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Grade I Listed Building

A listed building, or listed structure, is one that has been placed on one of the four statutory lists maintained by Historic England in England, Historic Environment Scotland in Scotland, Cadw in Wales, and the Northern Ireland Environment Agency in Northern Ireland. The term has also been used in Ireland, where buildings are surveyed for the National Inventory of Architectural Heritage in accordance with the country's obligations under the Granada Convention. However, the preferred term in Ireland is protected structure.[1] A listed building may not be demolished, extended, or altered without special permission from the local planning authority, which typically consults the relevant central government agency, particularly for significant alterations to the more notable listed buildings
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Great Coxwell

Great Coxwell is a village and civil parish about 2 miles (3 km) southwest of Faringdon in the Vale of White Horse, England. It was in Berkshire until the 1974 boundary changes transferred it to Oxfordshire.[1] The 2001 Census recorded the parish's population as 274.[2]

The parish is 2 14 miles (3.6 km) long north – south and slightly more than 1 12 miles (2.4 km) wide east – west. Part of its southern boundary is formed by a stream that flows west to join the River Cole south of Coleshill, about 1 mile (1.6 km) west of the parish. The stream runs in the bottom of a valley that runs roughly from east to west
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St Mary's Church, Longworth
St Mary's Church is a Church of England parish church in Longworth, Oxfordshire (formerly Berkshire). The church is a Grade I listed building.[1] The oldest parts of the church date to the 13th-century. The current chancel, west tower, and north aisle were built in the 15th century.[1] The tower has a ring of five bells. Richard Keene of Woodstock cast the third, fourth and tenor bells in 1662. Henry III Bagley of Chacombe, Northamptonshire, cast the second bell in 1746, presumably at his foundry at Witney. James Wells of Aldbourne, Wiltshire, cast the treble bell in 1807. St Mary's has also a Sanctus bell that was cast in about 1890 by an unknown founder
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Longworth

Longworth is a village and civil parish in the Vale of White Horse, England. It was part of Berkshire until the 1974 boundary changes transferred it to Oxfordshire. The village lies about 7 miles (11 km) west of Abingdon-on-Thames and 9 miles (14 km) south-west of Oxford. The 2011 Census recorded the parish population as 566.[1] The parish is bounded by the River Thames to the north, the A420 road to the south, and field boundaries to the east and west
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Milton, Vale Of White Horse

Milton is a village and civil parish about 3 miles (5 km) west of Didcot and a similar distance south of Abingdon. The 2011 Census recorded the parish's population as 1,290.[1]

From the 10th to the 13th century the village's name was Middeltune. From the 13th to the 15th century it evolved as Middelton and Midelton, and from the 15th century to the 17th century it was Mylton.[2] On land near Sutton Road, northeast of the village, is the site of an Anglo-Saxon cemetery. Archaeologists had investigated the western part of the cemetery by the early 1930s.[3] In 2014 what appeared to be the easternmost part of the cemetery was found and more than 40 human burials were excavated
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Shellingford

Shellingford, historically also spelt Shillingford, is a village and civil parish about 2 12 miles (4 km) south-east of Faringdon in the Vale of White Horse in Oxfordshire, England. It was part of Berkshire until the 1974 Local Government Act transferred it to Oxfordshire. The 2011 Census recorded the parish's population as 173.[1] In the 10th century the toponym was spelt Scaringaford and in the 11th century it was Serengeford. 13th century forms of the name included Salingeford, Schalingeford, Shallingford, Sallingford and Schillingford. In the 18th century it was recorded as Shillingworth.[2] The spelling Shillingford has been discontinued to avoid confusion with the village of Shillingford near Wallingford, also in Oxfordshire.

Abingdon Abbey held the manor of Shellingford from 931 to 1538. In 1598 the courtier Sir Henry Neville bought the manor
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Shrivenham

Shrivenham is a village and civil parish in the Vale of White Horse, Oxfordshire, about 5 miles (8 km) southwest of Faringdon. The village is close to the county boundary with Wiltshire and about 7 miles (11 km) east-northeast of Swindon. The 2011 Census recorded the parish population as 2,347.[1] Shrivenham is located within the historic boundaries of Berkshire. The 1974 boundary changes transferred the Vale of White Horse to Oxfordshire for the purposes of administration.

The Prince of Wales public house
The Barrington Arms public house
Shrivenham has numerous thatched cottages, stone walls, an historic pump and a parish church that is unusual for having been rebuilt in the 17th century
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Sparsholt, Oxfordshire

Sparsholt is a village and civil parish about 3 miles (5 km) west of Wantage in the Vale of White Horse district of Oxfordshire. The parish includes the hamlet of Westcot about 12 mile (800 m) west of the village. Sparsholt was part of Berkshire until the 1974 boundary changes transferred the Vale of White Horse to Oxfordshire.

Sparsholt village is a spring line settlement at the foot of the Berkshire Downs escarpment. The parish measures more than 5 miles (8 km) miles north – south but less than 1 mile (1.6 km) east – west. It is bounded to the north by Stutfield Brook, a tributary of the River Ock. On other sides it is bounded by field boundaries
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Steventon, Oxfordshire
Steventon is a village and civil parish in Oxfordshire, England, about 4 miles (6.4 km) south of Abingdon and a similar distance west of Didcot. It was part of Berkshire until the 1974 boundary changes transferred it to Oxfordshire. The 2011 Census recorded the parish population as 1,485.[1] Steventon's toponym evolved from Stivetune in the 11th century via Estiventona in the 12th century, Stiveton, Stivington, Estiventon, Stiventon, Stuvinton and Steveington in the 13th century and Stephyngton in the 16th century before reaching its present form.[2] Steventon Priory was founded early in the 12th century in the reign of Henry I. It was an alien priory, controlled by the Benedictine Bec Abbey in Normandy
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Sutton Courtenay

Sutton Courtenay is a village and civil parish on the River Thames 2 miles (3 km) south of Abingdon-on-Thames and 3 miles (5 km) northwest of Didcot. Historically part of Berkshire, it has been administered as part of Oxfordshire since the 1974 boundary changes. The 2011 Census recorded the parish's population as 2,421.[1] Sutton Courtenay is home to some important structures, such as The Abbey, the Manor House, All Saints' Church, a twelfth-century Norman Hall and the Sutton Bridge.

A Neolithic stone hand axe was found at Sutton Courtenay. Petrological analysis in 1940 identified the stone as epidotised tuff from Stake Pass in the Lake District, 250 miles (400 km) to the north
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Uffington, Oxfordshire

The White Horse is one of the United Kingdom's best-known archaeoloThe 2011 Census recorded the parish's population as 783.[1] It was originally in the county of Berkshire, but under the Local Government Act 1972 it was transferred for local government purposes to Oxfordshire. The Uffington White Horse hill figure is on the Berkshire Downs on the south side of the parish. The village is about 1 mile (1.6 km) north of the foot of the Berkshire Downs escarpment and 1 14 miles (2 km) north of the B4507 road that links Wantage and Ashbury
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