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Go Fish
Go Fish
Go Fish
or Fish is a card game usually played by two to five players,[1] although it can be played with up to 10 players. It can be played in about 5 to 15 minutes.Contents1 The game 2 Variations 3 Strategy 4 Special
Special
card decks 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksThe game[edit]Four cards of the same face value are known as a "book"Five cards are dealt from a standard 52-card deck to each player, or seven cards if there are four or fewer players.[2] The remaining cards are shared between the players, usually spread out in a disorderly pile referred to as the "ocean" or "pool".[2] The player whose turn it is to play asks another player for his or her cards of a particular face value. For example Alice may ask, "Bob, do you have any threes?" Alice must have at least one card of the rank she requested.[3] Bob must hand over all cards of that rank if possible
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Shedding-type Game
A shedding-type card game is a game in which the player's objective is to empty one's hand of all cards before all other players
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Three-card Monte
Three-card Monte
Three-card Monte
– also known as find the lady and three-card trick – is a confidence game in which the victim, or "mark", is tricked into betting a sum of money, on the assumption that they can find the "money card" among three face-down playing cards. It is the same as the shell game except that cards are used instead of shells.[1] In its full form, three-card Monte is an example of a classic "short con"[2] in which a shill pretends to conspire with the mark to cheat the dealer, while in fact conspiring with the dealer to cheat the mark. The mark has no chance whatsoever of winning, at any point in the game
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Decision Making
In psychology, decision-making (also spelled decision making and decisionmaking) is regarded as the cognitive process resulting in the selection of a belief or a course of action among several alternative possibilities. Every decision-making process produces a final choice, which may or may not prompt action. Decision-making
Decision-making
is the process of identifying and choosing alternatives based on the values, preferences and beliefs of the decision-maker.Contents1 Overview 2 Problem analysis2.1 Analysis paralysis 2.2 Information overload 2.3 Post-decision analysis3 Decision-making
Decision-making
techniques3.1 Group 3.2 Individual4 Steps4.1 GOFER 4.2 DECIDE 4.3 Other 4.4 Group stages5 Rational and irrational 6 Cognitive and personal biases 7 Cognitive limitations in groups 8 Cognitive styles8.1 Optimizing
Optimizing
vs. satisficing 8.2 Intuitive vs. rational 8.3 Combinatorial vs
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Memory
Memory
Memory
is the faculty of the mind by which information is encoded, stored, and retrieved. Memory
Memory
is vital to experiences and related to limbic systems, it is the retention of information over time for the purpose of influencing future action.[1] If we could not remember past events, we could not learn or develop language, relationships, nor personal identity (Eysenck, 2012). Often memory is understood as an informational processing system with explicit and implicit functioning that is made up of a sensory processor, short-term (or working) memory, and long-term memory (Baddely, 2007).[better source needed] This can be related to the neuron
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Honor System
An honor system or honesty system is a philosophical way of running a variety of endeavors based on trust, honor, and honesty. Something that operates under the rule of the "honor system" is usually something that does not have strictly enforced rules governing its principles. In British English, it would more often be called a "trust system" and should not be confused with the British honours system. The honor system is also a system granting freedom from customary surveillance (as to students or prisoners) with the understanding that those who are so freed will be bound by their honor to observe regulations (e.g. prison farms are operated under the honor system),[1] and will therefore not abuse the trust placed in them. A person engaged in an honor system has a strong negative concept of breaking or going against it
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U.S. Games Systems, Inc.
U.S. Games Systems, Inc. (formerly U. S. Games Systems, Inc.) was founded by Stuart R. Kaplan in 1968. This U.S. company publishes a variety of books, tarot cards, oracle card decks, and playing cards. Some of their best-known products are the Rider-Waite Tarot, the multi-volume Encyclopedia of Tarot, the Wyvern collectible card game, and the Wizard card game. External links[edit]Official websiteThis tarot-related article is a stub
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Bartok (card Game)
The game of Bartok, also known by a number of other names, such as Wartoke, Warthog, Bartog, Bentok, Last One Standing or Bong 98, is a card game where the winner of each round invents a new rule which must be obeyed for the remainder of the game. It belongs to the "shedding" or Crazy Eights
Crazy Eights
family of card games, whereby each player tries to rid himself of all of his cards. The game progresses through a series of rounds with a new rule being added in each round, thus making the game increasingly complex as it progresses. These newly introduced rules may modify any existing rules.Contents1 Gameplay1.1 Creating new rules 1.2 Penalties2 Mao 3 See also 4 External linksGameplay[edit] The game of Bartok consists of several rounds of play. The winner of each round creates a new rule which remains in play for future rounds of the game. The players sit in a circle and the cards are placed face down in the center and mixed
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Wayback Machine
The Wayback Machine
Wayback Machine
is a digital archive of the World Wide Web, founded by the Internet Archive, a nonprofit organization based in San Francisco. Its founders, Brewster Khale and Bruce Gilliat developed the Wayback Machine
Wayback Machine
with the intention of providing "universal access to all knowledge" by preserving archived copies of defunct webpages. Since its launch in 2001, over 452 billion pages have been added to the archive
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Screw Your Neighbour
Ranter-Go-Round (also known as Chase the Ace, Cuckoo, Bohemian Poker, Screw Your Neighbor, Stick or Swap, Bring the King, or Chicago Shuffle)[1] is a card game with bluffing elements. It is related to the dedicated deck card or tile game Gnav. Play[edit] Any number of players, 52 cards. The object is to not have the lowest card at the table. The ranking of cards from highest to lowest is: K Q J 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 A, or alternately A K Q J 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2. Suit is irrelevant.[2] Each player has an equal number of counters placed in front of them - usually from 2 to 4 - to mark his or her "lives". (Alternatively, a dollar bill or other note may be used, and players use the corners to mark their lives, folding a corner in when a life is lost.) Cards are dealt, one card to each, face down. Starting to the left of the dealer - each in turn examines their card. If they are satisfied with their card they may keep it, usually simply by announcing, "I'm good." or similar
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Daifugō
Daifugō
Daifugō
(大富豪, Grand Millionaire) or Daihinmin (大貧民, Extreme Needy) is a Japanese card game for three or more players played with a standard 52-card pack. The objective of the game is to get rid of all the cards one has as fast as possible by playing progressively stronger cards than those of the previous player. The winner is called the daifugō (the grand millionaire) earning various advantages in the next round, and the last person is called the daihinmin (the extreme needy). In that following round, winners can exchange their one or more unnecessary cards for advantageous ones that losers have. The game is very similar to the Chinese climbing card games Big Two and Zheng Shangyou, to the Vietnamese game Tien Len, and to Western card games like President, also known as Capitalism and Asshole, and The Great Dalmuti
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Crazy Eights
Crazy Eights
Crazy Eights
is a shedding-type card game for two to seven players. The object of the game is to be the first to get rid of all the player's cards to a discard pile
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Craits
Craits
Craits
(sometimes spelled Crates or Creights) is a card game played by anywhere between two and five players. It was invented in the 1970s in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and is derived from Crazy Eights; in fact, the name Craits
Craits
is derived from Crazy Eights
Crazy Eights
itself. Craits
Craits
is similar to the marketed game Uno, which has its own specialized deck, and many cards assume the functions of Uno's specialized cards.Contents1 Rules1.1 Basic Principles 1.2 The Play 1.3 Functions of each card 1.4 The Count2 Scoring2.1 Scoring Threes 2.2 Shuffle Pressure3 Variations3.1 Variation that gives functions to face cards4 See alsoRules[edit] Basic Principles[edit] A standard deck of 52 playing cards is used; if more than five players wish to play, two decks may be used
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Schlafmütze
Schlafmütze is a fast-paced game of matching and bluffing, which is closely related to the English game spoons (or pig and tongue). The game requires a minimum of two players, but ideally a minimum of three players, and involves each player passing round cards in an attempt to acquire a hand consisting of all the same value cards (e.g. four 7s if the players each have four cards, or 3 Queens if the players each have three cards)
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Cheat (game)
Cheat (also known as B.S., bluff, and I-doubt-it[1]) is a card game where the players aim to get rid of all of their cards.[2][3] It is a game of deception, with cards being played face-down and players being permitted to lie about the cards they have played. A challenge is usually made by players calling out the name of the game, and the loser of a challenge has to pick up every card played so far. Cheat is classed as a party game.[2] As with many card games, cheat has an oral tradition and so people are taught the game under different names
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Dupa Biskupa
Dupa biskupa[1] [ˈdupa bisˈkupa] refers to several friendly card games in Poland.[2] The name is a Polish phrase meaning 'bishop's buttocks'.Contents1 General rules 2 Popular culture 3 References 4 External linksGeneral rules[edit] As dupa biskupa is a friendly game, it does not involve any exact amount of rounds and cards to use or even a set number players. There is one general rule; the more players there are, the more cards are in use.[3] The game starts with the deal assuring that each player receives the same number of cards. Starting from the first, players lay down cards in such a way that everyone can see the card. Having laid the card, the player has to do a certain act established before starting the game and attributed to the height and colour of the card or stay still without doing anything (depending on the card being played)
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