HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff

picture info

Glenn Ford
Gwyllyn Samuel Newton "Glenn" Ford (May 1, 1916 – August 30, 2006) was a Canadian-born actor who held dual Canadian and American citizenship. His career lasted more than 50 years. Although he played many different roles, Ford was best known for playing ordinary men in unusual circumstances. He was most prominent during Hollywood's Golden Age.Contents1 Early life 2 Career2.1 Early career 2.2 World War II 2.3 Acting in films 2.4 Later military service 2.5 Television 2.6 Radio3 Personal life 4 Death 5 Awards 6 Filmography6.1 Box office ranking7 Radio appearances 8 References8.1 Notes 8.2 Bibliography9 External linksEarly life[edit] Gwyllyn Samuel Newton Ford was born on May 1, 1916 in Sainte-Christine-d'Auvergne, Quebec,[1][2] the son of Hannah Wood (née Mitchell) and Newton Ford, an engineer with the Canadian Pacific Railway.[3][4] Through his father, Ford was a great-nephew of Canada's first Prime Minister, Sir John A. Macdonald,[5] and also related to U.S
[...More...]

picture info

Femme Fatale
A femme fatale (/ˌfæm fəˈtɑːl/ or /ˌfɛm fəˈtɑːl/; French: [fam fatal]), sometimes called a maneater,[1] is a stock character of a mysterious and seductive woman whose charms ensnare her lovers, often leading them into compromising, dangerous, and deadly situations. She is an archetype of literature and art. Her ability to entrance and hypnotise her victim with a spell was in the earliest stories seen as being literally supernatural; hence, the femme fatale today is still often described as having a power akin to an enchantress, seductress, vampire, witch, or demon, having power over men. In American early 20th century film, femme fatale characters were referred to as vamps, an allusion to their role as sexual vampires. The phrase is French for "fatal woman". A femme fatale tries to achieve her hidden purpose by using feminine wiles such as beauty, charm, and sexual allure. In some situations, she uses lies or coercion rather than charm
[...More...]

picture info

Guadalcanal Diary (film)
Guadalcanal
Guadalcanal
Diary is a 1943 World War II
World War II
war film directed by Lewis Seiler, featuring Preston Foster, Lloyd Nolan, William Bendix, Richard Conte, Anthony Quinn
Anthony Quinn
and the film debut of Richard Jaeckel
[...More...]

picture info

William Holden
William Holden
William Holden
(born William Franklin Beedle Jr.; April 17, 1918 – November 12, 1981) was an American actor who was one of the biggest box-office draws of the 1950s and 1960s. He won the Academy Award for Best Actor
Academy Award for Best Actor
in 1953 for his role in Stalag 17, and a Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Lead Actor for his role in the 1973 television film The Blue Knight. Holden starred in some of Hollywood's most popular and critically acclaimed films, including such classics as Sunset Boulevard, Sabrina, The Bridge on the River Kwai, The Wild Bunch, Picnic, and Network
[...More...]

picture info

Coast Guard Auxiliary
The United States
United States
Coast Guard Auxiliary (USCG Aux) is the uniformed auxiliary component of the United States
United States
Coast Guard (USCG). Congress established the USCG Aux on June 23, 1939, as the United States
United States
Coast Guard Reserve. On February 19, 1941, it was re-designated the United States Coast Guard Auxiliary. The Auxiliary exists to support all USCG missions except roles that require "direct" law enforcement or military engagement. As of 2015, there were approximately 32,000 members of the U.S
[...More...]

picture info

Edward G. Robinson
Edward G. Robinson
Edward G. Robinson
(born Emanuel Goldenberg; December 12, 1893 – January 26, 1973) was an American actor, born in Romania,[1] who was popular star on stage and screen during Hollywood's Golden Age. He appeared in 40 Broadway plays and more than 100 films during a 50-year career[2] and is best remembered for his tough-guy roles as a gangster, such as his star-making films, Little Caesar and Key Largo. During the 1930s and 1940s, he was an outspoken public critic of fascism and Nazism, which were first growing in strength in Europe and led up to World War II. His activism included contributing over $250,000 to more than 850 organizations involved in war relief, along with cultural, educational and religious groups
[...More...]

picture info

Marine Corps Reserve
The Marine Forces Reserve (MARFORRES or MFR), also known as the United States Marine Corps Reserve (USMCR) and the U.S. Marine Corps Forces Reserve, is the reserve force of the United States Marine
United States Marine
Corps. It is the largest command in the U.S. Marine Corps. Marine Forces Reserve is the headquarters command for approximately 40,000 Reserve Marines and 184 Reserve Training
Training
Centers located throughout the United States
[...More...]

picture info

United States Army Air Corps
The United States
United States
Army Air Corps (USAAC) was the aerial warfare service of the United States
United States
of America between 1926 and 1941. After World War I, as early aviation became an increasingly important part of modern warfare, a philosophical rift developed between more traditional ground-based army personnel and those who felt that aircraft were being underutilized and that air operations were being stifled for political reasons unrelated to their effectiveness. The USAAC was renamed from the earlier United States
United States
Army Air Service on 2 July 1926, and was part of the larger United States
United States
Army. The Air Corps became the United States
United States
Army Air Forces (USAAF) on 20 June 1941, giving it greater autonomy from the Army's middle-level command structure
[...More...]

picture info

Tyrone Power
Tyrone Edmund Power III[1][2] (May 5, 1914 – November 15, 1958) was an American film, stage and radio actor. From the 1930s to the 1950s Power appeared in dozens of films, often in swashbuckler roles or romantic leads. His better-known films include The Mark of Zorro, Blood and Sand, The Black Swan, Prince of Foxes, Witness For The Prosecution, The Black Rose, and Captain from Castile. Power's own favorite film among those that he starred in was Nightmare Alley.[3] Though largely a matinee idol in the 1930s and early 1940s and known for his striking looks, Power starred in films in a number of genres, from drama to light comedy. In the 1950s he began placing limits on the number of films he would make in order to devote more time for theater productions. He received his biggest accolades as a stage actor in John Brown's Body and Mister Roberts
[...More...]

picture info

Marksmanship Badge (United States)
In the United States (U.S.), a marksmanship badge is a U.S. military badge or a civilian badge which is presented to personnel upon successful completion of a weapons qualification course (known as marksmanship qualification badges) or high achievement in an official marksmanship competition (known as marksmanship competition badges). Today, the U.S. Army
U.S. Army
and the U.S. Marine Corps
U.S. Marine Corps
are the only military services that issue marksmanship qualification badges. However, marksmanship medals and/or marksmanship ribbons are issued by the U.S. Navy, U.S. Coast Guard, and U.S. Air Force
U.S. Air Force
for weapons qualifications. For non-military personnel, different U.S. law enforcement organizations and the National Rifle Association
National Rifle Association
(NRA) issue marksmanship qualification badges to those involved in law enforcement
[...More...]

picture info

Quantico, Virginia
Quantico (formerly Potomac)[3] is a town in Prince William County, Virginia, United States. The population was 480 at the 2010 census. Quantico is bordered by the U.S. military installation of Marine Corps Base Quantico on three sides and the Potomac River
Potomac River
on the fourth. Quantico is located south of the mouth of Quantico Creek
Quantico Creek
on the Potomac. The word Quantico is a derivation of the name of a Doeg village recorded by English colonists as Pamacocack.[citation needed] Quantico is the site of one of the largest U.S. Marine Corps
U.S. Marine Corps
bases, MCB Quantico. The base is the site of the Marine Corps Combat Development Command and HMX-1
HMX-1
(the presidential helicopter squadron), Officer Candidate School, and The Basic School
[...More...]

picture info

Fredric March
Fredric March
Fredric March
(born Ernest Frederick McIntyre Bickel; August 31, 1897 – April 14, 1975) was a "distinguished stage actor and one of Hollywood's most celebrated, versatile stars of the 1930s and 40s."[1][2] He won the Academy Award for Best Actor
Academy Award for Best Actor
for Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1931) and The Best Years of Our Lives
The Best Years of Our Lives
(1946), as well as the Tony Award for Best Actor in a Play for Years Ago (1947) and Long Day's Journey into Night (1956). March is the only actor to have won both the Academy Award
Academy Award
and the Tony Award twice.Contents1 Early life 2 Career 3 Personal life 4 Tributes 5 Filmography and awards 6 Radio appearances 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksEarly life[edit] March was born in Racine, Wisconsin, the son of Cora Brown Marcher (1863–1936), a schoolteacher, and John F
[...More...]

picture info

Duodenal Ulcer
Peptic ulcer
Peptic ulcer
disease (PUD) is a break in the lining of the stomach, first part of the small intestine or occasionally the lower esophagus.[1][7] An ulcer in the stomach is known as a gastric ulcer while that in the first part of the intestines is known as a duodenal ulcer.[1] The most common symptoms of a duodenal ulcer are waking at night with upper abdominal pain or upper abdominal pain that improves with eating.[1] With a gastric ulcer the pain may worsen with eating.[8] The pain is often described as a burning or dull ache.[1] Other symptoms include belching, vomiting, weight loss, or poor appetite.[1] About a th
[...More...]

picture info

American Campaign Medal
The American Campaign Medal
American Campaign Medal
is a military award of the United States Armed Forces which was first created on November 6, 1942 by Executive Order 9265 issued by President Franklin D. Roosevelt.[1][2] The medal was intended to recognize those military members who had performed military service in the American Theater of Operations during World War II.[2] A similar medal, known as the American Defense Service Medal was awarded for active duty service prior to the United States entry into World War II.Contents1 History 2 Criteria 3 Appearance 4 Ribbon devices 5 Campaigns5.1 Navy campaigns 5.2 Army campaigns6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksHistory[edit] The American Campaign Medal
American Campaign Medal
was established per Executive Order 9265,6 November 1942, by President Franklin D. Roosevelt
Franklin D. Roosevelt
and announced in War Department Bulletin 56, 1942
[...More...]

picture info

Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal
The Asiatic–Pacific Campaign Medal[1] is a United States
United States
military award of the Second World War, which was awarded to any member of the United States
United States
Armed Forces who served in the Asiatic-Pacific Theater from 1941 to 1945. The medal was created on November 6, 1942 by Executive Order 9265[2] issued by President Franklin D. Roosevelt
[...More...]

picture info

World War II Victory Medal
The World War II Victory Medal is a service medal of the United States military which was established by an Act of Congress on 6 July 1945 (Public Law 135, 79th Congress) and promulgated by Section V, War Department Bulletin 12, 1945.[1][2] The corresponding medal from World War I
World War I
is the World War I
World War I
Victory Medal.Contents1 History 2 Criteria 3 Appearance 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] The World War II Victory Medal was first issued as a service ribbon referred to as the “Victory Ribbon.” The World War II Victory Medal was established by an Act of Congress on 6 July 1945 (Public Law 135, 79th Congress) and promulgated by Section V, War Department Bulletin 12, 1945. The medal was designed by Mr. Thomas H. Jones and approved by the Secretary of War on 5 February 1946
[...More...]