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Godparent
A godparent (also known as a sponsor),[1] in many denominations of Christianity, is someone who bears witness to a child's baptism, although the term has also been used in a legal sense.[2] In both religious and civil views, a godparent tends to be an individual chosen by the parents to take an interest in the child's upbringing and personal development, and to take care of the child should anything happen to the parents. [3][4] A male godparent is a godfather, and a female godparent is a godmother. The child is a godchild (i.e
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Godson (other)
Godson may refer to:Dean Godson, a British journalist Francis Godson (1864-1953), a Methodist minister in Barbados Loongson, a brand of CPU chips The Godson (film), 1998 comedy film John Godson, Polish member of parliament Richard Godson, was the first Member of Parliament for Kidderminster after the 1832 Reform ActSee also[edit]Godson (surname)This disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title Godson. If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the
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Continental Reformed
A Continental Reformed church is a Reformed church that has its origin in the European continent. Prominent subgroups are the Dutch Reformed, the Swiss Reformed, the French Reformed (Huguenots), the Hungarian Reformed, and the Waldensian Church in Italy. The term is used to distinguish these churches from Presbyterian, Congregational or other Calvinist churches, which can trace their origin to the British Isles or elsewhere in the world. Continental Reformed churches are descended from the Protestant Reformation in respective European countries. Notably, their theology is largely derived from the Swiss Reformation, as Switzerland (specifically Geneva and Zürich) was a base for the most influential Reformed theologians of the era. It was inaugurated by Huldrych Zwingli, who formulated the first expression of the Reformed faith. Swiss Reformation was more fully articulated by Martin Bucer, Heinrich Bullinger and John Calvin
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Book Of Discipline (United Methodist)
The Book of Discipline constitutes the law and doctrine of the United Methodist Church.[1] It follows similar works for its predecessor denominations. It was originally published in 1784, in the Methodist Episcopal Church, and has been published every four years thereafter following the meeting of the General Conference, which passes legislation that is included in the Book of Discipline. The most recent edition is that of 2016.[2] [3] The basic unit of reference is the paragraph, not the page, chapter or section. The paragraphs are numbered consecutively within each chapter or section,[4] but numbers are skipped between chapters or sections. The paragraph is often only a few lines, but many are several pages long and they can be divided into multiple subdivisions
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Born Again
In some Christian movements, particularly in Evangelicalism, to be born again is a popular phrase referring to "spiritual rebirth", or a regeneration of the human spirit from the Holy Spirit, contrasted with physical birth. In contemporary Christian usage, the term is distinct from sometimes similar terms used in mainstream Christianity
Christianity
to refer to being or becoming Christian, which is linked to baptism
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John Wesley
John Wesley
John Wesley
(/ˈdʒɒn ˈwɛsli, -wɛz-/;[1] 28 June [O.S. 17 June] 1703 – 2 March 1791) was an English cleric and theologian who, with his brother Charles and fellow cleric George Whitefield, founded Methodism. Educated at Charterhouse School
Charterhouse School
and Christ Church, Oxford, Wesley was elected a fellow of Lincoln College, Oxford
Lincoln College, Oxford
in 1726 and ordained as an Anglican
Anglican
priest two years later. He led the "Holy Club", a society formed for the purpose of study and the pursuit of a devout Christian life; it had been founded by his brother Charles, and counted George Whitefield among its members. After an unsuccessful ministry of two years at Savannah in the Georgia Colony, Wesley returned to London and joined a religious society led by Moravian Christians
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Methodist Church
Methodism
Methodism
or the Methodist movement is a group of historically related denominations of Protestant
Protestant
Christianity
Christianity
which derive their inspiration from the life and teachings of John Wesley, an Anglican minister in England. George Whitefield
George Whitefield
and John Wesley's brother Charles Wesley
Charles Wesley
were also significant early leaders in the movement. It originated as a revival within the 18th century Church of England
Church of England
and became a separate denomination after Wesley's death. The movement spread throughout the British Empire, the United States, and beyond because of vigorous missionary work,[1] today claiming approximately 80 million adherents worldwide.[2][nb 1] Wesley's theology focused on sanctification and the effect of faith on the character of a Christian
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Nicene Creed
The Nicene Creed
Creed
(Greek: Σύμβολον τῆς Νικαίας or, τῆς πίστεως, Latin: Symbolum Nicaenum) is a statement of belief widely used in Christian liturgy. It is called Nicene /ˈnaɪsiːn/ because it was originally adopted in the city of Nicaea (present day İznik, Turkey) by the First Council of Nicaea
First Council of Nicaea
in 325.[1] In 381, it was amended at the First Council of Constantinople, and the amended form is referred to as the Nicene or the Niceno-Constantinopolitan Creed. The Oriental Orthodox and Assyrian churches use this profession of faith with the verbs in the original plural ("we believe") form, but the Eastern Orthodox and Catholic churches convert those verbs to the singular ("I believe")
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Lord's Prayer
The Lord's Prayer
Lord's Prayer
(also called the Our Father or Pater Noster, among other names) is a venerated Christian prayer
Christian prayer
that, according to the New Testament, Jesus
Jesus
taught as the way to pray.[1] Two versions of this prayer are recorded: the long form in the Gospel of Matthew
Gospel of Matthew
in the middle of the Sermon
Sermon
on the Mount, and the short form in the Gospel of Luke
Gospel of Luke
when "one of his disciples said to him, 'Lord, teach us to pray, as John taught his disciples.'"[2] The first three of the seven petitions in Matthew address God; the other four are related to human needs and concerns. The Matthew account alone includes the "Your will be done" and the "Rescue us from the evil one" (or "Deliver us from evil") petitions
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Ten Commandments
The Ten
The Ten
Commandments, also known as the Decalogue, are a set of biblical laws relating to ethics and worship, which play a fundamental role in Judaism
Judaism
and Christianity. The commandments include instructions to worship only God, to honour one's parents, and to keep the sabbath, as well as prohibitions against idolatry, blasphemy, murder, adultery, theft, dishonesty, and coveting. Different religious groups follow different traditions for interpreting and numbering them. The Ten
The Ten
Commandments appear twice in the Hebrew Bible, in the books of Exodus and Deuteronomy
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The United Methodist Book Of Worship (1992)
The United Methodist Book of Worship (1992) is the official liturgy of The United Methodist Church. It contains services for sacraments and rites of the church such as Holy Communion, Baptism, Confirmation, Marriage, Healing (anointing) Services, and Ordination. The Book of Worship also contains the daily office or "Praise and Prayer" services for Morning, Midday, Evening, and Night, as well as prayers, services, Scripture readings, and resources for various special days throughout the Christian year. John Wesley, Anglican priest and founder of early Methodism, gave American Methodism its first worship book in The Sunday Service of the Methodists in North America [London, 1784], a revision of The Book of Common Prayer, that has shaped Methodist worship every since. As acknowledged in the Preface, this Anglican influence can still been seen in The Book of Worship
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Reformed
Calvinism
Calvinism
(also called the Reformed tradition, Reformed Christianity, Reformed Protestantism, or the Reformed faith) is a major branch of Protestantism
Protestantism
that follows the theological tradition and forms of Christian practice of John Calvin
John Calvin
and other Reformation-era theologians. Calvinists broke from the Roman Catholic Church
Catholic Church
in the 16th century. Calvinists differ from Lutherans on the real presence of Christ
Christ
in the Eucharist, theories of worship, and the use of God's law for believers, among other things.[1][2] As declared in the Westminster and Second Helvetic confessions, the core doctrines are predestination and election
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Congregationalist
Congregational churches (also Congregationalist churches; Congregationalism) are Protestant churches in the Reformed tradition practicing congregationalist church governance, in which each congregation independently and autonomously runs its own affairs. In the United States and the United Kingdom, many Congregational churches claim their descent from Protestant denominations formed on a theory of union published by the theologian and English separatist Robert Browne in 1582.[1] Ideas of nonconforming Protestants during the Puritan
Puritan
Reformation
Reformation
of the Church of England
Church of England
laid foundation for these churches. In England, the early Congregationalists were called Separatists or Independents to distinguish them from the similarly Calvinistic Presbyterians, whose churches embrace a polity based on the governance of elders
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Earl Cain
Earl Cain (Japanese: 伯爵カインシリーズ, Hepburn: Hakushaku Kain Shirīzu), also known as Count Cain, is a shōjo manga series written and illustrated by Kaori Yuki. Earl Cain consists of five parts or "Series": Forgotten Juliet (忘れられたジュリエット, Wasurerareta Jurietto), The Sound of a Boy Hatching (少年の孵化する音, Shōnen no Fukasuru Oto), Kafka (カフカ, Kafuka), The Seal of the Red Ram (赤い羊の刻印, Akai Hitsuji no Kokuin), and the sequel series Godchild (ゴッド チャイルド, Goddo Chairudo). Debuting in the Japanese manga magazine Bessatsu Hana to Yume in December 1991, the manga was eventually transferred to Hana to Yume, where it ran until 1994; the chapters of the sequel, Godchild, appeared between the May 2001 issue and the October 2003 issue in Hana to Yume. Together, the series spans 13 tankōbon volumes, with five for Forgotten Juliet, The Sound of a Boy Hatching, Kafka, and The Seal of the Red Ram and eight for Godchild
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Presbyterian
Presbyterianism
Presbyterianism
is a part of the Reformed tradition
Reformed tradition
within Protestantism
Protestantism
which traces its origins to the British Isles, particularly Scotland. Presbyterian churches derive their name from the presbyterian form of church government, which is governed by representative assemblies of elders. A great number of Reformed churches
Reformed churches
are organized this way, but the word Presbyterian, when capitalized, is often applied uniquely to churches that trace their roots to the Scottish and English Presbyterians, as well as several English dissenter groups that formed during the English Civil War.[2] Presbyterian theology typically emphasizes the sovereignty of God, the authority of the Scriptures, and the necessity of grace through faith in Christ
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Geneva
Geneva
Geneva
(/dʒɪˈniːvə/, French: Genève [ʒənɛv], Arpitan: Genèva [dzəˈnɛva], German: Genf [ɡɛnf], Italian: Ginevra [dʒiˈneːvra], Romansh: Genevra) is the second-most populous city in Switzerland
Switzerland
(after Zürich) and is the most populous city of the Romandy, the French-speaking part of Switzerland
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