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Gmelin Database
The Gmelin database is a large database of organometallic and inorganic compounds updated quarterly. It is based on the German publication Gmelins Handbuch der anorganischen Chemie ("Gmelin's handbook of inorganic chemistry") which was originally published by Leopold Gmelin
Leopold Gmelin
in 1817;[1] the last print edition, the 8th, appeared in the 1990s. The database currently contains every compound/reaction discovered between 1772 and 1995, amounting to 1.5 million compounds and 1.3 million different reactions, with over 85,000 titles, keywords and abstracts. It has over 800 different data fields on subjects such as the compounds electric, magnetic, thermal, crystal and physiological information. The Gmelin database is maintained by Elsevier MDL
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Chemical Database
A chemical database is a database specifically designed to store chemical information. This information is about chemical and crystal structures, spectra, reactions and syntheses, and thermophysical data.Contents1 Types of chemical databases1.1 Chemical structures 1.2 Literature database 1.3 Crystallographic database 1.4 NMR spectra database 1.5 Reactions database 1.6 Thermophysical database2 Chemical structure
Chemical structure
representation 3 Search3.1 Substructure 3.2 Conformation4 Descriptors 5 Similarity 6 Registration systems 7 Tools 8 See also 9 ReferencesTypes of chemical databases[edit] Chemical structures[edit] Chemical structures are traditionally represented using lines indicating chemical bonds between atoms and drawn on paper (2D structural formulae). While these are ideal visual representations for the chemist, they are unsuitable for computational use and especially for search and storage
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Organometallic Chemistry
Organometallic chemistry
Organometallic chemistry
is the study of organometallic compounds, chemical compounds containing at least one chemical bond between a carbon atom of an organic molecule and a metal, including alkaline, alkaline earth, and transition metals, and sometimes broadened to include metalloids like boron, silicon, and tin, as well.[1] Aside from bonds to organyl fragments or molecules, bonds to 'inorganic' carbon, like carbon monoxide (metal carbonyls), cyanide, or carbide, are generally considered to be organometallic as well. Some related compounds such as transition metal hydrides and metal phosphine complexes are often included in discussions of organometallic compounds, though strictly speaking, they are not necessarily organometallic. The related but distinct term "metalorganic compound" refers to metal-containing compounds lacking direct metal-carbon bonds but which contain organic ligands
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Inorganic Chemistry
Inorganic chemistry
Inorganic chemistry
deals with the synthesis and behavior of inorganic and organometallic compounds. This field covers all chemical compounds except the myriad organic compounds (carbon based compounds, usually containing C-H bonds), which are the subjects of organic chemistry. The distinction between the two disciplines is far from absolute, as there is much overlap in the subdiscipline of organometallic chemistry
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Leopold Gmelin
Leopold Gmelin
Leopold Gmelin
(2 August 1788 – 13 April 1853) was a German chemist. Gmelin was professor at the University of Heidelberg
Heidelberg
among other things, he worked on the red prussiate and created Gmelin's test.Gmelin and his wife, portraits by Jakob Schlesinger, 1820German postal stamp featuring GmelinContents1 Life 2 Work 3 Literature 4 External linksLife[edit] Gmelin was a son of the physician, botanist and chemist Johann Friedrich Gmelin and his wife Rosine Schott. Due to his family he early came in contact with medicine and the natural sciences, in 1804 he attended the chemical lectures of his father
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Elsevier MDL
MDL Information Systems, Inc. was a provider of R&D informatics products for the life sciences and chemicals industries. The company was launched as a computer-aided drug design firm (originally named Molecular Design Limited, Inc.) in January 1978 in Hayward, California. The company was acquired by Symyx Technologies, Inc. in 2007. Subsequently Accelrys
Accelrys
merged with Symyx. The Accelrys
Accelrys
name was retained for the combined company. In 2014 Accelrys
Accelrys
was acquired by Dassault Systemes. The Accelrys
Accelrys
business unit was renamed BioVia.Contents1 History 2 Innovations 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] Molecular Design Limited, Inc. was founded by Stuart Marson and W. Todd Wipke in 1978.[1] [2] With 15 years of research on computer synthesis at the University of California, Santa Cruz, Wipke, with Marson, fresh from a Ph.D
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Reaxys
Reaxys is a web-based tool for the retrieval of chemistry information and data from published literature, including journals and patents. The information includes chemical compounds, chemical reactions, chemical properties, related bibliographic data, substance data with synthesis planning information, as well as experimental procedures from selected journals and patents. It is licensed by Elsevier.[1] Reaxys was launched in 2009 as the successor to the CrossFire databases
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Wikidata
Wikidata
Wikidata
is a collaboratively edited knowledge base hosted by the Wikimedia Foundation. It is intended to provide a common source of data which can be used by Wikimedia projects such as,[4][5] and by anyone else, under a public domain license. This is similar to the way Wikimedia Commons
Wikimedia Commons
provides storage for media files and access to those files for all Wikimedia projects, and which are also freely available for reuse. Wikidata
Wikidata
is powered by the software Wikibase.[6]Contents1 Concepts 2 Development history2.1 Phase 1 2.2 Phase 2 2.3 Phase 33 Reception 4 Logo 5 See also 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksConcepts[edit]ScreenshotsThree statements from Wikidata's item on the planet Mars
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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Gmelin Database
The Gmelin database is a large database of organometallic and inorganic compounds updated quarterly. It is based on the German publication Gmelins Handbuch der anorganischen Chemie ("Gmelin's handbook of inorganic chemistry") which was originally published by Leopold Gmelin
Leopold Gmelin
in 1817;[1] the last print edition, the 8th, appeared in the 1990s. The database currently contains every compound/reaction discovered between 1772 and 1995, amounting to 1.5 million compounds and 1.3 million different reactions, with over 85,000 titles, keywords and abstracts. It has over 800 different data fields on subjects such as the compounds electric, magnetic, thermal, crystal and physiological information. The Gmelin database is maintained by Elsevier MDL
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Beilstein Database
The Beilstein database is the largest database in the field of organic chemistry, in which compounds are uniquely identified by their Beilstein Registry Number. The database covers the scientific literature from 1771 to the present and contains experimentally validated information on millions of chemical reactions and substances from original scientific publications. The electronic database was created from Beilstein's Handbook of Organic Chemistry, founded by Friedrich Konrad Beilstein
Friedrich Konrad Beilstein
in 1881, but has appeared online under a number of different names, including Crossfire Beilstein. Since 2009, the content has been maintained and distributed by Elsevier Information Systems in Frankfurt under the product name "Reaxys".[1] The database contains information on reactions, substances, structures and properties
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