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Google Energy
Google Energy LLC is a subsidiary company of Alphabet Inc., which was created to reduce costs of energy consumption of the Google Group, and subsequently to produce and sell clean energy. The division also allows it to take advantage of projects funded through the philanthropic Google.org.Contents1 Operations 2 Authorization to buy and sell energy 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksOperations[edit] By 2007 Google had invested a substantial amount of money in wind, solar, solar thermal, and geothermal projects, including a 1.6 MW solar installation pilot project at its headquarters. In 2010 Google Energy made its first investment in a renewable-energy project, putting up US$38.8 million for two wind farms in North Dakota. The company announced that the two locations will generate 169.5 MW of power, or enough to supply 55,000 homes. The farms, which were developed by NextEra Energy Resources, will reduce fossil fuel use in the region
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Power Generation
Electricity generation
Electricity generation
is the process of generating electric power from sources of primary energy. For electric utilities in the electric power industry, it is the first stage in the delivery of electricity to end users, the other stages being transmission, distribution, energy storage and recovery, using pumped-storage methods. A characteristic of electricity is that it is not a primary energy freely present in nature in remarkable amounts and it must be produced. Production is carried out in power plants. Electricity is most often generated at a power station by electromechanical generators, primarily driven by heat engines fueled by combustion or nuclear fission but also by other means such as the kinetic energy of flowing water and wind
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United States Dollar
The United States
United States
dollar (sign: $; code: USD; also abbreviated US$ and referred to as the dollar, U.S. dollar, or American dollar) is the official currency of the United States
United States
and its territories per the United States
United States
Constitution since 1792. In practice, the dollar is divided into 100 smaller cent (¢) units, but is occasionally divided into 1000 mills (₥) for accounting. The circulating paper money consists of Federal Reserve
Federal Reserve
Notes that are denominated in United States dollars (12 U.S.C. § 418). Since the suspension in 1971[4] of convertibility of paper U.S. currency into any precious metal, the U.S. dollar is, de facto, fiat money.[5] As it is the most used in international transactions, the U.S
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Special
Special
Special
or the specials or variation, may refer to:.mw-parser-output .tocright float:right;clear:right;width:auto;background:none;padding:.5em 0 .8em 1.4em;margin-bottom:.5em .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-left clear:left .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-both clear:both .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-none clear:none Contents1 Policing 2 Literature 3 Film and television 4 Music4.1 Albums 4.2 Songs5 Computing 6 Other uses 7 See alsoPolicing[edit] Specials, Ulster
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NewsOK
The Oklahoman
The Oklahoman
is the largest daily newspaper in Oklahoma
Oklahoma
and is the only regional daily that covers the Greater Oklahoma
Oklahoma
City area.[citation needed] The Alliance for Audited Media (formerly Audit Bureau Circulation) lists it as the 59th largest U.S. newspaper in circulation.[citation needed] The Oklahoman, published by the Oklahoma Publishing Company (OPUBCO), circulation declined in the 5 years from 2007 to 2012.Contents1 Ownership 2 Headquarters 3 History 4 2016 announcement of outsourcing, printing plant closing 5 Drop in circulation 6 Awards 7 References 8 External linksOwnership[edit] The newspaper was founded in 1889 by Sam Small and taken over in 1903 by Edward K. Gaylord. Gaylord would run the paper for 71 years. Upon his death, the paper was turned over to his son and later to his granddaughter
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The Wall Street Journal
The Wall Street Journal
The Wall Street Journal
is a U.S. business-focused, English-language international daily newspaper based in New York City. The Journal, along with its Asian and European editions, is published six days a week by Dow Jones & Company, a division of News Corp. The newspaper is published in the broadsheet format and online. The Journal has been printed continuously since its inception on July 8, 1889, by Charles Dow, Edward Jones, and Charles Bergstresser. The Wall Street Journal
The Wall Street Journal
is one of the largest newspapers in the United States by circulation, with a circulation of about 2.617 million copies (including nearly 1,818,000 digital subscriptions) as of August 2019[update],[1] compared with USA Today's 1.7 million. The Journal publishes the luxury news and lifestyle magazine WSJ, which was originally launched as a quarterly but expanded to 12 issues as of 2014
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Federal Energy Regulatory Commission
The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission
Federal Energy Regulatory Commission
(FERC) is the United States federal agency that regulates the transmission and wholesale sale of electricity and natural gas in interstate commerce and regulates the transportation of oil by pipeline in interstate commerce. FERC also reviews proposals to build interstate natural gas pipelines, natural gas storage projects, and liquefied natural gas (LNG) terminals, in addition to licensing non-federal hydropower projects. FERC is composed of five commissioners who are nominated by the U.S. President and confirmed by the U.S. Senate
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SolarCity
SolarCity
SolarCity
Corporation is a subsidiary of Tesla, Inc.
Tesla, Inc.
that specializes in solar energy services and is headquartered in San Mateo, California. SolarCity
SolarCity
markets, manufactures, and installs residential and commercial solar panels in the US. In 2016, the company merged with Tesla, Inc.
Tesla, Inc.
and now offers energy storage services through Tesla, including a turnkey residential battery backup service that incorporates Tesla's Powerwall
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Power Purchase Agreement
A power purchase agreement (PPA), or electricity power agreement, is a contract between two parties, one which generates electricity (the seller) and one which is looking to purchase electricity (the buyer). The PPA defines all of the commercial terms for the sale of electricity between the two parties, including when the project will begin commercial operation, schedule for delivery of electricity, penalties for under delivery, payment terms, and termination
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Renewable Energy
2016 World [civil] power generation by source [IEA, 2018] (Percentages of 24.973 TWh)[1]   Coal
Coal
(38.4%)  Natural Gas (23.2%)  Hydro (16.3%)  Nuclear fission (10.4%)  Oil (3.7%)  Non hydro renew
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North Dakota
North Dakota
North Dakota
( /- dəˈkoʊtə/ ( listen)) is a U.S. state in the midwestern and northern regions of the United States. It is the nineteenth largest in area, the fourth smallest by population, and the fourth most sparsely populated of the 50 states. North Dakota
North Dakota
was admitted as the 39th state to the Union on November 2, 1889
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Geothermal Power
Geothermal power
Geothermal power
is power generated by geothermal energy. Technologies in use include dry steam power stations, flash steam power stations and binary cycle power stations. Geothermal electricity generation is currently used in 24 countries,[1] while geothermal heating is in use in 70 countries.[2] As of 2015, worldwide geothermal power capacity amounts to 12.8 gigawatts (GW), of which 28 percent or 3,548 megawatts are installed in the United States
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Solar Thermal
Solar thermal
Solar thermal
energy (STE) is a form of energy and a technology for harnessing solar energy to generate thermal energy or electrical energy for use in industry, and in the residential and commercial sectors.Contents1 Overview 2 History 3 Low-temperature solar heating and cooling systems3.1 Low-temperature collectors 3.2 Heat storage in low-temperature solar thermal systems 3.3 Solar-driven cooling 3.4 Solar heat-driven ventilation 3.5 Process heat4 Medium-temperature collectors4.1 Solar drying 4.2 Cooking 4.3
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Solar Power
Solar power
Solar power
is the conversion of energy from sunlight into electricity, either directly using photovoltaics (PV), indirectly using concentrated solar power, or a combination. Concentrated solar power systems use lenses or mirrors and tracking systems to focus a large area of sunlight into a small beam. Photovoltaic
Photovoltaic
cells convert light into an electric current using the photovoltaic effect.[1] Photovoltaics
Photovoltaics
were initially solely used as a source of electricity for small and medium-sized applications, from the calculator powered by a single solar cell to remote homes powered by an off-grid rooftop PV system. Commercial concentrated solar power plants were first developed in the 1980s
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Wind Power
Wind
Wind
power is the use of air flow through wind turbines to mechanically power generators for electric power. Wind
Wind
power, as an alternative to burning fossil fuels, is plentiful, renewable, widely distributed, clean, produces no greenhouse gas emissions during operation, consumes no water, and uses little land.[2] The net effects on the environment are far less problematic than those of nonrenewable power sources. Wind
Wind
farms consist of many individual wind turbines, which are connected to the electric power transmission network. Onshore wind is an inexpensive source of electric power, competitive with or in many places cheaper than coal or gas plants.[3][4][5] Offshore wind is steadier and stronger than on land, and offshore farms have less visual impact, but construction and maintenance costs are considerably higher
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Clean Energy
Sustainable energy
Sustainable energy
is energy that is consumed at insignificant rates compared to its supply and with manageable collateral effects, especially environmental effects. Another common definition of sustainable energy is an energy system that serves the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their needs.[1] Renewable energy
Renewable energy
is not a synonym of sustainable energy. While renewable energy is defined as one that is naturally replenished on a human timescale, sustainable (often referred to as 'clean') energy is one the use of which will not compromise the system in which it is adopted to the point of not being fit to provide needs in the future
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