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Great Budworth
Great Budworth
Great Budworth
is a civil parish and village, approximately four miles (6.4 km) north of Northwich, England, within the unitary authority of Cheshire
Cheshire
West and Chester
Chester
and the ceremonial county of Cheshire
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Cheshire
Cheshire
Cheshire
(/ˈtʃɛʃər/ CHESH-ər, /-ɪər/ -eer;[2] archaically the County Palatine of Chester)[3] is a county in North West England, bordering Merseyside
Merseyside
and Greater Manchester
Greater Manchester
to the north, Derbyshire to the east, Staffordshire
Staffordshire
and Shropshire
Shropshire
to the south and Flintshire, Wales
Wales
to the west. Cheshire's county town is Chester; the largest town is Warrington.[4] Other major towns include Congleton, Crewe, Ellesmere Port, Macclesfield, Northwich, Runcorn, Widnes, Wilmslow, and Winsford.[5][6] The county covers 905 square miles (2,344 km2) and has a population of around 1 million
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Bucklow Hundred
Coordinates: 53°33′38″N 2°17′57″W / 53.5606°N 2.2991°W / 53.5606; -2.2991HistoryStatus HundredSubdivisions • Type ParishesThe hundred of Bucklow was an ancient division of the historic county of Cheshire, in northern England. It was known to have been in existence at least as early as 1260, and it was formed from the earlier Domesday hundreds of Bochelau and Tunendune.[1][2]Contents1 Courts 2 See also 3 Notes and references3.1 Notes 3.2 BibliographyCourts[edit] Courts, or Eyres, were normally held annually in the region, a week after the close of the county court. The Justice of Chester presided over the courts, and he would spend several days visiting each hundred in the region
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North West England (European Parliament Constituency)
In modern politics and history, a parliament is a legislative, elected body of government. Generally, a modern parliament has three functions: representing the electorate, making laws, and overseeing the government via hearings and inquiries. The term is similar to the idea of a senate, synod or congress, and is commonly used in countries that are current or former monarchies, a form of government with a monarch as the head. Some contexts restrict the use of the word parliament to parliamentary systems, although it is also used to describe the legislature in some presidential systems (e.g. the French parliament), even where it is not in the official name. Historically, parliaments included various kinds of deliberative, consultative, and judicial assemblies, e.g
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List Of United Kingdom Locations
A gazetteer of place names in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
showing each place's county, unitary authority or council area and its geographical coordinates.A B C D E F G H I, J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X–ZSee also External linksThe United KingdomLocation names beginning with ALocation names beginning with Aa–Ak Location names beginning with Al Location names beginning with Am–Ar Location names beginning with As–AzLocation names beginning with BLocation names beginning with Bab–Bal Location names beginning with Bam
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Ordnance Survey National Grid
The Ordnance Survey
Ordnance Survey
National Grid reference
Grid reference
system is a system of geographic grid references used in Great Britain, distinct from latitude and longitude. It is often called British National Grid (BNG).[1][2] The Ordnance Survey
Ordnance Survey
(OS) devised the national grid reference system, and it is heavily used in their survey data, and in maps based on those surveys, whether published by the Ordnance Survey
Ordnance Survey
or by commercial map producers
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position; alternatively, a geographic position may be expressed in a combined three-dimensional Cartesian vector. A common choice of coordinates is latitude, longitude and elevation.[1] To specify a location on a plane requires a map projection.[2]Contents1 History 2 Geodetic datum 3 Horizontal coordinates3.1 Latitude
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A559 Road
List of A roads in zone 5 in Great Britain
Great Britain
starting north/east of the A5, west of the A6, south of the Solway Firth/ Eden Estuary
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Old Saxon
Old Saxon, also known as Old Low German, was a Germanic language
Germanic language
and the earliest recorded form of Low German
Low German
(spoken nowadays in Northern Germany, the northeastern Netherlands, southern Denmark, the Americas and parts of Eastern Europe). It is a West Germanic language, closely related to the Anglo-Frisian
Anglo-Frisian
languages.[2] It has been documented from the 8th century until the 12th century, when it gradually evolved into Middle Low German. It was spoken throughout modern northwestern Germany, primarily in the coastal regions and in the eastern Netherlands
Netherlands
by Saxons, a Germanic tribe who inhabited the region of Saxony
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Mere (lake)
Mere in English refers to a lake that is broad in relation to its depth, e.g. Martin Mere. A significant effect of its shallow depth is that for all or most of the time, it has no thermocline.Contents1 Derivation of the word1.1 Etymology 1.2 Signification2 Characteristics 3 English meres3.1 Fenland4 Meres in the Netherlands 5 References 6 External linksDerivation of the word[edit] Etymology[edit] The word mere is recorded in Old English as mere ″sea, lake″, corresponding to Old Saxon meri, Old Low Franconian *meri (Dutch meer ″lake, pool″, Picard mer ″pool, lake″, Northern French toponymic element -mer), Old High German mari / meri (German Meer ″sea″), Goth. mari-, marei, Old Norse marr ″sea″ (Norwegian mar ″sea″, Shetland Norn mar ″mer, deep water fishing qarea″, Faroese marrur ″mud, sludge″, Swedish place name element mar-, French mare ″pool, pond″)
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Deanery
Corpus Juris CanoniciDecretist Regulæ Juris Decretals of Gregory IXDecretalistDecretum Gratiani Extravagantes Liber SeptimusAncient Church OrdersDidache The Apostolic ConstitutionsCanons of the ApostlesCollections of ancient canonsCollectiones canonum Dionysianae Collectio canonum quadripartita Collectio canonum Quesnelliana Collectio canonum WigorniensisOtherPseudo-Isidorian Decretals Benedictus Deus (Pius IV) Contractum trinius Defect of Birth Jus exclusivae Papal appointmentOriental lawCode of Canons of the Eastern Churches Eastern Canonical Reforms of Pius XII Nomocanon ArcheparchyEparchyLiturgical lawEcclesia Dei Mysterii Paschalis Sacrosanctum conciliumMusicam sacramSummorum Pontificum Tra le sollecitudiniSacramental lawCanon 844 Ex opere operato Omnium in mentem Valid but illicitHoly OrdersImpediment (canon law)Abstemius


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North West Ambulance Service
The North West Ambulance Service
North West Ambulance Service
NHS Trust (NWAS), formerly 4 services ( Cumbria
Cumbria
Ambulance Service, Lancashire
Lancashire
Ambulance Service, Cheshire
Cheshire
and Mersey Ambulance Service and Greater Manchester
Manchester
Ambulance Service), was formed on 1 July 2006, as part of Health Minister Lord Warner's plans to reduce the number of NHS ambulance service trusts operating in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
meaning that (NWAS) was given a bigger area to cover, making them the second largest in England [2]NWAS ambulance on an emergency callResponse car on Market Street, ManchesterIt is one of 10 Ambulance Trusts providing England with Emergency medical services, and is part of the National Health Service, receiving direct government funding for its role
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Prestbury, Cheshire
Prestbury is a village and civil parish in Cheshire, England. About 1.5 miles (3 km) north of Macclesfield, at the 2001 census, it had a population of 3,324,[1] increasing slightly to 3,471 at the 2011 Census.[2] Alongside fellow " Cheshire
Cheshire
Golden Triangle" villages Wilmslow
Wilmslow
and Alderley Edge, it is one of the most sought after and expensive places to live outside London. The ecclesiastical parish is almost the same as the former Prestbury local government ward which consisted of the civil parishes of Prestbury, Adlington, and Mottram St
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Domesday Book
Domesday Book
Domesday Book
(/ˈduːmzdeɪ/ or US: /ˈdoʊmzdeɪ/;[1][2] Latin: Liber de Wintonia "Book of Winchester") is a manuscript record of the "Great Survey" of much of England and parts of Wales completed in 1086 by order of King William the Conqueror. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle states:[3]Then, at the midwinter [1085], was the king in Gloucester
Gloucester
with his council ... . After this had the king a large meeting, and very deep consultation with his council, about this land; how it was occupied, and by what sort of men
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Augustinians
Catholicism portal Philosophy portalThe term Augustinians, named after Augustine of Hippo
Augustine of Hippo
(354–430), applies to two distinct types of Catholic religious orders and some Anglican religious orders. Within Anglicanism the Rule of St. Augustine is followed only by women, who form several different communities of Augustinian nuns
Augustinian nuns
in the Anglican Communion. Within Roman Catholicism Augustinians
Augustinians
may be members of either one of two separate and distinct types of Order:Several mendicant Orders of friars, who lived a mixed religious life of contemplation and apostolic ministry and follow the Rule of St. Augustine, a brief document providing guidelines for living in a religious community. The largest and most familiar, originally known as the Hermits of St
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Canon (priest)
A canon (from the Latin
Latin
canonicus, itself derived from the Greek κανονικός, kanonikós, "relating to a rule", "regular") is a member of certain bodies subject to an ecclesiastical rule. Originally, a canon was a cleric living with others in a clergy house or, later, in one of the houses within the precinct of or close to a cathedral and conducting his life according to the orders or rules of the church. This way of life grew common (and is first documented) in the eighth century. In the eleventh century, some churches required clergy thus living together to adopt the rule first proposed by Saint Augustine that they renounce private wealth
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