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God In Judaism
In Judaism, God
God
is understood to be the absolute one, indivisible, and incomparable being who is the ultimate cause of all existence. Judaism holds that YHWH, the god of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob
Jacob
and the national god of the Israelites, delivered the Israelites
Israelites
from slavery in Egypt, and gave them the Law of Moses
Moses
at biblical Mount Sinai as described in the Torah. Traditional interpretations of Judaism
Judaism
generally emphasize that God
God
is personal, while some modern interpretations of Judaism emphasize that God
God
is a force or ideal.[1] The name of God
God
used most often in the Hebrew Bible
Hebrew Bible
is the Tetragrammaton
Tetragrammaton
( YHWH
YHWH
Hebrew: יהוה)
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Hebron
Hebron
Hebron
(Arabic: الْخَلِيل‎  al-Khalīl; Hebrew: חֶבְרוֹן‬  Ḥevron) is a Palestinian[4][5][6][7] city located in the southern West Bank, 30 km (19 mi) south of Jerusalem. Nestled in the Judaean Mountains, it lies 930 meters (3,050 ft) above sea level
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Aruch HaShulchan
Aruch HaShulchan
Aruch HaShulchan
(Hebrew: עָרוּךְ הַשֻּׁלְחָן [or, arguably, עָרֹךְ הַשֻּׁלְחָן; see Title below]) is a chapter-to-chapter restatement of the Shulchan Aruch
Shulchan Aruch
(the latter being the most influential codification of halakhah in the post-Talmudic era)
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Piyyut
A piyyut or piyut (plural piyyutim or piyutim, Hebrew: פִּיּוּטִים / פיוטים, פִּיּוּט / פיוט‬ pronounced [piˈjut, pijuˈtim]; from Greek ποιητής poiētḗs "poet") is a Jewish liturgical poem, usually designated to be sung, chanted, or recited during religious services. Piyyutim have been written since Temple times. Most piyyutim are in Hebrew or Aramaic, and most follow some poetic scheme, such as an acrostic following the order of the Hebrew alphabet
Hebrew alphabet
or spelling out the name of the author. Many piyyutim are familiar to regular attendees of synagogue services. For example, the best-known piyyut may be Adon Olam
Adon Olam
("Master of the World"), sometimes (but almost certainly wrongly) attributed to Solomon ibn Gabirol
Solomon ibn Gabirol
in 11th century Spain
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Tosefta
—— Tannaitic ——Mishnah Tosefta—— Amoraic (Gemara) ——Jerusalem Talmud Babylonian Talmud—— Later ——Minor TractatesHalakhic Midrash—— Exodus ——Mekhilta of Rabbi Ishmael Mekhilta of Rabbi Shimon
Mekhilta of Rabbi Shimon
bar Yohai—— Leviticus —— Sifra
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Mishnah Berurah
The Mishnah Berurah
Mishnah Berurah
(Hebrew: משנה ברורה‎ "Clarified Teaching") is a work of halakha (Jewish law) by Rabbi
Rabbi
Yisrael Meir Kagan (Poland, 1838–1933), also colloquially known by the name of another of his books, Chofetz Chaim "Desirer of Life"
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Outline Of Judaism
Outline
Outline
may refer to: Outline
Outline
(list), a document summary, in hierarchical list format Outline
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Safed
Safed
Safed
(Hebrew: צְפַת‬ Tsfat, Ashkenazi: Tzfas, Biblical: Ṣ'fath; Arabic: صفد‎, Ṣafad) is a city in the Northern District of Israel
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Hasidic Judaism
Hasidism, sometimes Hasidic Judaism
Judaism
(Hebrew: חסידות‎, translit. hasidut, [χaˈsidus]; originally, "piety"), is a Jewish religious group. It arose as a spiritual revival movement in contemporary Western Ukraine
Western Ukraine
during the 18th century, and spread rapidly throughout Eastern Europe. Today, most affiliates reside in the United States, Israel, and the United Kingdom. Israel
Israel
Ben Eliezer, the " Baal Shem
Baal Shem
Tov", is regarded as its founding father, and his disciples developed and disseminated it. Present-day Hasidism is a sub-group within Ultra-Orthodox ("Haredi") Judaism, and is noted for its religious conservatism and social seclusion
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Tzniut
Tzniut
Tzniut
(Hebrew: צניעות‬, tzniut, Sephardi
Sephardi
pronunciation, tzeniut(h); Ashkenazi
Ashkenazi
pronunciation, tznius, "modesty", or "privacy") describes both the character trait of modesty and humility, as well as a group of Jewish laws pertaining to conduct in general, and especially between the sexes. The term is frequently used with regard to the rules of dress for women within Judaism
Judaism
and has its greatest influence as a concept within Orthodox Judaism.Contents1 Hebrew Bible and Talmud 2 Description 3 Practical applications3.1 Dress 3.2 Hair covering 3.3 Female singing voice3.3.1 Orthodox Judaism 3.3.2 Other denominations3.4 Touch 3.5 Yichud 3.6 Synagogue
Synagogue
services4 Observances 5 See also 6 Footnotes 7 ReferencesHebrew Bible and Talmud[edit] Humility
Humility
is a paramount ideal within Judaism
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Tzedakah
Tzedakah
Tzedakah
[tsedaˈka] or Ṣ'daqah [sˤəðaːˈqaː] in Classical Hebrew (Hebrew: צדקה‎, is a Hebrew word literally meaning justice or righteousness but commonly used to signify charity - [1] though it is a different concept from the modern English understanding of "charity," which is typically understood as a spontaneous act of goodwill and a marker of generosity, where as tzedakah is an obligation. In Judaism, tzedakah refers to the religious obligation to do what is right and just, which Judaism
Judaism
emphasizes is an important part of living a spiritual life. Unlike voluntary philanthropy, tzedakah is seen as a religious obligation that must be performed regardless of financial standing, even by poor people
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Seven Laws Of Noah
The Seven Laws of Noah
Noah
(Hebrew: שבע מצוות בני נח‬ Sheva Mitzvot B'nei Noach), also referred to as the Noahide Laws or the Noachide Laws (from the English transliteration of the Hebrew pronunciation of "Noah"), are a set of imperatives which, according to the Talmud, were given by God[1] as a binding set of laws for the "children of Noah" – that is, all of humanity.[2][3] Accordingly, any non-Jew who adheres to these laws because they were given by Moses[4] is regarded as a righteous gentile, and is assured of a place in the world to come (עולם הבא‬ Olam Haba), the final reward of the righteous.[5][6] The seven Noahide laws as traditionally enumerated are th
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Mishneh Torah
The Mishneh Torah
Torah
(Hebrew: מִשְׁנֵה תּוֹרָה‎, "Repetition of the Torah"), subtitled Sefer Yad ha-Hazaka (ספר יד החזקה " Book
Book
of the Strong Hand"), is a code of Jewish religious law (Halakha) authored by Maimonides
Maimonides
( Rabbi
Rabbi
Moshe ben Maimon, also known as RaMBaM or "Rambam"). The Mishneh Torah
Torah
was compiled between 1170 and 1180 (4930–4940), while Maimonides
Maimonides
was living in Egypt, and is regarded as Maimonides' magnum opus. Accordingly, later sources simply refer to the work as "Maimon", "Maimonides" or "RaMBaM", although Maimonides
Maimonides
composed other works. Mishneh Torah
Torah
consists of fourteen books, subdivided into sections, chapters, and paragraphs
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Four Holy Cities
The Four Holy Cities
Four Holy Cities
(Hebrew: ארבע ערי הקודש‎, Yiddish: פיר רוס שטעט‎) is the collective term in Jewish tradition applied to the cities of Jerusalem, Hebron, Safed
Safed
and, later, Tiberias, the four main centers of Jewish life after the Ottom
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Mishnah
—— Tannaitic ——Mishnah Tosefta—— Amoraic (Gemara) ——Jerusalem Talmud Babylonian Talmud—— Later ——Minor TractatesHalakhic Midrash—— Exodus ——Mekhilta of Rabbi
Rabbi
Ishmael Mekhilta of Rabbi Shimon
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