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Graeco-Aryan
Graeco-Aryan, or Graeco-Armeno-Aryan, is a hypothetical clade within the Indo-European family that would be the ancestor of Greek, Armenian, and the Indo-Iranian languages. Graeco-Aryan
Graeco-Aryan
unity would have become divided into Proto-Greek and Proto-Indo-Iranian
Proto-Indo-Iranian
by the mid-3rd millennium BC
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Calvert Watkins
Calvert Watkins (/ˈwɒtkɪnz/; March 13, 1933 – March 20, 2013) was an American linguist and philologist. He is best known for his book How to Kill a Dragon. He was Professor Emeritus of linguistics and the classics at Harvard University
Harvard University
and later went to serve as the professor-in-residence at UCLA.[1] His doctoral dissertation at Harvard University, Indo-European Origins of the Celtic Verb I. The Sigmatic Aorist (Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 1962), which deeply reflected the structuralist approach of Jerzy Kuryłowicz, opened a fresh era of creative work in Celtic comparative linguistics and the study of the verbal system of Indo-European languages. Watkins, in a sense, completed his contribution to this area with his Indogermanische Grammatik, vol. 3, part 1: Geschichte der indogermanischen Verbalflexion (1969)
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Digital Object Identifier
In computing, a Digital Object Identifier or DOI is a persistent identifier or handle used to uniquely identify objects, standardized by the International Organization for Standardization
International Organization for Standardization
(ISO).[1] An implementation of the Handle System,[2][3] DOIs are in wide use mainly to identify academic, professional, and government information, such as journal articles, research reports and data sets, and official publications though they also have been used to identify other types of information resources, such as commercial videos. A DOI aims to be "resolvable", usually to some form of access to the information object to which the DOI refers. This is achieved by binding the DOI to metadata about the object, such as a URL, indicating where the object can be found. Thus, by being actionable and interoperable, a DOI differs from identifiers such as ISBNs and ISRCs which aim only to uniquely identify their referents
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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How To Kill A Dragon
How to Kill a Dragon: Aspects of Indo-European Poetics is a 1995 book about comparative Indo-European poetics by the linguist and classicist Calvert Watkins. It was first published on November 16, 1995 through Oxford University Press
Oxford University Press
and is both an introduction to comparative poetics and an investigation of the myths about dragon-slayers found in different times and in different Indo-European languages.[1] Watkins received a 1998 Goodwin Award of Merit from the American Philological Association (now the Society for Classical Studies) for his work on the book.[2] Synopsis[edit] The book consists of seven parts and 59 chapters
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Armenian Highlands
The Armenian Highlands
Armenian Highlands
(Armenian: Հայկական լեռնաշխարհ, translit. Haykakan leṙnašxarh; also known as the Armenian Upland, Armenian plateau, Armenian tableland,[1] or simply Armenia) is the central-most and highest of three land-locked plateaus[1] that together form the northern sector of the Middle East. To its west is the Anatolian plateau
Anatolian plateau
which rises slowly from the lowland coast of the Aegean Sea
Aegean Sea
and converges with the Armenian Highlands
Armenian Highlands
to the east of Cappadocia. To its southeast is the Iranian plateau, where the elevation drops rapidly by about 600 metres (2,000 ft) to 1,500 metres (5,000 ft) above sea level.[1] The Caucasus
The Caucasus
extends to the northeast of the Armenian Highlands
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Tamaz V. Gamkrelidze
Tamaz (Thomas) Valerianis dze Gamkrelidze (Georgian: თამაზ ვალერიანის ძე გამყრელიძე, Russian: Тама́з Валериа́нович Гамкрели́дзе; born 23 October 1929) is a distinguished Georgian linguist, orientalist public benefactor and Hittitologist, Academic
Academic
(since 1974) and President (since February, 2005) of the Georgian Academy of Sciences
Georgian Academy of Sciences
(GAS), Doctor of Sciences (1963), Professor (1964). Gamkrelidze was born in Kutaisi, Georgian SSR. His brother Revaz Gamkrelidze is also an Academic, a famous mathematician. Tamaz Gamkrelidze graduated from the Faculty of Oriental Studies of the Tbilisi State University
Tbilisi State University
(TSU) in 1952. Since 1964 Gamkrelidze has been a professor of this university, and since 1966 the Head of the Chair of Structural and Applied Linguistics
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Vyacheslav Ivanov (philologist)
Vyacheslav Vsevolodovich Ivanov (Russian: Вячесла́в Все́володович Ива́нов, 21 August 1929 – 7 October 2017) was a prominent Soviet/Russian philologist, semiotician and Indo-Europeanist probably best known for his glottalic theory of Indo-European consonantism and for placing the Indo-European urheimat in the area of the Armenian Highlands and Lake Urmia.Contents1 Early life 2 Career 3 Other interests 4 Selected publications 5 References 6 External links 7 See alsoEarly life[edit] Vyacheslav Ivanov's father was Vsevolod Ivanov, one of the most prominent Soviet writers. His mother was an actress who worked in the theatre of Vsevolod Meyerhold
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Martin Litchfield West
Martin Litchfield West, OM, FBA (23 September 1937 – 13 July 2015) was a British classical scholar. He wrote on ancient Greek music, Greek tragedy, Greek lyric
Greek lyric
poetry, the relations between Greece and the ancient Near East, and the connection between shamanism and early ancient Greek religion, including the Orphic tradition
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Comparative Mythology
Comparative mythology
Comparative mythology
is the comparison of myths from different cultures in an attempt to identify shared themes and characteristics.[1] Comparative mythology
Comparative mythology
has served a variety of academic purposes
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Sanskrit
A few attempts at revival have been reported in Indian and Nepalese newspapers. India: 14,135 Indians claimed Sanskrit
Sanskrit
to be their mother tongue in the 2001 Census of India:[2] Nepal: 1,669 Nepalis
Nepalis
in 2011
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Wolfram Euler
Wolfram Euler (born 5 May 1950) is a German historical linguist and Indo-Europeanist.Contents1 Scientific work 2 Family and private life 3 Publications 4 External links 5 See alsoScientific work[edit] Euler gained his doctorate (Ph.D.) in 1979 at Gießen
Gießen
university (Prof. Rolf Hiersche) with a theses on parallels in nominal formation between Indo-Iranian languages
Indo-Iranian languages
and Greek. The study was received as a contribution to the identification of Greek being part of the phylogenetic Eastern group of indoeuropean languages, despite of the Western geographic location of Greece
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Areal Feature
In linguistics, areal features are elements shared by languages or dialects in a geographic area, particularly when the languages are not descended from a common ancestor language. Contents1 Characteristics 2 Examples 3 See also 4 Notes 5 ReferencesCharacteristics[edit] Resemblances between two or more languages (whether in typology or in vocabulary) can be due to genetic relation (descent from a common ancestor language), to borrowing between languages, to retention of features when a population adopts a new language, or simply to chance. When little or no direct documentation of ancestor languages is available, determining whether a similarity is genetic or areal can be difficult
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J. P. Mallory
James Patrick Mallory (born 1945) is an Irish-American archaeologist and Indo-Europeanist. Mallory is an emeritus professor at Queen's University, Belfast,[1] a member of the Royal Irish Academy[2] and the editor of the Journal of Indo-European Studies[3] and Emania: Bulletin of the Navan Research Group (Belfast).[4]Contents1 Career 2 Personal life 3 Major works3.1 Books 3.2 Edited volumes 3.3 Articles and Chapters4 References 5 External linksCareer[edit] Mallory received his A.B. in History
History
from Occidental College
Occidental College
in California in 1967,[5] then served three years in the US Army
US Army
as a military police sergeant
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Pontic Steppe
The Pontic–Caspian steppe, Pontic steppe
Pontic steppe
or Ukrainian steppe is the vast steppeland stretching from the northern shores of the Black Sea (called Euxeinos Pontos [Εὔξεινος Πόντος] in antiquity) as far east as the Caspian Sea, from Moldova
Moldova
and eastern Ukraine across the Southern Federal District
Southern Federal District
and the Volga Federal District
Volga Federal District
of Russia
Russia
to western Kazakhstan, forming part of the larger Eurasian steppe, adjacent to the Kazakh steppe
Kazakh steppe
to the east. It is a part of the Palearctic temperate grasslands, savannas, and shrublands ecoregion of the temperate grasslands, savannas, and shrublands biome. The area corresponds to Cimmeria, Scythia, and Sarmatia
Sarmatia
of classical antiquity
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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