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Goldman Sachs
Goldman Sachs
Goldman Sachs
Group, Inc. is an American multinational investment bank and financial services company headquartered in New York City. Apart from investment banking, it offers services in investment management, securities, asset management, prime brokerage, and securities underwriting. As a "Bulge Bracket Bank", it is one of the largest investment banking enterprises in the world.[4][5] It is considered a primary dealer in the United States Treasury security
United States Treasury security
market and more generally, a prominent market maker. The bank owns a direct bank known as GS Bank USA through which it maintenues its online banking presence
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List Of Business Entities
A business entity is an entity that is formed and administered as per corporate law in order to engage in business activities, charitable work, or other activities allowable. Most often, business entities are formed to sell a product or a service. There are many types of business entities defined in the legal systems of various countries. These include corporations, cooperatives, partnerships, sole traders, limited liability company and other specifically permitted and labelled types of entities. The specific rules vary by country and by state or province
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Asset
In financial accounting, an asset is any resource owned by the business. Anything tangible or intangible that can be owned or controlled to produce value and that is held by a company to produce positive economic value is an asset. Simply stated, assets represent value of ownership that can be converted into cash (although cash itself is also considered an asset).[1] The balance sheet of a firm records the monetary[2] value of the assets owned by that firm. It covers money and other valuables belonging to an individual or to a business.[1] One can classify assets into two major asset classes: tangible assets and intangible assets
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Asset Management
Asset
Asset
management, broadly defined, refers to any system that monitors and maintains things of value to an entity or group. It may apply to both tangible assets (such as buildings) and to intangible assets (such as human capital, intellectual property, goodwill and/or financial assets). Asset
Asset
management is a systematic process of developing, operating, maintaining, upgrading, and disposing of assets cost-effectively. The term is most commonly used in the financial sector to describe people and companies who manage investments on behalf of others
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Commodity
In economics, a commodity is an economic good or service that has full or substantial fungibility: that is, the market treats instances of the good as equivalent or nearly so with no regard to who produced them.[1] The price of a commodity good is typically determined as a function of its market as a whole: well-established physical commodities have actively traded spot and derivative markets
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Investment Management
Investment
Investment
management is the professional asset management of various securities (shares, bonds and other securities) and other assets (e.g., real estate) in order to meet specified investment goals for the benefit of the investors. Investors may be institutions (insurance companies, pension funds, corporations, charities, educational establishments etc.) or private investors (both directly via investment contracts and more commonly via collective investment schemes e.g. mutual funds or exchange-traded funds). The term asset management is often used to refer to the investment management of collective investments, while the more generic fund management may refer to all forms of institutional investment as well as investment management for private investors
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Mutual Fund
A mutual fund is a professionally managed investment fund that pools money from many investors to purchase securities. These investors may be retail or institutional in nature. Mutual funds have advantages and disadvantages compared to direct investing in individual securities. The primary advantages of mutual funds are that they provide economies of scale, a higher level of diversification, they provide liquidity, and they are managed by professional investors. On the negative side, investors in a mutual fund must pay various fees and expenses. Primary structures of mutual funds include open-end funds, unit investment trusts, and closed-end funds. Exchange-traded funds (ETFs) are open-end funds or unit investment trusts that trade on an exchange. Mutual funds are also classified by their principal investments as money market funds, bond or fixed income funds, stock or equity funds, hybrid funds or other
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United States Dollar
The United States
United States
dollar (sign: $; code: USD; also abbreviated US$ and referred to as the dollar, U.S. dollar, or American dollar) is the official currency of the United States
United States
and its territories per the United States
United States
Constitution since 1792. In practice, the dollar is divided into 100 smaller cent (¢) units, but is occasionally divided into 1000 mills (₥) for accounting. The circulating paper money consists of Federal Reserve
Federal Reserve
Notes that are denominated in United States dollars (12 U.S.C. § 418). Since the suspension in 1971[4] of convertibility of paper U.S. currency into any precious metal, the U.S. dollar is, de facto, fiat money.[5] As it is the most used in international transactions, the U.S
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Earnings Before Interest And Taxes
In accounting and finance, earnings before interest and taxes (EBIT) is a measure of a firm's profit that includes all incomes and expenses (operating and non-operating) except interest expenses and income tax expenses.[1][2] Operating income and operating profit are sometimes used as a synonym for EBIT when a firm does not have non-operating income and non-operating expenses.[3]Contents1 Formulae 2 Overview 3 Earnings before taxes 4 See also 5 ReferencesFormulae[edit] EBIT = Net income
Net income
+
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Net Income
In business and accounting, net income (also total comprehensive income, net earnings, net profit, bottom line, sales profit, or credit sales) is a measure of the profitability of a venture. It is an entity's income minus cost of goods sold, expenses (e.g., SG&A), depreciation & amortization, interest, and taxes for an accounting period.[1] It is computed as the residual of all revenues and gains over all expenses and losses for the period,[2] and has also been defined as the net increase in shareholders' equity that results from a company's operations.[3] It is different from the gross income, which only deducts the cost of goods sold. For households and individuals, net income refers to the (gross) income minus taxes and other deductions (e.g., mandatory pension contributions). It is usually the basis to calculate how much income tax is owed
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Equity (finance)
In accounting, equity (or owner's equity) is the difference between the value of the assets and the value of the liabilities of something owned. It is governed by the following equation: equity = assets value − liabilities displaystyle text equity = text assets value - text liabilities For example, if someone owns a car worth $15,000 (an asset), but owes $5,000 on a loan against that car (a liability), the car represents $10,000 of equity. Equity can be negative if liabilities exceed assets. Shareholders' equity (or stockholders' equity, shareholders' funds, shareholders' capital or similar terms) represents the equity of a company as divided among shareholders of common or preferred stock. Negative shareholders' equity is often referred to as a shareholders' deficit. Alternatively, equity can also refer to a corporation's share capital (capital stock in American English)
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Chief Financial Officer
The chief financial officer (CFO) is the officer of a company that has primary responsibility for managing the company's finances, including financial planning, management of financial risks, record-keeping, and financial reporting. In some sectors, the CFO is also responsible for analysis of data. Some CFOs have the title CFOO for chief financial and operating officer.[1] In the United Kingdom, the typical term for a CFO is finance director (FD). The CFO typically reports to the chief executive officer (CEO) and the board of directors and may additionally have a seat on the board. The CFO supervises the finance unit and is the chief financial spokesperson for the organization
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Basel III
Basel III (or the Third Basel Accord or Basel Standards) is a global, voluntary regulatory framework on bank capital adequacy, stress testing, and market liquidity risk. This third installment of the Basel Accords (see Basel I, Basel II) was developed in response to the deficiencies in financial regulation revealed by the financial crisis of 2007–08
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Standard & Poor's
Standard & Poor's Financial Services LLC (S&P) is an American financial services company. It is a division of S&P Global that publishes financial research and analysis on stocks, bonds, and commodities. S&P is known for its stock market indices such as the U.S.-based S&P 500, the Canadian S&P/TSX, and the Australian S&P/ASX 200. S&P is considered one of the Big Three credit-rating agencies, which also include Moody's Investors Service and Fitch Ratings.[2] Its head office is located on 55 Water Street
55 Water Street
in Lower Manhattan, New York City.[3]Contents1 History 2 Credit ratings2.1 Long-term credit ratings 2.2 Short-term issue credit ratings3 Stock
Stock
market indices 4 Governance scores4.1 CGS scores 4.2 GAMMA scores 4.3 Management and Governance criteria5 Downgrade of U.S
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Moody's Investors Service
Moody's Investors Service, often referred to as Moody's, is the bond credit rating business of Moody's Corporation, representing the company's traditional line of business and its historical name. Moody's Investors Service provides international financial research on bonds issued by commercial and government entities. Moody's, along with Standard & Poor's and Fitch Group, is considered one of the Big Three credit rating agencies. The company ranks the creditworthiness of borrowers using a standardized ratings scale which measures expected investor loss in the event of default. Moody's Investors Service rates debt securities in several bond market segments
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Fitch Ratings
Fitch Ratings
Fitch Ratings
Inc. is one of the "Big Three credit rating agencies",[3] the other two being Moody's and Standard & Poor's. It is one of the three nationally recognized statistical rating organizations (NRSRO) designated by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission in 1975. Fitch Ratings
Fitch Ratings
is dual-headquartered in New York, USA, and London, UK.[4] Hearst owns 80% of the company following its acquisition of an additional 30 percent on December 12, 2014, in a transaction valued at $1.965 billion
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