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Great Siege Of Gibraltar
 Great Britain Hanover Spain  FranceCommanders and leaders George Augustus Eliott Roger Curtis[3] August de la Motte Duc de Crillon Martín Álvarez de Sotomayor[4] Luis de Córdova y Córdova Antonio Barceló[3]StrengthJune 1779: 5,382 men;[5] September 1782: 7,500[6](including 500 gunners)[7] men 96 guns 12 gunboats[8] Total: 7,500 June 1779: 13,749 men[9] September 1782: 33,000[10]-35,000 soldiers[11] 30,000 sailors & marines[12] 114 land guns & mortars[13]; 47 ships of the line,[11] 10 floating batteries 7 xebecs & 40 gunboats[9] Total: 65,000Casualties and losses333 killed 911 wounded 536 died from disease.[14][15] Total: 1,781 6,000 killed, wounded, captured & missing,[16] unknown to disease 10 ships sunk, 1 ship of the line captured[17]v t eAnglo-Spanish War 1779–1783Europe & AtlanticEnglish Channel Gibraltar Azores Lisbon 20 November 1779 Cape Finisterre St. Vincent Cape St
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Gunboat
A gunboat is a naval watercraft designed for the express purpose of carrying one or more guns to bombard coastal targets, as opposed to those military craft designed for naval warfare, or for ferrying troops or supplies.Contents1 History1.1 Pre-steam era 1.2 Steam era 1.3 World War II1.3.1 United Kingdom 1.3.2 United States 1.3.3 Soviet Union1.4 Vietnam War2 See also 3 Notes 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] Pre-steam era[edit] In the age of sail, a gunboat was usually a small undecked vessel carrying a single smoothbore cannon in the bow, or just two or three such cannons
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Fort Rosalie
Fort Rosalie
Fort Rosalie
was a French fort built in 1716 in the territory of the Natchez Native Americans. The present-day city of Natchez, Mississippi, developed at this site. As part of the peace terms that ended the Natchez War of 1716, Jean-Baptiste Le Moyne, Sieur de Bienville required the Natchez to build the fort by providing materials and labor. Sited close to the main Natchez settlement, called the Grand Village of the Natchez, Fort Rosalie
Fort Rosalie
served as the primary French stronghold and trading post among the Natchez. French settlements and tobacco plantations were established in Natchez territory, with the fort serving as the local seat of colonial government
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Xebec
A xebec (/ˈziːbɛk/ or /zɪˈbɛk/), also spelled zebec, was a Mediterranean
Mediterranean
sailing ship that was used mostly for trading. It would have a long overhanging bowsprit and aft-set mizzen mast. The term can also refer to a small, fast vessel of the sixteenth to nineteenth centuries, used almost exclusively in the Mediterranean
Mediterranean
Sea.Contents1 Description 2 Etymology 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksDescription[edit]Greek-Ottoman xebecXebecs were similar to galleys used by Algerian corsairs and Barbary pirates having both lateen sails and oars for propulsion. Early xebecs had two masts; later ones three. Xebecs featured a distinctive hull with pronounced overhanging bow and stern,[1] and rarely displaced more than 200 tons, making them slightly smaller and with slightly fewer guns than frigates of the period. Some victorious xebecs of the Spanish Navy, about 1770 (see Antonio Barceló campaigns..
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Gunboats
A gunboat is a naval watercraft designed for the express purpose of carrying one or more guns to bombard coastal targets, as opposed to those military craft designed for naval warfare, or for ferrying troops or supplies.Contents1 History1.1 Pre-steam era 1.2 Steam era 1.3 World War II1.3.1 United Kingdom 1.3.2 United States 1.3.3 Soviet Union1.4 Vietnam War2 See also 3 Notes 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] Pre-steam era[edit] In the age of sail, a gunboat was usually a small undecked vessel carrying a single smoothbore cannon in the bow, or just two or three such cannons
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Artillery
Artillery
Artillery
is a class of large military weapons built to fire munitions far beyond the range and power of infantry's small arms. Early artillery development focused on the ability to breach fortifications, and led to heavy, fairly immobile siege engines. As technology improved, lighter, more mobile field artillery developed for battlefield use. This development continues today; modern self-propelled artillery vehicles are highly mobile weapons of great versatility providing the largest share of an army's total firepower. In its earliest sense, the word artillery referred to any group of soldiers primarily armed with some form of manufactured weapon or armour. Since the introduction of gunpowder and cannon, the word "artillery" has largely meant cannon, and in contemporary usage, it usually refers to shell-firing guns, howitzers, mortars, rockets and guided missiles
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Battle Of St. Louis
A battle is a combat in warfare between two or more armed forces, or combatants. A war sometimes consists of many battles. Battles generally are well defined in duration, area, and force commitment.[1] A battle with only limited engagement between the forces and without decisive results is sometimes called a skirmish. Wars and military campaigns are guided by strategy, whereas battles take place on a level of planning and execution known as operational mobility.[2] German strategist Carl von Clausewitz
Carl von Clausewitz
stated that "the employment of battles ..
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Battle Of Cape St. Vincent (1780)
Vincent
Vincent
(Latin: Vincentius) is a male given name derived from the Roman name Vincentius, which is derived from the Latin
Latin
word "vincere" (to conquer).Contents1 Translations 2 People with the given name
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Capture Of Río Hondo
Rio
Rio
or Río, the Portuguese and Spanish words for river, may refer to:Contents1 Places 2 People2.1 Surname3 Technology 4 Organizations 5 Transportation 6 Politics 7 Film, TV and games 8 Music8.1 Albums 8.2 Songs9 Acronyms 10 See alsoPlaces[edit] Rio
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Province Of Hanover
The Province of Hanover (German: Provinz Hannover) was a province of the Kingdom of Prussia and the Free State of Prussia from 1868 to 1946. During the Austro-Prussian War, the Kingdom of Hanover had attempted to maintain a neutral position, along with some other member states of the German Confederation. After Hanover voted in favour of mobilising confederation troops against Prussia on 14 June 1866, Prussia saw this as a just cause for declaring war; the Kingdom of Hanover was soon dissolved and annexed by Prussia
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Capture Of Cayo Cocina
Capture may refer to:Asteroid capture, a phenomenon in which an asteroid enters a stable orbit around another body "Capture" a song by Simon Townshend Capture (band), an Australian electronicore band previously known as Capture the Crown Capture (chess), to remove the opponent's piece from the board by taking it with on
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Battle Of San Fernando De Omoa
The Battle of San Fernando de Omoa
San Fernando de Omoa
was a short siege and battle between British and Spanish forces fought not long after Spain
Spain
entered the American Revolutionary War
American Revolutionary War
on the American side. On 16 October 1779, following a brief attempt at siege, a force of 150 British soldiers and seamen assaulted and captured the fortifications at San Fernando de Omoa
Omoa
in the Captaincy General of Guatemala
Captaincy General of Guatemala
(now Honduras) on the Gulf of Honduras. The British forces managed to overwhelm and capture the Spanish garrison, consisting of 365 men. The British only held the fort until November 1779
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Kingdom Of France
La Parisienne (1830–1848) "The Parisian"The Kingdom of France
France
in 1789.Capital Paris
Paris
(987–1682) Versailles (1682–1789)
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Enlightenment Spain
The ideas of the Age of Enlightenment
Age of Enlightenment
(in Spanish, Ilustración) came to Spain
Spain
in the eighteenth century with the new Bourbon dynasty, following the death of the last Habsburg monarch, Charles II, in 1700. "Like the Spanish Enlightenment, the Spanish Bourbon monarchs were imbued with Spain's Catholic identity."[1] The period of reform and 'enlightened despotism' under the Bourbons focused on centralizing and modernizing the Spanish government, and improvement of infrastructure, beginning with the rule of King Charles III and the work of his minister, José Moñino, count of Floridablanca
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Spain
Coordinates: 40°N 4°W / 40°N 4°W / 40; -4Kingdom of Spain Reino de España  (Spanish)6 other official names[a][b]Aragonese: Reino d'EspanyaAsturian: Reinu d'EspañaBasque: Espainiako ErresumaCatalan: Regne d'EspanyaGalician: Reino de EspañaOccitan: Reiaume d'EspanhaFlagCoat of armsMotto: "Plus Ultra" (Latin) "Further Beyond"Anthem: "Marcha Real" (Spanish)[2] "Royal March"Location of  Spain  (dark green) – in Europe  (green & dark grey) – in the European Union  (green)Capital and largest city Madrid 40°26′N 3°42′W / 40.433°N 3.700°W / 40.433; -3.700Official language and national language Spanish[c]Co-official languages in certain autonomous communities Catalan Galician Basque OccitanEthnic groups (2015)89.9% Spanish 10.1% othersReligi
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Electorate Of Brunswick-Lüneburg
The Electorate of Brunswick-Lüneburg
Brunswick-Lüneburg
(German: Kurfürstentum Braunschweig-Lüneburg), colloquially Electorate of Hanover
Hanover
(German: Kurfürstentum Hannover or simply German: Kurhannover), was established in 1692 as the ninth Electorate of the Holy Roman Empire and formally approved in 1708. It was ruled by the House of Hanover, a cadet branch of the House of Welf, which then ruled and earlier had ruled a number of principalities, which had several times been partitioned among several heirs from the Duchy of Brunswick-Lüneburg. After 1705, only two of these territories existed. One was the Principality of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel, which remained independent as the Duchy of Brunswick (new title adopted in 1815) until 1918
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