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Gilbert Model
The Gilbert model was developed by Dennis Gilbert as a means of a more effective way of classifying people in a given society into social classes.Contents1 Influences 2 Basis 3 Six social classes3.1 Capitalist class 3.2 Upper middle class 3.3 Lower middle class 3.4 Working class 3.5 Working-poor class 3.6 Underclass4 See also 5 References 6 Further readingInfluences[edit] Karl Marx
Karl Marx
believed
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Gilbert–Elliot Model
In telecommunication, a burst error or error burst is a contiguous sequence of symbols, received over a communication channel, such that the first and last symbols are in error and there exists no contiguous subsequence of m correctly received symbols within the error burst.[1] The integer parameter m is referred to as the guard band of the error burst. The last symbol in a burst and the first symbol in the following burst are accordingly separated by m correct bits or more. The parameter m should be specified when describing an error burst. Channel model[edit] The Gilbert–Elliott model is a simple channel model introduced by Edgar Gilbert[2] and E. O. Elliott [3] widely used for describing burst error patterns in transmission channels, that enables simulations of the digital error performance of communications links. It is based on a Markov chain with two states G (for good or gap) and B (for bad or burst)
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Social Classes
A social class is a set of subjectively defined concepts in the social sciences and political theory centered on models of social stratification in which people are grouped into a set of hierarchical social categories,[1] the most common being the upper, middle and lower classes. "Class" is a subject of analysis for sociologists, political scientists, anthropologists and social historians. However, there is not a consensus on a definition of "class" and the term has a wide range of sometimes conflicting meanings
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Social Hierarchy
Social stratification
Social stratification
is a kind of social differentiation whereby a society groups people into socioeconomic strata, based upon their occupation and income, wealth and social status, or derived power (social and political). As such, stratification is the relative social position of persons within a social group, category, geographic region, or social unit. In modern Western societies, social stratification typically is distinguished as three social classes: (i) the upper class, (ii) the middle class, and (iii) the lower class; in turn, each class can be subdivided into strata, e.g
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Discrimination
In human social affairs, discrimination is treatment or consideration of, or making a distinction in favor of or against, a person based on the group, class, or category to which the person is perceived to belong rather than on individual attributes
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Minority Group
A minority group refers to a category of people differentiated from the social majority, those who hold on to major of positions of social power in a society. It may be defined by law. The differentiation can be based on one or more observable human characteristics, including: ethnicity, race, religion, disability, gender, wealth, health or sexual orientation. Usage of the term is applied to various situations and civilizations within history despite its popular misassociation with a numerical, statistical minority.[1] In the social sciences, the term "minority" is sometimes used to describe social power relations between dominant and subordinate groups, rather than simply indicating demographic variation within a population.[2] Furthermore, from an intersectional sociological perspective, any given individual may simultaneously occupy both a majority identity and a minority identity, depending on the intersection of different social categories (e.g
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Employability
Employability can be defined as “doing value creating work, getting paid for it and learning at the same time, enhancing the ability to get work in the future”[1]Contents1 Extended Definition 2 Employability relationship2.1 Traditional employment without employability 2.2 Employment including employability contract 2.3 Employability in relation to freelance or ad hoc work 2.4 Pro-active development of employability 2.5 Organization
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Social Security
Social security
Social security
is "any government system that provides monetary assistance to people with an inadequate or no income."[1] Social security
Social security
is enshrined in Article 22 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, which states:Everyone, as a
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Working Poor
The working poor are working people whose incomes fall below a given poverty line. This is due to a lack of work hours and/or low wages. The reason they are earning such low wages is because the working poor face numerous obstacles that make it difficult for many of them to find and keep a job. They also find it difficult to save up money, and maintain a sense of self-worth.[1] The official working poverty rate in the US has remained relatively static over the past four decades. Many social scientists argue that the official rate is set too low, and that the proportion of workers facing significant financial hardship has instead increased over the years. Changes in the economy, especially the shift from a manufacturing-based to a service-based economy, have resulted in the polarization of the labor market
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Working Class
The working class (also labouring class and proletariat) are the people employed for wages, especially in manual-labour occupations and industrial work.[1] Working-class occupations include blue-collar jobs, some white-collar jobs, and most pink-collar jobs
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American Dream
The American Dream
American Dream
is a national ethos of the United States, the set of ideals (democracy, rights, liberty, opportunity and equality) in which freedom includes the opportunity for prosperity and success, as well as an upward social mobility for the family and children, achieved through hard work in a society with few barriers
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Upper Middle Class
In sociology, the upper middle class is the social group constituted by higher status members of the middle class. This is in contrast to the term lower middle class, which is used for the group at the opposite end of the middle-class stratum, and to the broader term middle class. There is considerable debate as to how the upper middle class might be defined
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Residential Segregation
Residential segregation in the United States
Residential segregation in the United States
is the physical separation of two or more groups into different neighborhoods,[1] or a form of segregation that "sorts population groups into various neighborhood contexts and shapes the living environment at the neighborhood level".[2] While it has traditionally been associated with racial segregation, it generally refers to any kind of sorting based on some criteria populations (e.g. race, ethnicity, income).[3] While overt segregation is illegal in the United States, housing patterns show significant and persistent segregation for certain races and income groups. The history of American social and public policies, like Jim Crow laws
Jim Crow laws
and Federal Housing Administration's early redlining policies, set the tone for segregation in housing
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Labor Force
The workforce or labour force (labor force in American English; see spelling differences) is the labour pool in employment. It is generally used to describe those working for a single company or industry, but can also apply to a geographic region like a city, state, or country. Within a company, its value can be labelled as its " Workforce
Workforce
in Place". The workforce of a country includes both the employed and the unemployed. The labour force participation rate, LFPR (or economic activity rate, EAR), is the ratio between the labour force and the overall size of their cohort (national population of the same age range). The term generally excludes the employers or management, and can imply those involved in manual labour
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