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Great Books
The great books are books that are thought to constitute an essential foundation in the literature of Western culture. Specified sets of great books typically range from 100 to 150, though they differ according to purpose and context
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The Great Book Of Ireland
The Great Book of Ireland, a gallery and anthology of modern Irish art and poetry, was a project which began in 1989. The book was published in 1991 and in January 2013 it was acquired by University College Cork for $1 million. A huge volume of 250 pages of (510 by 360 by 110mm), the book brings together the work of 121 artists, 143 poets and 9 composers who painted, drew and wrote directly on the vellum. Calligraphy by Denis Brown to each opening serves to unify the book, which was bound in elm by A.G. Cains, Eamonn Martin and Gene Lambert of Mills Trust and Theo Dorgan of Poetry Ireland, who initiated the project in 1989. All the contributors worked directly onto the large vellum pages, handmade by Joe Katz, and their work was unified by a calligrapher, Denis Brown, aided by design consultant Trevor Scott S.D.I
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Western Culture
Western culture, sometimes equated with Western civilization, Occidental culture, the Western world, Western society, European civilization, or Christian
Christian
civilization,[2] is a term used very broadly to refer to a heritage of social norms, ethical values, traditional customs, belief systems, political systems and specific artifacts and technologies that have some origin or association with Europe. The term also applies beyond Europe
Europe
to countries and cultures whose histories are strongly connected to Europe
Europe
by immigration, colonization, or influence
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Boston University
Newbury Biblical Institute (1839–1847) Methodist
Methodist
General Biblical Institute (1847–1867) Boston
Boston
Theological Institute (1867–1869)Motto Learning, Virtue, Piety[1]Type Private, researchEstablished 1839[2][3]Endowment $1.96 billion (2017)[4]President Robert A
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University Of Chicago
The University
University
of Chicago
Chicago
(UChi, U of C, Chicago, or UChicago) is a private research university in Chicago, Illinois. It holds top-ten positions in various national and international rankings.[9][10][11][12] The university is composed of the College, various graduate programs and interdisciplinary committees organized into five academic research divisions and seven professional schools. Beyond the arts and sciences, Chicago
Chicago
is also well known for its professional schools, which include the Pritzker School of Medicine, the Booth School of Business, the Law School, the School of Social Service Administration, the Harris School of Public Policy Studies, the Divinity School and the Graham School of Continuing Liberal and Professional Studies
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Educational Crossover
Crossover, sometimes referred to as cross-pollination, is a philosophical presupposition of Liberal arts, Great books, and Integrative learning approaches to education. The value of such crossover is disputed by those who adhere to certain versions of Pragmatism, especially John Dewey. Wiktionary[edit]Cross-pollinationThis article relating to education is a stub
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Pragmatism
Pragmatism
Pragmatism
is a philosophical tradition that began in the United States around 1870.[1] Its origins are often attributed to the philosophers William James, John Dewey, and Charles Sanders Peirce. Peirce later described it in his pragmatic maxim: "Consider the practical effects of the objects of your conception. Then, your conception of those effects is the whole of your conception of the object."[2] Pragmatism
Pragmatism
considers thought as an instrument or tool for prediction, problem solving and action, and rejects the idea that the function of thought is to describe, represent, or mirror reality.[3] Pragmatists contend that most philosophical topics—such as the nature of knowledge, language, concepts, meaning, belief, and science—are all best viewed in terms of their practical uses and successes
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John Dewey
John Dewey
John Dewey
(/ˈduːi/; October 20, 1859 – June 1, 1952) was an American philosopher, psychologist, Georgist, and educational reformer whose ideas have been influential in education and social reform. Dewey is one of the primary figures associated with the philosophy of pragmatism and is considered one of the fathers of functional psychology. A Review of General Psychology survey, published in 2002, ranked Dewey as the 93rd most cited psychologist of the 20th century.[2] A well-known public intellectual, he was also a major voice of progressive education and liberalism.[3][4] Although Dewey is known best for his publications about education, he also wrote about many other topics, including epistemology, metaphysics, aesthetics, art, logic, social theory, and ethics
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Sidney Hook
Sidney Hook
Sidney Hook
(December 20, 1902 – July 12, 1989) was an American philosopher of the Pragmatist school known for his contributions to the philosophy of history, the philosophy of education, political theory, and ethics. After embracing Communism
Communism
in his youth, Hook was later known for his criticisms of totalitarianism, both fascism, and Marxism–Leninism
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Higher Education
Higher education
Higher education
(also called post-secondary education, third level or tertiary education) is an optional final stage of formal learning that occurs after completion of secondary education. Often delivered at universities, academies, colleges, seminaries, conservatories, and institutes of technology, higher education is also available through certain college-level institutions, including vocational schools, trade schools, and other career colleges that award academic degrees or professional certifications. Tertiary education
Tertiary education
at non-degree level is sometimes referred to as further education or continuing education as distinct from higher education. The right of access to higher education is mentioned in a number of international human rights instruments
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Alexander Meiklejohn
Alexander Meiklejohn (/ˈmɪkəlˌdʒɒn/; 3 February 1872 – 17 December 1964) was a philosopher, university administrator, educational reformer, and free-speech advocate. He served as dean of Brown University and president of Amherst College.Contents1 Life and career 2 On free speech 3 Legacy and recognition 4 Books 5 See also 6 Notes 7 References 8 External linksLife and career[edit] Meiklejohn was born in Newbold Street, Rochdale, Lancashire, England of Scottish descent, being the youngest of eight sons. When he was eight, the family moved to the United States, settling in Rhode Island. Family members pooled their money to send him to school. He earned his bachelor's and master's degrees at Brown, graduating Phi Beta Kappa, and completed his doctorate in philosophy at Cornell in 1897. At Brown he was a member of Theta Delta Chi. In the same year, he began teaching at Brown. In 1901 he became dean of the school, a position he held for twelve years
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Columbia University
Columbia University
Columbia University
(Columbia; officially Columbia University
Columbia University
in the City of New York), established in 1754, is a private Ivy League research university in Upper Manhattan, New York City. Columbia contains the oldest college in the state of New York and is the fifth chartered institution of higher learning in the United States, making it one of nine colonial colleges founded prior to the Declaration of Independence.[9] It was established as King's College by royal charter of George II of Great Britain
George II of Great Britain
and renamed Columbia College in 1784 following the American Revolutionary War. The college has produced numerous distinguished alumni
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Thomas Jefferson
Thomas Jefferson
Thomas Jefferson
(April 13 [O.S. April 2] 1743 – July 4, 1826) was an American Founding Father who was the principal author of the Declaration of Independence and later served as the third President of the United States
President of the United States
from 1801 to 1809. Previously, he was elected the second Vice President of the United States, serving under John Adams
John Adams
from 1797 to 1801. A proponent of democracy, republicanism, and individual rights motivating American colonists to break from Great Britain and form a new nation, he produced formative documents and decisions at both the state and national level. He was a land owner and farmer. Jefferson was primarily of English ancestry, born and educated in colonial Virginia. He graduated from the College of William & Mary and briefly practiced law, at times defending slaves seeking their freedom
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Harold Bloom
Harold Bloom (born July 11, 1930) is an American literary critic and Sterling Professor
Sterling Professor
of Humanities
Humanities
at Yale
Yale
University.[1] Since the publication of his first book in 1959, Bloom has written more than forty books,[2] including twenty books of literary criticism, several books discussing religion, and a novel
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University Of Notre Dame
The University of Notre Dame
University of Notre Dame
du Lac (or simply Notre Dame /ˌnoʊtərˈdeɪm/ NOH-tər-DAYM) is a private, non-profit Catholic research university located adjacent to South Bend, Indiana, in the United States.[7] The main campus covers 1,250 acres (510 ha) in a suburban setting and it contains a number of recognizable landmarks, such as the Golden Dome, the "Word of Life" mural (commonly known as Touchdown
Touchdown
Jesus), the Notre Dame Stadium, and the Basilica. The school was founded on November 26, 1842, by Father Edward Sorin, CSC, who was also its first president. Notre Dame is consistently recognized as one of the top universities in the world, in particular for its undergraduate education.[8][9][10][11] Undergraduate students are organized into six colleges, Arts and Letters, Science, Engineering, Business, Architecture and Global Affairs
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Literature
Literature, most generically, is any body of written works. More restrictively, literature is writing considered to be an art form, or any single writing deemed to have artistic or intellectual value, often due to deploying language in ways that differ from ordinary usage. Its Latin root literatura/litteratura (derived itself from littera: letter or handwriting) was used to refer to all written accounts, though contemporary definitions extend the term to include texts that are spoken or sung (oral literature). The concept has changed meaning over time: nowadays it can broaden to have non-written verbal art forms, and thus it is difficult to agree on its origin, which can be paired with that of language or writing itself
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