HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff

picture info

Greek Alphabet
The Greek alphabet
Greek alphabet
has been used to write the Greek language
Greek language
since the late 9th century BC or early 8th century BC.[3][4] It was derived from the earlier Phoenician alphabet,[5] and was the first alphabetic script to have distinct letters for vowels as well as consonants. It is the ancestor of the Latin and Cyrillic scripts.[6] Apart from its use in writing the Greek language, in both its ancient and its modern forms, the Greek alphabet
Greek alphabet
today also serves as a source of technical symbols and labels in many domains of mathematics, science and other fields. In its classical and modern forms, the alphabet has 24 letters, ordered from alpha to omega
[...More...]

picture info

Modern Era
Modern history, the modern period or the modern era, is the linear, global, historiographical approach to the time frame after post-classical history.[1][2] This view stands in contrast to the "organic," or non-linear, view of history first put forward by the renowned philosopher and historian, Oswald Spengler, early in the 20th century.[3] Modern history
Modern history
can be further broken down into periods :The early modern period began approximately in the early 16th century; notable historical milestones included the European Renaissance, the Age of Discovery, and the Protestant Reformation.[4][5] The late modern period began approximately in the mid-18th century; notable historical milestones included the French Revolution, the American Revolution, the Industrial Revolution, the Great Divergence, and the Russian Revolution
[...More...]

picture info

Close-mid Front Unrounded Vowel
The close-mid front unrounded vowel, or high-mid front unrounded vowel,[1] is a type of vowel sound, used in some spoken languages. The symbol in the International Phonetic Alphabet
International Phonetic Alphabet
that represents this sound is ⟨e⟩. For the close-mid (near-)front rounded vowel that is usually transcribed with the symbol ⟨ɪ⟩ or ⟨i⟩, see near-close near-front unrounded vowel
[...More...]

picture info

Open-mid Front Unrounded Vowel
The open-mid front unrounded vowel, or low-mid front unrounded vowel,[1] is a type of vowel sound used in some spoken languages
[...More...]

picture info

Open Front Unrounded Vowel
The open front unrounded vowel, or low front unrounded vowel,[1] is a type of vowel sound, used in some spoken languages. It is one of the eight primary cardinal vowels, not directly intended to correspond to a vowel sound of a specific language but rather to serve as a fundamental reference point in a phonetic measuring system.[2] The symbol in the International Phonetic Alphabet
International Phonetic Alphabet
(IPA) that represents this sound is ⟨a⟩, and in the IPA vowel chart it is positioned at the lower-left corner
[...More...]

Aspirated Consonant
In phonetics, aspiration is the strong burst of breath that accompanies either the release or, in the case of preaspiration, the closure of some obstruents. In English, aspirated consonants are allophones in complementary distribution with their unaspirated counterparts, but in some other languages, notably most Indian and East Asian languages, the difference is contrastive, while in Arabic and Persian, all stops are aspirated.[citation needed] To feel or see the difference between aspirated and unaspirated sounds, one can put a hand or a lit candle in front of one's mouth, and say spin [spɪn] and then pin [pʰɪn]
[...More...]

picture info

Voiced Bilabial Stop
The voiced bilabial stop is a type of consonantal sound, used in some spoken languages. The symbol in the International Phonetic Alphabet that represents this sound is ⟨b⟩, and the equivalent X-SAMPA symbol is b. The voiced bilabial stop occurs in English, and it is the sound denoted by the letter ⟨b⟩ in boy. Many Indian languages, such as Hindustani, have a two-way[clarification needed] contrast between breathy voiced /bʱ/ and plain /b/.Contents1 Features 2 Varieties 3 Occurrence 4 See also 5 References 6 BibliographyFeatures[edit] Features of the voiced bilabial stop:Its manner of articulation is occlusive, which means it is produced by obstructing airflow in the vocal tract
[...More...]

picture info

Close Front Unrounded Vowel
The close front unrounded vowel, or high front unrounded vowel,[1] is a type of vowel sound that occurs in most spoken languages, represented in the International Phonetic Alphabet
International Phonetic Alphabet
by the symbol i. It is similar to the vowel sound in the English word meet—and often called long-e in American English.[2] Although in English this sound has additional length (usually being represented as /iː/) and is not normally pronounced as a pure vowel (it is a slight diphthong), some dialects have been reported to pronounce the phoneme as a pure sound.[3] A pure [i] sound is also heard in many other languages, such as French, in words like chic. The close front unrounded vowel is the vocalic equivalent of the palatal approximant [j]. The two are almost identical featurally
[...More...]

picture info

Unicode Range
The Unicode Consortium
Unicode Consortium
(UC) and the International Organisation for Standardisation (ISO) collaborate on the Universal Character Set (UCS). The UCS is an international standard to map characters used in natural language, mathematics, music, and other domains to machine readable values. By creating this mapping, the UCS enables computer software vendors to interoperate and transmit UCS encoded text strings from one to another. Because it is a universal map, it can be used to represent multiple languages at the same time. This avoids the confusion of using multiple legacy character encodings, which can result in the same sequence of codes having multiple meanings and thus be improperly decoded if the wrong one is chosen. UCS has a potential capacity to encode over 1 million characters
[...More...]

picture info

Acute Accent
The acute accent ( ´ ) is a diacritic used in many modern written languages with alphabets based on the Latin, Cyrillic, and Greek scripts.Contents1 Uses1.1 History 1.2 Pitch1.2.1 Greek1.3 Stress 1.4 Height 1.5 Length1.5.1 Long vowels 1.5.2 Short vowels1.6 Palatalization 1.7 Tone 1.8 Disambiguation 1.9 Emphasis 1.10 Letter extension 1.11 Other uses 1.12 English2 Technical notes2.1 Microsoft Windows2.1.1 Microsoft Office2.2 Macintosh OS X 2.3 Keyboards 2.4 Internet 2.5 Limitations3 Notes 4 See also 5 External linksUses[edit] History[edit] An early precursor of the acute accent was the apex, used in Latin inscriptions to mark long vowels. Pitch[edit] Greek[edit] See also: Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek
accent The acute accent was first used in the polytonic orthography of Ancient Greek, where it indicated a syllable with a high pitch
[...More...]

picture info

Voiced Labiodental Fricative
The voiced labiodental fricative is a type of consonantal sound used in some spoken languages. The symbol in the International Phonetic Alphabet that represents this sound is ⟨v⟩, and the equivalent X-SAMPA
X-SAMPA
symbol is v. Although this is a familiar sound to most European and Middle Eastern listeners, it is cross-linguistically a fairly uncommon sound, being only a quarter as frequent as [w]
[...More...]

picture info

Voiced Velar Stop
The voiced velar stop is a type of consonantal sound, used in some spoken languages. The symbol in the International Phonetic Alphabet that represents this sound is ⟨ɡ⟩, and the equivalent X-SAMPA symbol is g. Strictly, the IPA symbol is the so-called single-story G , but the double-story G is considered an acceptable alternative
[...More...]

picture info

Velar Nasal
The velar nasal is a type of consonantal sound, used in some spoken languages. It is the sound of ng in English sing. The symbol in the International Phonetic Alphabet
International Phonetic Alphabet
that represents this sound is ⟨ŋ⟩, and the equivalent X-SAMPA
X-SAMPA
symbol is N. The IPA
IPA
symbol ⟨ŋ⟩ is similar to ⟨ɳ⟩, the symbol for the retroflex nasal, which has a rightward-pointing hook extending from the bottom of the right stem, and to ⟨ɲ⟩, the symbol for the palatal nasal, which has a leftward-pointing hook extending from the bottom of the left stem. Both the IPA
IPA
symbol and the sound are commonly called 'eng' or 'engma'. As a phoneme, the velar nasal does not occur in many of the indigenous languages of the Americas or in a large number of European or Middle Eastern or Caucasian languages, but it is extremely common in Australian Aboriginal languages
[...More...]

picture info

Voiceless Velar Stop
The voiceless velar stop or voiceless velar plosive is a type of consonantal sound used in many spoken languages. The symbol in the International Phonetic Alphabet
International Phonetic Alphabet
that represents this sound is ⟨k⟩, and the equivalent X-SAMPA
X-SAMPA
symbol is k. The [k] sound is a very common sound cross-linguistically. Most languages have at least a plain [k], and some distinguish more than one variety. Most Indo-Aryan languages, such as Hindi
Hindi
and Bengali, have a two-way contrast between aspirated and plain [k]. Only a few languages lack a voiceless velar stop, e.g
[...More...]

picture info

Voiced Dental Fricative
The voiced dental fricative is a consonant sound used in some spoken languages. It is familiar to English-speakers, as the th sound in father. Its symbol in the International Phonetic Alphabet
International Phonetic Alphabet
is eth, or [ð] and was taken from the Old English and Icelandic letter eth, which could stand for either a voiced or unvoiced interdental non-sibilant fricative
[...More...]

ISO 15924
ISO 15924, Codes for the representation of names of scripts, defines two sets of codes for a number of writing systems (scripts). Each script is given both a four-letter code and a numeric one.[1] Script is defined as "set of graphic characters used for the written form of one or more languages".[1] Where possible the codes are derived from ISO 639-2 where the name of a script and the name of a language using the script are identical (example: Gujarātī ISO 639 guj, ISO 15924 Gujr). Preference is given to the 639-2 Bibliographical codes, which is different from the otherwise often preferred use of the Terminological codes.[1] 4-letter ISO 15924 codes are incorporated into the Language Subtag Registry for IETF language tags and so can be used in file formats that make use of such language tags
[...More...]

.