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Ghazi Of Iraq
Ghazi bin Faisal (Arabic: غازي ابن فيصل‎ Ġāzī bin Fayṣal) (2 May 1912 – 4 April 1939) was the King of the Hashemite Kingdom of Iraq
Kingdom of Iraq
from 1933 to 1939 having been briefly Crown Prince
Crown Prince
of the Kingdom of Syria
Kingdom of Syria
in 1920. He was born in Mecca, the only son of Faisal I,[3] the first King of Iraq.Contents1 Early life 2 Flying carpet 3 Simele
Simele
Massacre 4 King of Iraq 5 Death 6 Marriage and children 7 Ancestry 8 See also 9 References 10 External linksEarly life[edit] Ghazi was the only son of Faisal (later to become King Faisal I of Iraq) and Huzaima bint Nasser. In his childhood Ghazi was left with his grandfather, Hussein bin Ali, the Hashemite
Hashemite
Grand Sharif of Mecca and head of the royal house of Hashim, while his father was occupied with travel and in military campaigns against the Ottomans
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Fatimah
Ibrahim (brother)[7]  Part of a series on Shia
Shia
IslamBeliefs and practicesMonotheism Holy Books Prophethood Succession to Muhammad Imamate Angels Judgment Day Mourning of Muharram Intercession Clergy The Four Companions Arba'een
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Ma'ruf Al-Rusafi
Ma'ruf bin Abdul Ghani al Rusafi (1875–1945) (Arabic: معروف الرصافي) was a poet, educationist and literary scholar from Iraq.[1][2] He is considered by many as a controversial figure in modern Iraqi literature[3] due to his advocacy of freedom and opposition to imperialism[4] and is known as a poet of freedom.[5]Contents1 Birth and early life in Baghdad 2 Life in Turkey and Syria 3 Brief stay in Jerusalem 4 Return to Iraq 5 Political and social activism 6 Literary works6.1 Publications 6.2 Manuscripts7 See also 8 References 9 Further reading 10 External linksBirth and early life in Baghdad[edit] Maruf al Rusafi is known to have born in 1875[4] (his birth date has also been reported as 1 January 1877[6]) at Al Rusafa in Baghdad in Iraq[7] in a family of meagre financial means.[8] His father, Abdul Gani, hailing from the Jibara tribe of Kurdish area,[6] died while he was a child and was brought up by his mother, Fathima[8] who was of Turki
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Harrow School
Harrow
Harrow
School /ˈhæroʊ/[2] is an independent boarding school for boys in Harrow, London, England.[3] The School was founded in 1572 by John Lyon under a Royal Charter
Royal Charter
of Elizabeth I, and is one of the original seven public schools that were regulated by the Public Schools Act 1868. Harrow
Harrow
charges up to £12,850 per term, with three terms per academic year (2017/18).[4] Harrow
Harrow
is the fourth most expensive boarding school in the Headmasters' and Headmistresses' Conference.[5] The school has an enrolment of 821 boys[6] all of whom board full-time, in twelve boarding houses.[7] It remains one of four all-boys, full-boarding schools in Britain, the others being Eton College, Radley College
Radley College
and Winchester College.[citation needed] Harrow's uniform includes straw hats, morning suits, top hats and canes
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Charles Lindbergh
Charles Augustus Lindbergh (February 4, 1902 – August 26, 1974), nicknamed Lucky Lindy, The Lone Eagle, and Slim[1] was an American aviator, military officer, author, inventor, explorer, and environmental activist. At age 25 in 1927, he went from obscurity as a U.S. Air Mail
U.S. Air Mail
pilot to instantaneous world fame by winning the Orteig Prize: making a nonstop flight from Roosevelt Field, Long Island, New York, to Paris, France. He covered the ​33 1⁄2-hour, 3,600 statute miles (5,800 km) alone in a single-engine purpose-built Ryan monoplane, Spirit of St. Louis. This was the first solo transatlantic flight and the first non-stop flight between North America and mainland Europe. Lindbergh was an officer in the U.S
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Ancient Babylon
Babylon (𒆍𒀭𒊏𒆠KAN4.DIĜIR.RAKI Akkadian: Bābili(m); Aramaic: בבל, Babel; Arabic: بَابِل‎, Bābil; Hebrew: בָּבֶל‎, Bavel; Classical Syriac: ܒܒܠ‎, Bāwēl) was a key kingdom in ancient Mesopotamia from the 18th to 6th centuries BC. The city was built on the Euphrates river and divided in equal parts along its left and right banks, with steep embankments to contain the river's seasonal floods. Babylon was originally a small Akkadian town dating from the period of the Akkadian Empire c. 2300 BC. The town became part of a small independent city-state with the rise of the First Amorite Babylonian Dynasty in the nineteenth century BC. After the Amorite king Hammurabi created a short-lived empire in the 18th century BC, he built Babylon up into a major city and declared himself its king, and southern Mesopotamia became known as Babylonia and Babylon eclipsed Nippur as its holy city
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Simele
Simele
Simele
(Syriac: Šhem'ēl‎ ܫܡܐܝܠ, Kurdish: سێمێل,Sêmêl, Arabic: سميل‎) is a town located in the Dohuk
Dohuk
province of Iraqi Kurdistan. The city is on the main road that connects Iraq
Iraq
to its neighbour Turkey. It is 14 km west of the city of Dohuk
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Simele Massacre
Early Assyrian Period
Early Assyrian Period
(2600 BCE – 2025 BCE) Old Assyrian Empire
Old Assyrian Empire
(2025 BC - 1378 BCE)
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Pan-Arab
Pan-Arabism
Pan-Arabism
or Arabism is an ideology espousing the unification of the countries of North Africa and West Asia from the Atlantic Ocean
Atlantic Ocean
to the Arabian Sea, referred to as the Arab world. It is closely connected to Arab nationalism, which asserts that the Arabs
Arabs
constitute a single nation
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Nazi Germany
Coordinates: 52°31′N 13°24′E / 52.517°N 13.400°E / 52.517; 13.400 "Drittes Reich" redirects here
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Kuwait
Coordinates: 29°30′N 45°45′E / 29.500°N 45.750°E / 29.500; 45.750State of Kuwait دولة الكويت (Arabic) Dawlat al-KuwaitFlagEmblemAnthem: "Al-Nasheed Al-Watani" "National Anthem"Location of  Kuwait  (green)Capital and largest city Kuwait
Kuwait
City 29°22′N 47°58′E / 29.367°N 47.967°E / 29.367; 47.967Official languages ArabicEthnic groups60%
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Regent
A regent (from the Latin
Latin
regens,[1] "[one] ruling"[2]) is "a person appointed to administer a state because the monarch is a minor, is absent or is incapacitated."[3] The rule of a regent or regents is called a regency. A regent or regency council may be formed ad hoc or in accordance with a constitutional rule. "Regent" is sometimes a formal title. If the regent is holding his position due to his position in the line of succession, the compound term prince regent is often used; if the regent of a minor is his mother, she is often referred to as "queen regent". If the formally appointed regent is unavailable or cannot serve on a temporary basis, a Regent
Regent
ad interim may be appointed to fill the gap. In a monarchy, a regent usually governs due to one of these reasons, but may also be elected to rule during the interregnum when the royal line has died out
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Grand Sharif Of Mecca
The Sharif of Mecca
Mecca
(Arabic: شريف مكة‎, Sharīf Makkah) or Hejaz
Hejaz
(Arabic: شريف الحجاز‎, Sharīf al-Ḥijāz) was the title of the leader of the Sharifate of Mecca, traditional steward of the holy cities of Mecca
Mecca
and Medina
Medina
and the surrounding Hejaz. The term sharif means "noble" in Arabic and is used to describe the descendants of Prophet Muhammad's grandson al-Hassan ibn Ali. The Sharif was charged with protecting the cities and their environs and ensuring the safety of pilgrims performing the Hajj. The title is sometimes spelled Sheriff or Sherif, with the latter variant used, for example, by T. E. Lawrence
T. E. Lawrence
in Seven Pillars of Wisdom. The office of the Sharifate of Mecca
Sharifate of Mecca
dates back to the late Abbasid era
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Hashim Ibn Abd Manaf
Hashim
Hashim
(Arabic: هاشم‎) is a common male Arabic given name, which signifies "Destroyer of Evil” The title Hashim
Hashim
was given to 'Amr al-ʻUlā ibn 'Abd Manaf, as he was generous in providing bread to poor people and travelers going to Mecca
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Abu Talib Ibn Abd Al-Muttalib
Abū Ṭālib ibn ‘Abd al-Muṭṭalib (Arabic: ابو طالب بن عبد المطلب‎;[a] c. 539 – c. 619), was the leader of Banu Hashim, a clan of the Qurayshi tribe of Mecca
Mecca
in the Hijaz, Arabian Peninsula. After the death of his father Abd al-Muttalib, he inherited this position and the offices of Siqaya and Rifada.[2] He was well respected in Mecca
Mecca
despite a declining fortune.[3] Abu Talib was an uncle of the Islamic Nabī (Arabic: نَـبِي‎, Prophet) Muhammad, and father of the Rashid Caliph Ali, who is also regarded as the first Shi'ite Imam. There is a great debate among Muslim scholars on whether he died a Muslim or a non-Muslim.Contents1 Early life 2 Relationship with Muhammad2.1 Protecting Muhammad3 Death 4 Views4.1 Sunni 4.2 Shi'ite5 Family 6 See also 7 Notes 8 ReferencesEarly life[edit]This section needs expansion. You can help by adding to it
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