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Grade II* Listed Buildings In South Yorkshire
There are over 20,000 Grade II* listed buildings in England
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Cantley, South Yorkshire
Cantley is a civil parish in the Metropolitan Borough of Doncaster in South Yorkshire, England. The village is adjacent to Bessacarr, separated by Bawtry Road
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Burghwallis
Burghwallis is a small village and civil parish in rural South Yorkshire, England. The population of the civil parish as of the 2011 census was 300. The village is situated amongst mixed farmland and woodland on a slight rise roughly six miles north north west of Doncaster, or one mile off the A1. The village church is dedicated to St Helen
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St James' Church, High Melton
St James' Church, High Melton is a parish church of the Church of England in High Melton, South Yorkshire, England.

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Tickhill Castle
Tickhill Castle was a castle in Tickhill, on the Nottingham/Yorkshire West Riding border, England and a prominent stronghold during the reign of King John.

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Hooton Pagnell
Hooton Pagnell is a village and civil parish in the Metropolitan Borough of Doncaster in South Yorkshire, England, on the border with West Yorkshire. It lies on the B6422 road, near South Elmsall and is located at approximately 53°34′N 1°16′W / 53.567°N 1.267°W / 53.567; -1.267, at an elevation of around 80 metres above sea level
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Wentworth Castle
Wentworth Castle is a grade-I listed country house, the former seat of the Earls of Strafford, at Stainborough, near Barnsley in South Yorkshire, England. It is now home to the Northern College for Residential and Community Education. An older house existed on the estate, then called Stainborough, when it was purchased by Thomas Wentworth, Baron Raby (later Earl of Strafford), in 1711. It was still called Stainborough in Jan Kip's engraved bird's-eye view of parterres and avenues, 1714, and in the first edition of Vitruvius Britannicus, 1715. The name was changed in 1731. The original name survives in the form of Stainborough Castle, a sham ruin constructed as a garden folly on the estate. The estate has been in the care of the Wentworth Castle Heritage Trust since 2001 and was open to the public year-round seven days a week
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