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God In Hinduism
The concept of God
God
in Hinduism
Hinduism
varies in its diverse traditions.[1][2][3] Hinduism
Hinduism
spans a wide range of beliefs such as henotheism, monotheism, polytheism, panentheism, pantheism, pandeism, monism, atheism and nontheism.[1][4][5] Forms of theism find mention in the Bhagavad Gita
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Hongjun Laozu
Hongjun Laozu (simplified Chinese: 鸿钧老祖; traditional Chinese: 鴻鈞老祖; pinyin: Hóngjūn Lǎozǔ; Wade–Giles: Hung-chün Lao-tsu) lit. "Ancestor of the Great Balance" is a deity in Chinese folk religion and Taoism, patriarch of the Three Pure Ones
Three Pure Ones
in Taoist mythology. Hongjun 鴻鈞 is a graphic variant of hungjun (simplified Chinese: 洪钧; traditional Chinese: 洪鈞; pinyin: hóngjūn; Wade–Giles: hung-chün) "primordial nature", as used in the Chinese idiom Xian you hongjun hou you tian 先有鸿钧后有天 "First there was Nature and then there was Heaven". Daoists mythologize Hongjun Laozu as the ancestor of xian "trancendents; immortals" (Werner 1922:133-134) and use the honorific name Hongyuan Laozu (simplified Chinese: 鸿元老祖; traditional Chinese: 鴻元老祖; pinyin: Hóngyuán Lǎozǔ; Wade–Giles: Hung-yuan Lao-tsu) "Great Primal Ancestor"
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Shangdi
Model humanity:Xian ZhenrenWen and wuPracticesFenxiang JingxiangFeng shui MiaohuiWu shamanismJitong mediumshipPrecious scrollsInstitutions and templesAssociations of good-doingLineage associations or churchesChinese temple Ancestral shrineChinese Folk Temples' AssociationFestivalsQingming Zhongyuan Zhongqiu Jiuhuangye Qixi Duanwu NianInternal traditions Major cultural formsChinese ancestral religionChinese communal deity religionChinese mother goddess worshipNortheast China
China
folk religionMain philosophical traditions:


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Mother Goddess
A mother goddess is a goddess who represents, or is a personification of nature, motherhood, fertility, creation, destruction or who embodies the bounty of the Earth. When equated with the Earth
Earth
or the natural world, such goddesses are sometimes referred to as Mother Earth
Earth
or as the Earth
Earth
Mother. There is difference of opinion between the academic and the popular conception of the term. The popular view is mainly driven by the Goddess
Goddess
movement and reads that primitive societies initially were matriarchal, worshipping a sovereign, nurturing, motherly earth goddess. This was based upon the nineteenth-century ideas of unilineal evolution of Johann Jakob Bachofen
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Chinese Theology
Model humanity:Xian ZhenrenWen and wuPracticesFenxiang JingxiangFeng shui MiaohuiWu shamanismJitong mediumshipPrecious scrollsInstitutions and templesAssociations of good-doingLineage associations or churchesChinese temple Ancestral shrineChinese Folk Temples' AssociationFestivalsQingming Zhongyuan Zhongqiu Jiuhuangye Qixi Duanwu NianInternal traditions Major cultural formsChinese ancestral religionChinese communal deity religionChinese mother goddess worshipNortheast China folk religionMain philosophical traditions: Confucianism
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Indian Religions
Indian religions
Indian religions
as a percentage of world population    Hinduism
Hinduism
(15%)    Buddhism
Buddhism
(7.1%)    Sikhism
Sikhism
(0.35%)    Jainism
Jainism
(0.06%)   Other (77.49%)Indian religions, sometimes also termed as Dharmic faiths or religions, are the religions that originated in the Indian subcontinent; namely Hinduism, Jainism, Buddhism
Buddhism
and Sikhism. [web 1][note 1] These religions are also all classified as Eastern religions
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Panpsychism
In philosophy, panpsychism is the view that consciousness, mind or soul (psyche) is a universal and primordial feature of all things. Panpsychists see themselves as minds in a world of mind. Panpsychism
Panpsychism
is one of the oldest philosophical theories, and has been ascribed to philosophers like Thales, Parmenides, Plato, Averroes, Spinoza, Leibniz
Leibniz
and William James. Panpsychism
Panpsychism
can also be seen in ancient philosophies such as Stoicism, Taoism, Vedanta
Vedanta
and Mahayana Buddhism
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God In Christianity
God
God
in Christianity
Christianity
is the eternal being who created and preserves all things
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Unitarianism
Unitarianism
Unitarianism
(from Latin unitas "unity, oneness", from unus "one") is historically a Christian
Christian
theological movement named for its belief that the God
God
in Christianity is one entity, as opposed to the Trinity (tri- from Latin tres "three") which defines God
God
as three persons in one being; the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.[1] Unitarian Christians, therefore, believe that Jesus
Jesus
was inspired by God
God
in his moral teachings, and he is a savior,[2][3] but he was a normal human being and not a deity or God
God
incarnate
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Tawhid
Tawhid
Tawhid
(Arabic: توحيد‎ tawḥīd, meaning "oneness [of God]” also romanized as tawheed, touheed or tevhid[1]) is the indivisible oneness concept of monotheism in Islam.[2] Tawhid
Tawhid
is the religion's central and single-most important concept, upon which a Muslim's entire faith rests
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Monad (philosophy)
Monad (from Greek μονάς monas, "singularity" in turn from μόνος monos, "alone"),[1] refers in cosmogony (creation theories) to the first being, divinity, or the totality of all beings. The concept was reportedly conceived by the Pythagoreans
Pythagoreans
and may refer variously to a single source acting alone, or to an indivisible origin, or to both. The concept was later adopted by other philosophers, such as Leibniz, who referred to the monad as an elementary particle
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Deus
Deus
Deus
( Latin
Latin
pronunciation: [ˈdeːʊs]) is Latin
Latin
for "god" or "deity". Latin
Latin
deus and dīvus "divine", are descended from Proto-Indo-European *deiwos, "celestial" or "shining", from the same root as *Dyēus, the reconstructed chief god of the Proto-Indo-European pantheon. In Classical Latin, deus (feminine dea) was a general noun[1] referring to a deity, while in technical usage a divus or diva was a figure who had become divine, such as a divinized emperor. In Late Latin, Deus
Deus
came to be used mostly for the Christian God
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Creator Deity
A creator deity or creator god (often called the Creator) is a deity or god responsible for the creation of the Earth, world, and universe in human mythology. In monotheism, the single God
God
is often also the creator
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Creator In Buddhism
Creator in Buddhism
Buddhism
is not Gautama Buddha. Buddhist
Buddhist
thought consistently rejects the notion of a creator deity.[1][2] It teaches the concept of gods, heavens and rebirths in its Saṃsāra
Saṃsāra
doctrine, but it considers none of these gods as a creator. Buddhism
Buddhism
posits that mundane deities such as Mahabrahma are misconstrued to be a creator.[3] Buddhism
Buddhism
states that the universe is created and governed by the five cosmic laws (Niyama Dhamma), namely Utu Niyama, Bija Niyama, Kamma Niyama, Citta Niyama, and Dhamma Niyama. These cosmic laws have been seen by many as the main difference between Buddhism and other religions. Creator in Pali
Pali
is Atthi Ajatang Abhutang Akatang Asamkhatang which means "a not-born, a not-brought-to-being, a not-made, a not-conditioned"
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Transtheism
Transtheism is a term coined by either philosopher Paul Tillich
Paul Tillich
or Indologist Heinrich Zimmer[1] referring to a system of thought or religious philosophy which is neither theistic, nor atheistic, but is beyond them. Zimmer applies the term to the theological system of Jainism, which is theistic in the limited sense that the gods exist, but become irrelevant as they are transcended by moksha (that is, a system which is not non-theistic, but in which the gods are not the highest spiritual instance)
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Omnism
Omnism is the recognition and respect of all religions; those who hold this belief are called omnists (or Omnists). The Oxford English Dictionary (OED) quotes as the term's earliest usage by English poet Philip J. Bailey: in 1839 "I am an Omnist, and believe in all religions".[1] In recent years, the term has been emerging anew, due to the interest of modern day self-described omnists who have rediscovered and begun to redefine the term. It can be thought of as syncretism taken to its logical extreme. However, it can also be seen as a way to accept the existence of various religions without believing in all that they profess to teach. Many omnists say that all religions contain truths, but that no one religion offers all that is truth.Contents1 Contemporary usage 2 Notable omnists 3 See also 4 ReferencesContemporary usage[edit] Contemporary usage has modified "belief in all religions" to refer more to an acceptance of the legitimacy of all religions
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