HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1500] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Gibson Les Paul Studio
The GIBSON LES PAUL STUDIO is a solid body electric guitar produced by the Gibson Guitar Corporation since 1983. It is similar to the traditional Gibson Les Paul Standard, but without upscale cosmetic features such as binding. 2001 Gibson Les Paul Head Detail CONTENTS * 1 History * 2 Models and variations * 2.1 Studio Standard * 2.2 Studio Custom * 2.3 Vintage Mahogany/Studio Faded * 2.4 Studio Lite * 2.5 Gem Series * 2.6 SmartWood series * 2.6.1 SmartWood Exotic * 2.6.2 Studio SmartWood * 2.6.3 Studio Swamp Ash * 2.7 Gothic * 2.8 Voodoo * 2.9 Pro Plus * 2.10 Premium Plus * 2.11 Robot Limited * 3 References HISTORYResponding to a gap in their model lineup for a lower-priced Les Paul in 1983, Gibson introduced the Studio model. The Studio was designed to attract guitar players who desired traditional Les Paul sound without having to pay for cosmetic features of upscale models. In order to produce a lower-cost Les Paul, features such as body binding, neck binding, and headstock inlays were not available. Additionally, the body was ⅛ inch thinner than a standard Les Paul. Initially made of alder from 1983-1985, Gibson moved back to maple top/mahogany body combination after the alder body proved prone to lacquer problems
[...More...]

"Gibson Les Paul Studio" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Gibson Guitar Corporation
Coordinates : 36°07′48″N 86°43′33″W / 36.1298758°N 86.7257458°W / 36.1298758; -86.7257458 GIBSON BRANDS, INC. (formerly GIBSON GUITAR CORP.) is an American manufacturer of guitars , other musical instruments, and consumer and professional electronics now based in Nashville, Tennessee . The company was formerly known as Gibson Guitar Corp. and renamed Gibson Brands, Inc. on June 11, 2013. Orville Gibson founded the company in 1902 as "The Gibson Mandolin- Guitar Mfg. Co., Ltd." in Kalamazoo, Michigan to make mandolin -family instruments. Gibson invented archtop guitars by constructing the same type of carved, arched tops used on violins. By the 1930s, the company was also making flattop acoustic guitars, as well as one of the first commercially available hollow-body electric guitars, used and popularized by Charlie Christian . In 1944, Gibson was bought by Chicago Musical Instruments (CMI) which was acquired in 1969 by Panama-based conglomerate, Ecuadorian Company Limited (E.C.L.) that changed its name in the same year to Norlin Corporation. Gibson sells guitars under a variety of brand names and builds one of the world's most iconic guitars, the Gibson Les Paul . Many Gibson instruments are highly collectible
[...More...]

"Gibson Guitar Corporation" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Set-in Neck
SET-IN NECK is a method of guitar (or similar stringed instrument) construction that involves joining neck and body with a tightly fitted mortise-and-tenon or dovetail joint, secured with some sort of adhesive . It is a common belief that this yields a stronger body-to-neck connection than a bolt-on neck , though some luthiers believe a well-executed bolt-on neck joint is equally strong and provides similar neck-to-body contact. However, neither of these joints is as strong as a neck-through body construction, which requires more material and is usually only on high-end solid body guitars. Set-in necks are the most popular on acoustic guitars . Almost all major acoustic guitar manufacturers use set-in necks, with notable exceptions being Taylor Guitars
Taylor Guitars
and Collings Guitars . In the electric guitar market, Gibson produces almost all of its electric offerings as set-in neck models—as opposed to Fender , which builds most of its electric instruments with bolt-on necks. In rare cases, maker use other solutions. Babicz Guitars makes a mechanically joined neck that can be "wound" up or down to adjust action height
[...More...]

"Set-in Neck" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Mahogany
MAHOGANY is a kind of wood —the straight-grained , reddish-brown timber of three tropical hardwood species of the genus _ Swietenia
Swietenia
_, indigenous to the Americas
Americas
, part of the pantropical chinaberry family , Meliaceae. The three species are: * Honduran or big-leaf mahogany (_ Swietenia
Swietenia
macrophylla _), with a range from Mexico to southern Amazonia in Brazil
Brazil
, the most widespread species of mahogany and the only true mahogany species commercially grown today. Illegal logging of _S. macrophylla_, and its highly destructive environmental effects, led to the species' placement in 2003 on Appendix II of Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species
Species
(CITES), the first time that a high-volume, high-value tree was listed on Appendix II. * West Indian or Cuban mahogany (_ Swietenia
Swietenia
mahagoni _), native to southern Florida and the Caribbean
Caribbean
, formerly dominant in the mahogany trade, but not in widespread commercial use since World War II. * _ Swietenia
Swietenia
humilis _, a small and often twisted mahogany tree limited to seasonally dry forests in Pacific Central America that is of limited commercial utility. Some botanists believe that _S. humilis_ is a mere variant of _S. macrophylla_
[...More...]

"Mahogany" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Maple
See either species grouped by sections alphabetical list of species Distribution_ACER_ /ˈeɪsər/ is a genus of trees or shrubs commonly known as MAPLE. The genus is placed in the Sapindaceae family. There are approximately 128 species , most of which are native to Asia, with a number also appearing in Europe, northern Africa, and North America. Only one species, _ Acer laurinum _, extends to the Southern Hemisphere. The type species of the genus is the sycamore maple, _ Acer pseudoplatanus _, the most common maple species in Europe. CONTENTS * 1 Morphology * 2 Pests and diseases * 3 Cultural significance * 4 Uses * 4.1 Horticulture * 4.1.1 Cultivars * 4.1.2 Bonsai * 4.1.3 Collections * 4.2 Tourism * 4.3 Commercial uses * 4.3.1 Maple syrup * 4.3.2 Timber * 4.3.3 Tonewood * 4.3.4 Agriculture * 4.3.5 Pulpwood * 4.4 Gallery * 5 See also * 6 References * 6.1 Bibliography * 7 External links MORPHOLOGY _ Acer saccharum _ (Sugar maple) Most maples are trees growing to a height of 10–45 m (33–148 ft). Others are shrubs less than 10 meters tall with a number of small trunks originating at ground level. Most species are deciduous , and many are renowned for their autumn leaf colour , but a few in southern Asia and the Mediterranean region are evergreen
[...More...]

"Maple" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Fraxinus Pennsylvanica
FRAXINUS PENNSYLVANICA (GREEN ASH or RED ASH) is a species of ash native to eastern and central North America
North America
, from Nova Scotia
Nova Scotia
west to southeastern Alberta
Alberta
and eastern Colorado
Colorado
, south to northern Florida , and southwest to Oklahoma
Oklahoma
and eastern Texas
Texas
. It has spread and become naturalized in much of the western United States
United States
and also in Europe from Spain
Spain
to Russia
Russia
. Other names more rarely used include downy ash, swamp ash and water ash. CONTENTS * 1 Description * 2 Ecology * 3 Uses * 3.1 Urban ornamental trees * 3.2 Other uses * 4 References DESCRIPTION Bark
Bark
Fraxinus pennsylvanica is a medium-sized deciduous tree reaching 12–25 m (39–82 ft) (rarely to 45 m or 148 ft) tall with a trunk up to 60 cm (24 in) in diameter. The bark is smooth and gray on young trees, becoming thick and fissured with age. The winter buds are reddish-brown, with a velvety texture
[...More...]

"Fraxinus Pennsylvanica" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Rosewood
ROSEWOOD refers to any of a number of richly hued timbers , often brownish with darker veining but found in many different hues. CONTENTS * 1 True rosewoods * 2 Other * 3 Uses * 4 Genuine rosewood product characteristics * 5 See also * 6 References TRUE ROSEWOODS _ Chess pieces in Dalbergia latifolia _ rosewood All genuine rosewoods belong to the genus _ Dalbergia _. The preeminent rosewood appreciated in the Western world is the wood of _ Dalbergia nigra _ which is now a CITES -listed endangered species on Appendix 1, which means no commercial sales for wood that is cut after 1992. It is best known as Brazilian Rosewood, but also as Bahia rosewood. This wood has a strong sweet smell, which persists for many years, explaining the name rosewood. Another classic rosewood comes from _ Dalbergia latifolia _ known as (East) Indian rosewood or sonokeling (Indonesia). It is native to India and is also grown in plantations elsewhere in Pakistan(chiniot) . Madagascar rosewood (_ Dalbergia maritima _), known as _bois de rose_, is highly prized for its red color. It is overexploited in the wild, despite a 2010 moratorium on trade and illegal logging , which continue on a large scale. Throughout southeast Asia _ Dalbergia oliveri _ is harvested for use in woodworking. It has a very fragrant and dense grain near the core, however the outer sapwood is soft and porous
[...More...]

"Rosewood" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ebony
EBONY is a dense black hardwood , most commonly yielded by several different species in the genus Diospyros
Diospyros
, which also contains the persimmons . Ebony
Ebony
is dense enough to sink in water. It is finely-textured and has a very smooth finish when polished, making it valuable as an ornamental wood. The word ebony comes from the Ancient Egyptian hbny, through the Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek
ἔβενος (ébenos), into Latin
Latin
and Middle English . CONTENTS * 1 Species * 2 Uses * 3 Legislation * 4 Gallery * 5 See also * 6 References * 7 External links SPECIESSpecies of ebony include Diospyros
Diospyros
ebenum (Ceylon ebony), native to southern India
India
and Sri Lanka
Sri Lanka
; Diospyros
Diospyros
crassiflora (Gabon ebony), native to western Africa
Africa
; and Diospyros
Diospyros
celebica (Makassar ebony), native to Indonesia and prized for its luxuriant, multi-colored wood grain. Mauritius ebony, Diospyros
Diospyros
tesselaria, was largely exploited by the Dutch in the 17th century. Some species in the genus Diospyros yield an ebony with similar physical properties, but striped rather than evenly black ( Diospyros
Diospyros
ebenum)
[...More...]

"Ebony" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Tune-o-matic
TUNE-O-MATIC (also abbreviated to TOM) is the name of a fixed or floating bridge design for electric guitars . It was designed by Ted McCarty ( Gibson Guitar Corporation president) and introduced on the Gibson Super 400 guitar in 1953 and the Les Paul Custom the following year. In 1955, it was used on the Gibson Les Paul Gold Top. It was gradually accepted as a standard on almost all Gibson electric guitars, replacing the previous wrap-around bridge design, except on the budget series. CONTENTS * 1 Function * 2 Construction * 3 Varieties * 4 Adjust-o-Matic * 5 Saddle groove maintenance * 6 Spelling * 7 References FUNCTIONGuitar strings , especially steel strings, are not ideal vibrators. Generally the thicker the string, the shorter the effective length. This refers to the length of string involved in producing a sound, as opposed to the length between the nut and the bridge. Many guitar designs with fixed bridges have the bridge slanted or stepped so that the distance from nut to bridge is larger for thick strings. The Tune-o-matic
Tune-o-matic
extends this idea to make the distance adjustable for all the strings, within limits. A common way of determining correct adjustment for a string is to compare the pitch at the 12th fret with the harmonic at the same position. The two should be as close as possible
[...More...]

"Tune-o-matic" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Humbucker
A HUMBUCKING PICKUP, HUMBUCKER, or DOUBLE COIL, is a type of electric guitar pickup that uses two coils to "buck the hum" (or cancel out the interference) picked up by coil pickups. Most pickups use magnets to produce a magnetic field around the strings, and induce an electrical current in the coils as the strings vibrate (a notable exception is the piezoelectric pickup ). Humbuckers work by pairing a coil with the north poles of its magnets oriented "up", (toward the strings) with a coil which has the south pole of its magnets oriented up. By connecting the coils together out of phase , the interference is significantly reduced via phase cancellation . The string signals from both coils add up instead of canceling, because the magnets are placed in opposite polarity. The coils can be connected in series or in parallel in order to achieve this hum-cancellation effect, although it's much more common for the coils of a single pickup to be connected in series. In addition to electric guitar pickups, humbucking coils are sometimes used to cancel hum in dynamic microphones. Hum is caused by the alternating magnetic fields created by transformers and power supplies inside electrical equipment using alternating current. While playing a guitar without humbuckers, a musician would hear a hum through the pickups during quiet sections of music. Sources of studio and stage hum include high-power amps, processors, mixers, motors, power lines, and other equipment
[...More...]

"Humbucker" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

P-90
The P-90
P-90
is a single coil electric guitar pickup produced by Gibson since 1946. Gibson is still producing P-90s, and there are outside companies that manufacture replacement versions. CONTENTS * 1 History * 2 Varieties * 3 Sound * 4 Hum-canceling and humbucker-shaped versions * 5 References * 6 External links HISTORYAround 1940 Gibson offered a new bridge pickup for ES-100/125 series, as an alternative to the classic Charlie Christian
Charlie Christian
, cased in metal. Officially P-90
P-90
pickups were introduced in 1946, when Gibson resumed guitar production after World War II
World War II
. They were initially used to replace Gibson's original "bar" or "blade" pickup (also known by many as the " Charlie Christian
Charlie Christian
pickup ") on models such as the ES-150 , and by the end of the 1940s it was the standard pickup on all models. The P-90's reign as the Gibson standard pickup was short-lived, as a new design of pickup, the humbucker , was introduced in 1957. Equipped with double coils , the new pickup boasted greater output and less hum , although with less high end response
[...More...]

"P-90" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Solid Body
A SOLID-BODY musical instrument is a string instrument such as a guitar , bass or violin built without its normal sound box and relying on an electric pickup system to directly receive the vibrations of the strings. Solid-body instruments are preferred in situations where acoustic feedback may otherwise be a problem and are inherently both less expensive to build and more rugged than acoustic electric instruments. Fender Esquire 1st prototype in 1949 at Fender Guitar
Guitar
Factory museum The most well-known solid body instruments are the electric guitar and electric bass . These were instrumental in creating new genres of music such as rock and heavy metal . Common woods used in the construction of solid body instruments are ash, alder, maple, mahogany, korina, spruce, rosewood, and ebony. The first two make up the majority of solid body electric guitars. Solid body
Solid body
instruments have some of the same features as acoustic string instruments. Like a typical string instrument they have a neck with tuners for the strings, a bridge and a fingerboard (or fretboard). The fretboard is a piece of wood placed on the top surface of the neck, extending from the head to the body. The strings run above the fingerboard. Some fingerboards have frets or bars which the strings are pressed against. This allows musicians to stop the string in the same place
[...More...]

"Solid Body" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Electric Guitar
An ELECTRIC GUITAR is a fretted stringed instrument with a neck and body that uses a pickup to convert the vibration of its strings into electrical signals. The vibration occurs when a guitarist strums , plucks or fingerpicks the strings. It is sensed by a pickup , most commonly by a magnetic pickup that uses the principle of direct electromagnetic induction . The signal generated by an electric guitar is too weak to drive a loudspeaker , so it is plugged into a guitar amplifier before being sent to a loudspeaker, which makes a sound loud enough to hear. The output of an electric guitar is an electric signal, and the signal can easily be altered by electronic circuits to add "color" to the sound or change the sound. Often the signal is modified using effects such as reverb and distortion and "overdrive" , with the growling sound of the latter being a key element of the sound of the electric guitar as it is used in blues and rock music . Invented in 1931, the amplified electric guitar was adopted by jazz guitarists , who sought to be able to do single-note guitar solos in large big band ensembles. Early proponents of the electric guitar on record included Les Paul , Lonnie Johnson , Sister Rosetta Tharpe , T-Bone Walker , and Charlie Christian
[...More...]

"Electric Guitar" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Inlays
INLAY covers a range of techniques in sculpture and the decorative for inserting pieces of contrasting, often coloured materials into depressions in a base object to form ornament or pictures that normally are flush with the matrix. A great range of materials have been used both for the base or matrix and for the inlays inserted into it. CONTENTS* 1 In wood * 1.1 Uses * 2 Metal * 3 Stone * 4 Kinds of inlay * 5 See also * 6 Notes * 7 External links IN WOOD Inlay
Inlay
(ivory , red sandalwood, copper) on side of eastern wooden casket Baroque altar frontal in pietra dura In a wood matrix, inlays commonly use wood veneers , but other materials like shells , mother-of-pearl , horn or ivory may also be used. Pietre dure , or coloured stones inlaid in white or black marbles, and inlays of precious metals in a base metal matrix are other forms of inlay. Master craftsmen who make custom knives continue a tradition of ancient techniques of inlaying precious metals; additionally, many new techniques which use contemporary tools have also been developed and utilized as well by artisans
[...More...]

"Inlays" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Superstrat
SUPERSTRAT is a name for an electric guitar design that resembles a Fender Stratocaster
Fender Stratocaster
but with differences that clearly distinguish it from a standard Stratocaster, usually to cater to a different playing style. Differences typically (but not necessarily) include more pointed, aggressive-looking body and neck shapes, different woods, increased number of frets, usage of humbucking pickups and locking tremolo systems, most commonly the Floyd Rose
Floyd Rose
. There is no formal definition of a superstrat; the categorisation is still largely left to popular opinion and depends greatly on the artist(s) associated with a particular model and how it is marketed. Superstrats are generally suited for heavy metal music played with high-gain distortion . CONTENTS* 1 History * 1.1 Genesis, custom modifications * 1.2 Mass production
Mass production
* 1.3 Fender\'s response * 1.4 Gibson\'s response * 1.5 End of superstrat era * 2 References HISTORYGENESIS, CUSTOM MODIFICATIONS Eddie Van Halen's Frankenstrat , red painted version With the increased popularity in heavy metal music during the early 1980s, guitarists began seeking out guitars more suited to the new style, both in terms of looks (more "pointy" aggressive designs) and playability (ease of playing and larger tone that sounds pleasant with hi-gain amplification)
[...More...]

"Superstrat" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Amethyst
AMETHYST is a violet variety of quartz often used in jewelry . The name comes from the Koine Greek
Koine Greek
ἀμέθυστος amethystos from ἀ- a-, "not" and μεθύσκω methysko / μεθύω methyo, "intoxicate", a reference to the belief that the stone protected its owner from drunkenness . The ancient Greeks wore amethyst and carved drinking vessels from it in the belief that it would prevent intoxication. It is one of several forms of quartz . Amethyst
Amethyst
is a semiprecious stone and is the traditional birthstone for February. CONTENTS * 1 Structure * 2 Hue and tone * 3 History * 4 Synthetic amethyst * 5 Cultural history * 5.1 Ancient Greece
Ancient Greece
* 5.2 Other cultural associations * 6 Geographic distribution * 7 Value * 8 See also * 9 References STRUCTURE Amethyst
Amethyst
is a purple variety of quartz (SiO2) and owes its violet color to irradiation , iron impurities (in some cases in conjunction with transition element impurities), and the presence of trace elements, which result in complex crystal lattice substitutions. The hardness of the mineral is the same as quartz, thus it is suitable for use in jewelry. HUE AND TONE Amethyst
Amethyst
occurs in primary hues from a light pinkish violet to a deep purple
[...More...]

"Amethyst" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo