CBS, Inc
CBS is an American commercial broadcast television and radio network owned by ViacomCBS through its CBS Entertainment Group division. The network is headquartered at the CBS Building in New York City, with major production facilities and operations in New York City (at the CBS Broadcast Center) and Los Angeles (at CBS Television City and the CBS Studio Center). The name "CBS" is an initialism of its former legal name that was used from 1928 to 1974, Columbia Broadcasting System. CBS is also sometimes referred to as the Eye Network, in reference to the company's trademark symbol, in use since 1951. It has also been called the "Tiffany Network", alluding to the perceived high quality of its programming during the tenure of William S
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

Publishers Weekly
Publishers Weekly (PW) is an American weekly trade news magazine targeted at publishers, librarians, booksellers, and literary agents. Published continuously since 1872, it has carried the tagline, "The International News Magazine of Book Publishing and Bookselling". With 51 issues a year, the emphasis today is on book reviews.[3] The magazine was founded by bibliographer Frederick Leypoldt in the late 1860s, and had various titles until Leypoldt settled on the name The Publishers' Weekly (with an apostrophe) in 1872. The publication was a compilation of information about newly published books, collected from publishers and from other sources by Leypoldt, for an audience of booksellers. By 1876, Publishers Weekly was being read by nine tenths of the booksellers in the country
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



Harcourt Education
Harcourt (/ˈhɑːrkɔːrt/) was an American publishing firm with a long history of publishing fiction and nonfiction for adults and children. The company was last based in San Diego, California, with editorial/sales/marketing/rights offices in New York City and Orlando, Florida, and was known at different stages in its history as Harcourt Brace, & Co. and Harcourt Brace Jovanovich. From 1919 to 1982, it was based in New York City.[1] Houghton Mifflin acquired Harcourt in 2007. It incorporated the Harcourt name to form Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. As of 2012, all Harcourt books that have been re-released are under the Houghton Mifflin Harcourt name
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]



picture info

CD-ROM
A CD-ROM (/ˌsdˈrɒm/, compact disc read-only memory) is a pre-pressed optical compact disc that contains data. Computers can read—but not write to or erase—CD-ROMs, i.e. it is a type of read-only memory. During the 1990s, CD-ROMs were popularly used to distribute software and data for computers and fifth generation video game consoles. Some CDs, called enhanced CDs, hold both computer data and audio with the latter capable of being played on a CD player, while data (such as software or digital video) is only usable on a computer (such as ISO 9660[1] format PC CD-ROMs). The earliest theoretical work on optical disc storage was done by independent researchers in the United States including David Paul Gregg (1958) and James Russel (1965-1975)
[...More Info...]      
[...Related Items...]