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Graphing Calculator
A graphing calculator (also graphics / graphic display calculator) is a handheld computer that is capable of plotting graphs, solving simultaneous equations, and performing other tasks with variables. Most popular graphing calculators are also programmable, allowing the user to create customized programs, typically for scientific/engineering and education applications. Because they have large displays in comparison to standard 4-operation handheld calculators, graphing calculators also typically display several lines of text and calculations at the same time.Contents1 History 2 Features2.1 Computer algebra systems 2.2 Laboratory usage 2.3 Games3 Graphing calculators in education 4 Programming 5 See also 6 References 7 Further readingHistory[edit] Casio
Casio
fx-7000G; The world's first graphing calculator Casio
Casio
produced the first commercially available graphing calculator, the fx-7000G, in 1985
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NuCalc
NuCalc, also known as Graphing Calculator, is a computer software tool made by the company Pacific Tech. The tool can perform many graphing calculator functions. It can graph inequalities and vector fields, as well as functions in two, three, or four dimensions. It supports several different coordinate systems, and can solve equations. It is available for OS X
OS X
(under the name Graphing Calculator) and Microsoft Windows.Contents1 History 2 Product 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] The Graphing Calculator 1.0 software was bundled for free on all Power Macintosh computers since its introduction in 1994. This means that it was shipped on more than 20 million machines, and is the most familiar version of the program
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Casio Cassiopeia A-11
Casio
Casio
Cassiopeia was the brand name of a PDA manufactured by Casio. It used Windows CE
Windows CE
as the Operating system
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International Baccalaureate
The International Baccalaureate (IB), formerly known as the International Baccalaureate Organization (IBO), is an international educational foundation headquartered in Geneva, Switzerland
Switzerland
and founded in 1968.[1][2] It offers four educational programmes: the IB Diploma Programme and the IB Career-related Programme for students aged 16 to 19, the IB Middle Years Programme, designed for students aged 11 to 16, and the IB Primary Years Programme for children aged 3 to 12.[3] To teach these programmes, schools need to be authorized by the International Baccalaureate Organization. The organisation's name and logo were changed in 2007 to reflect a reorganisation
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ACT (test)
The ACT (/eɪ siː tiː/; originally an abbreviation of American College Testing)[10] is a standardized test used for college admissions in the United States. It was first introduced in November 1959 by University of Iowa
University of Iowa
professor Everett Franklin Lindquist as a competitor to the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT).[11] It is currently administered by ACT, a nonprofit organization of the same name.[10] The ACT originally consisted of four tests: English, Mathematics, Social Studies, and Natural Sciences
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SAT
The SAT
SAT
(/ˌɛsˌeɪˈtiː/ ess-ay-TEE) is a standardized test widely used for college admissions in the United States. Introduced in 1926, its name and scoring have changed several times; originally called the Scholastic Aptitude Test, it was later called the Scholastic Assessment Test, then the SAT
SAT
I: Reasoning Test, then the SAT Reasoning Test, and now, simply the SAT. The SAT
SAT
is owned, developed, and published by the College
College
Board, a private, non-profit organization in the United States. It is administered on behalf of the College Board
College Board
by the Educational Testing Service,[3] which until recently developed the SAT
SAT
as well.[4] The test is intended to assess students' readiness for college
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Advanced Placement
Advanced Placement
Advanced Placement
(AP) is a program in the United States
United States
and Canada created by the College Board
College Board
which offers college-level curricula and examinations to high school students. American colleges and universities may grant placement and course credit to students who obtain high scores on the examinations. The AP curriculum for each of the various subjects is created for the College Board
College Board
by a panel of experts and college-level educators in that field of study. For a high school course to have the designation, the course must be audited by the College Board
College Board
to ascertain that it satisfies the AP curriculum
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QWERTY
QWERTY
QWERTY
is a keyboard design for Latin-script alphabets. The name comes from the order of the first six keys on the top left letter row of the keyboard (Q W E R T Y). The QWERTY
QWERTY
design is based on a layout created for the " onclick="link_click('Sholes and Glidden typewriter') " href="../php/SummaryGet.php?FindGo=Sholes_and_Glidden_typewriter " style= " text-decoration:none; color:#000060; " target="_blank"> Sholes and Glidden typewriter " height="200 " width="122.90502793296";>
Sholes and Glidden typewriter
and sold to Remington in 1873. It became popular with the success of the Remington No
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College Board
College Board
College Board
is an American non-profit organization that was formed in December 1899 as the College Entrance Examination Board (CEEB) to expand access to higher education. While College Board
College Board
is not an association of colleges, it runs a membership association of institutions, including over 6,000 schools, colleges, universities and other educational organizations. College Board
College Board
develops and administers standardized tests and curricula used by K–12 and post-secondary education institutions to promote college-readiness and as part of the college admissions process. College Board
College Board
is headquartered in New York City.[1] David Coleman has been the president of College Board
College Board
since October 2012
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Periodic Table
The periodic table, also known as the periodic table of elements, is a tabular display of the chemical elements, which are arranged by atomic number, electron configuration, and recurring chemical properties. The structure of the table shows periodic trends. The seven rows of the table, called periods, generally have metals on the left and non-metals on the right. The columns, called groups, contain elements with similar chemical behaviours. Six groups have accepted names as well as assigned numbers: for example, group 17 elements are the halogens; and group 18 are the noble gases
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Physics
Physics
Physics
(from Ancient Greek: φυσική (ἐπιστήμη), romanized: physikḗ (epistḗmē), lit. 'knowledge of nature', from φύσις phýsis 'nature')[1][2][3] is the natural science that studies matter,[4] its motion and behavior through space and time, and that studies the related entities of energy and force.[5] Physics
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Chemistry
Chemistry
Chemistry
is the scientific discipline involved with elements and compounds composed of atoms, molecules and ions: their composition, structure, properties, behavior and the changes they undergo during a reaction with other substances.[1][2] In the scope of its subject, chemistry occupies an intermediate position between physics and biology.[3] It is sometimes called the central science because it provides a foundation for understanding both basic and applied scientific disciplines at a fundamental level.[4] For example, chemistry explains aspects of
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Calculus
Calculus
Calculus
(from Latin
Latin
calculus, literally 'small pebble', used for counting and calculations, as on an abacus)[1] is the mathematical study of continuous change, in the same way that geometry is the study of shape and algebra is the study of generalizations of arithmetic operations. It has two major branches, differential calculus (concerning rates of change and slopes of curves),[2] and integral calculus (concerning accumulation of quantities and the areas under and between curves).[3] These two branches are related to each other by the fundamental theorem of calculus. Both branches make use of the fundamental notions of convergence of infinite sequences and infinite series to a well-defined limit. Generally, modern calculus is considered to have been developed in the 17th century by Isaac Newton and Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz
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Data Logger
A data logger (also datalogger or data recorder) is an electronic device that records data over time or in relation to location either with a built in instrument or sensor or via external instruments and sensors. Increasingly, but not entirely, they are based on a digital processor (or computer). They generally are small, battery powered, portable, and equipped with a microprocessor, internal memory for data storage, and sensors. Some data loggers interface with a personal computer, and use software to activate the data logger and view and analyze the collected data, while others have a local interface device (keypad, LCD) and can be used as a stand-alone device. Data loggers vary between general purpose types for a range of measurement applications to very specific devices for measuring in one environment or application type only. It is common for general purpose types to be programmable; however, many remain as static machines with only a limited number or no changeable parameters
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Accelerometer
An accelerometer is a device that measures proper acceleration.[1] Proper acceleration, being the acceleration (or rate of change of velocity) of a body in its own instantaneous rest frame,[2] is not the same as coordinate acceleration, being the acceleration in a fixed coordinate system. For example, an accelerometer at rest on the surface of the Earth
Earth
will measure an acceleration due to Earth's gravity, straight upwards (by definition) of g ≈ 9.81 m/s2. By contrast, accelerometers in free fall (falling toward the center of the Earth
Earth
at a rate of about 9.81 m/s2) will measure zero. Accelerometers have multiple applications in industry and science. Highly sensitive accelerometers are components of inertial navigation systems for aircraft and missiles. Accelerometers are used to detect and monitor vibration in rotating machinery
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Reverse Polish Notation
Infix notation Prefix notation ("Polish")v t eReverse Polish notation
Polish notation
(RPN), also known as Polish postfix notation or simply postfix notation, is a mathematical notation in which operators follow their operands, in contrast to Polish notation
Polish notation
(PN), in which operators precede their operands. It does not need any parentheses as long as each operator has a fixed number of operands. The description "Polish" refers to the nationality of logician Jan Łukasiewicz,[1] who invented Polish notation
Polish notation
in 1924.[2][3] The reverse Polish scheme was proposed in 1954 by Arthur Burks, Don Warren, and Jesse Wright[4] and was independently reinvented by Friedrich L. Bauer
Friedrich L. Bauer
and Edsger W. Dijkstra
Edsger W

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