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Gorham, Maine
Gorham is a town in Cumberland County, Maine, United States. The population was 16,381 at the 2010 census. The 2012 estimate of Gorham's population was 16,667. In addition to its urban village center known as Gorham Village or simply "the Village," the town encompasses a number of smaller, unincorporated villages and hamlets with distinct historical identities, including South Gorham, West Gorham, Little Falls, White Rock, and North Gorham. Gorham is home to one of the three campuses of the University of Southern Maine
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New England Town
New England
New England
(United States):Connecticut Maine Massachusetts New Hampshire Rhode Island VermontFound in U.S. states in New EnglandCreated by Various colonial agreements followed by state constitutionsCreated 1620 (Plymouth, Massachusetts)Number More than 1,500 (as of 2016)Populations 41 (Hart's Location, New Hampshire) - 68,318 (Framingham, Massachusetts)Areas 1.2 sq mi. (Nahant, Massachusetts) - 291.2 sq mi. (Pittsburg, New Hampshire)Government Town meetingThis article has multiple issues. Please help improve it or discuss these issues on the talk page. (Learn how and when to remove these template messages)This article needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (April 2017) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)This article possibly contains original research
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French And Indian Wars
The French and Indian Wars
French and Indian Wars
is a name used in the United States
United States
for a series of conflicts that occurred in North America
North America
between 1688 and 1763 and were related to the European dynastic wars. The title French and Indian War in the singular is used in the United States specifically for the warfare of 1754–63, the North American colonial counterpart to the Seven Years' War
Seven Years' War
in Europe. The French and Indian Wars were preceded by the Beaver Wars. In Quebec, Canada, a former French colony, the wars are generally referred to as the War of the Conquest
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King Philip's War
Northern New England:1st Northeast Coast 2nd Northeast Coast 3rd Northeast Coast Port La Tour King Philip's War
King Philip's War
(sometimes called the First Indian War, Metacom's War, Metacomet's War, Pometacomet's Rebellion, or Metacom's Rebellion)[2] was an armed conflict in 1675–78 between American Indian inhabitants of the New England
New England
region of North America
North America
versus New England
New England
colonists and their Indian allies
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Sawmill
A sawmill or lumber mill is a facility where logs are cut into lumber. Before the invention of the sawmill, boards were made in various manual ways, either rived (split) and planed, hewn, or more often hand sawn by two men with a whipsaw, one above and another in a saw pit below. The earliest known mechanical mill is the Hierapolis
Hierapolis
sawmill, a Roman water-powered stone mill at Hierapolis, Asia Minor
Asia Minor
dating back to the 3rd century AD. Other water-powered mills followed and by the 11th century they were widespread in Spain and North Africa, the Middle East and Central Asia, and in the next few centuries, spread across Europe. The circular motion of the wheel was converted to a reciprocating motion at the saw blade. Generally, only the saw was powered, and the logs had to be loaded and moved by hand
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Moss
Mosses are small flowerless plants that typically grow in dense green clumps or mats, often in damp or shady locations. The individual plants are usually composed of simple leaves that are generally only one cell thick, attached to a stem that may be branched or unbranched and has only a limited role in conducting water and nutrients. Although some species have conducting tissues, these are generally poorly developed and structurally different from similar tissue found in vascular plants.[3] Mosses do not have seeds and after fertilisation develop sporophytes with unbranched stalks topped with single capsules containing spores
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Clay
Clay
Clay
is a finely-grained natural rock or soil material that combines one or more clay minerals with possible traces of quartz (SiO4), metal oxides (Al2O3 , MgO etc.) and organic matter. Geologic clay deposits are mostly composed of phyllosilicate minerals containing variable amounts of water trapped in the mineral structure. Clays are plastic due to particle size and geometry as well as water content, and become hard, brittle and non–plastic upon drying or firing.[1][2][3] Depending on the soil's content in which it is found, clay can appear in various colours from white to dull grey or brown to deep orange-red.Electron microscope photograph of smectite clay – magnification 23,500Although many naturally occurring deposits include both silts and clay, clays are distinguished from other fine-grained soils by differences in size and mineralogy
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Indigenous Peoples Of The Americas
The indigenous peoples of the Americas
Americas
are the pre-Columbian peoples of the Americas
Americas
and their descendants. Although some indigenous peoples of the Americas
Americas
were traditionally hunter-gatherers—and many, especially in the Amazon basin, still are—many groups practiced aquaculture and agriculture. The impact of their agricultural endowment to the world is a testament to their time and work in reshaping and cultivating the flora indigenous to the Americas.[24] Although some societies depended heavily on agriculture, others practiced a mix of farming, hunting and gathering
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King George's War
 France New FranceWabanaki Confederacy Great Britain British America Iroquois
Iroquois
ConfederacyCommanders and leadersFather Jean-Louis Le Loutre Father Pierre Maillard Louis Du Pont Duchambon Pierre Morpain William Pepperrell Peter Warrenv t eKing George's WarPlanned French invasion Canso Newfoundland Annapolis Royal 1st Annapolis Royal 2nd Port Toulouse 1st Louisbourg 2nd Louisbourg Tatamagouche 1st Northeast Coast Saratoga 2nd Northeast Coast Ile Saint-Jean d'Anville Expedition Fort Massachusetts Grand Pré Fort
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Meeting House
A meeting house (meetinghouse,[1] meeting-house[2]) is a building where religious and sometimes public meetings take place.Contents1 Meeting houses in America 2 The meeting house in England 3 See also 4 References 5 SourcesMeeting houses in America[edit]Old Town Friends Meetinghouse in BaltimoreThe colonial meeting house in America was typically the first public building built as new villages sprang up
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Treaty Of Paris (1763)
The Treaty of Paris, also known as the Treaty of 1763, was signed on 10 February 1763 by the kingdoms of Great Britain, France and Spain, with Portugal
Portugal
in agreement, after Great Britain's victory over France and Spain
Spain
during the Seven Years' War. The signing of the treaty formally ended the Seven Years' War, known as the French and Indian War
French and Indian War
in the North American theatre,[1] and marked the beginning of an era of British dominance outside Europe.[2] Great Britain and France each returned much of the territory that they had captured during the war, but Great Britain gained much of France's possessions in North America. Additionally, Great Britain agreed to protect Roman Catholicism in the New World
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United States Army Rangers
The United States Army
United States Army
Rangers are an elite rapid-deployment military formation of the United States Army, that serve in designated U.S. Army Ranger units or are graduates from the U.S. Army Ranger School.[1] The term ranger has been in use unofficially in a military context since the early 17th century. The first military company officially commissioned as rangers were English soldiers fighting in King Philip's War
King Philip's War
(1676) and from there the term came into common official use in the French and Indian Wars. There have been American military companies officially called Rangers since the American Revolution. The 75th Ranger Regiment
75th Ranger Regiment
is an elite airborne light infantry combat formation within the United States Army
United States Army
Special
Special
Operations Command (USASOC)
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Water Power
Hydropower
Hydropower
or water power (from Greek: ύδωρ, "water") is power derived from the energy of falling water or fast running water, which may be harnessed for useful purposes. Since ancient times, hydropower from many kinds of watermills has been used as a renewable energy source for irrigation and the operation of various mechanical devices, such as gristmills, sawmills, textile mills, trip hammers, dock cranes, domestic lifts, and ore mills. A trompe, which produces compressed air from falling water, is sometimes used to power other machinery at a distance.[1][2] In the late 19th century, hydropower became a source for generating electricity. Cragside
Cragside
in Northumberland was the first house powered by hydroelectricity in 1878[3] and the first commercial hydroelectric power plant was built at Niagara Falls
Niagara Falls
in 1879
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Lumber
Lumber
Lumber
(American English; used only in North America) or timber (used in the rest of the English speaking world) is a type of wood that has been processed into beams and planks, a stage in the process of wood production. Lumber
Lumber
is mainly used for structural purposes but has many other uses as well. There are two main types of lumber. It may be supplied either rough-sawn, or surfaced on one or more of its faces. Besides pulpwood, rough lumber is the raw material for furniture-making and other items requiring additional cutting and shaping
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Barrels
A barrel, cask, or tun is a hollow cylindrical container, traditionally made of wooden staves bound by wooden or metal hoops. Traditionally, the barrel was a standard size of measure referring to a set capacity or weight of a given commodity. For example, in the UK a barrel of beer refers to a quantity of 36 imperial gallons (160 L; 43 US gal). Wine
Wine
was shipped in barrels of 119 litres (31 US gal; 26 imp gal). Modern wooden barrels for wine-making are either made of French common oak (Quercus robur) and white oak (Quercus petraea) or from American white oak (Quercus alba) and have typically these standard sizes: "Bordeaux type" 225 litres (59 US gal; 49 imp gal), "Burgundy type" 228 litres (60 US gal; 50 imp gal) and " Cognac
Cognac
type" 300 litres (79 US gal; 66 imp gal)
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Carriages
A carriage is a wheeled vehicle for people, usually horse-drawn; litters (palanquins) and sedan chairs are excluded, since they are wheelless vehicles. The carriage is especially designed for private passenger use, though some are also used to transport goods. A public passenger vehicle would not usually be called a carriage – terms for such include stagecoach, charabanc and omnibus. It may be light, smart and fast or heavy, large and comfortable or luxurious. Carriages normally have suspension using leaf springs, elliptical springs (in the 19th century) or leather strapping
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