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Gertrude Robinson Smith
Gertrude Robinson Smith
Gertrude Robinson Smith
(July 13, 1881 – October 22, 1963) was an arts patron, philanthropist and a founder of the Berkshire Symphonic Festival, which came to be known as Tanglewood. At the height of the Great Depression, Smith gathered the human resources and secured the financial backing that supported the festival’s early success. Her leadership from the first concerts in August 1934 through the mid-1950s has been recognized as foundational to assuring the success of one of the world’s most celebrated seasonal music festivals.Contents1 Early life 2 Life in the Berkshires 3 First concert season 4 Tanglewood 5 Legacy 6 References 7 External linksEarly life[edit] Gertrude Robinson Smith
Gertrude Robinson Smith
was the daughter of Charles Robinson Smith and Jeannie Porter Steele
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New York City
Bronx, Kings (Brooklyn), New York (Manhattan), Queens, Richmond (Staten Island)Historic colonies New Netherland Province of New YorkSettled 1624Consolidated 1898Named for James, Duke of YorkGovernment[2] • Type Mayor–Council • Body New York City
New York City
Council • Mayor Bill de Blasio
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Alfred Gwynne Vanderbilt
Alfred Gwynne Vanderbilt, Sr. (October 20, 1877 – May 7, 1915) was an extremely wealthy American businessman and sportsman, and a member of the famous Vanderbilt family. He died on the RMS Lusitania.[1]Contents1 Life 2 Career2.1 RMS Lusitania3 Personal life3.1 Hobbies 3.2 Memorials4 Bibliography 5 External linksLife[edit]Vanderbilt caricatured by Spy for Vanity Fair, 1907Alfred was born in New York City, the third son of Cornelius Vanderbilt II (1843–1899) and Alice Claypoole Gwynne
Alice Claypoole Gwynne
(1845–1934). He attended the St. Paul's School in Concord, New Hampshire
Concord, New Hampshire
and Yale University (Class of 1899),[2] where he was a member of Skull and Bones.[3] Soon after graduation, Vanderbilt, with a party of friends, started on a tour of the world which was to have lasted two years
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Boston University Tanglewood Institute
Boston University
Boston University
Tanglewood Institute (BUTI) is a summer music training program for students ages 10 to 20 located in Lenox, Massachusetts, under the auspices of Boston University
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Salzburg Festival
The Salzburg
Salzburg
Festival
Festival
(German: Salzburger Festspiele) is a prominent festival of music and drama established in 1920. It is held each summer (for five weeks starting in late July) within the Austrian town of Salzburg, the birthplace of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
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Eliel Saarinen
Helsinki
Helsinki
Central railway station National Museum of Finland Vyborg
Vyborg
railway station Hvitträsk Kleinhans Music HallProjects Finnish pavilion at the World Fair
World Fair
of 1900Design Finnish markka
Finnish markka
banknotes introduced in 1922Gottlieb Eliel Saarinen
Eliel Saarinen
(Finnish pronunciation: [ˈeliel ˈsɑːrinen]; August 20, 1873 – July 1, 1950) was a Finnish architect known for his work with art nouveau buildings in the early years of the 20th century. He was the father of Eero Saarinen.Contents1 Life and work in Finland 2 Move to the United States 3 Significant works 4 References 5 Further reading 6 External linksLife and work in Finland[edit] Saarinen was educated in Helsinki
Helsinki
at the Helsinki
Helsinki
University of Technology
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Ride Of The Valkyries
The "Ride of the Valkyries" (German: Walkürenritt or Ritt der Walküren) refers to the beginning of act 3 of Die Walküre, the second of the four operas constituting Richard Wagner's Der Ring des Nibelungen.Performed in 1921by the American Symphony Orchestra for Edison RecordsMore recent performanceby the University of Chicago
University of Chicago
OrchestraProblems playing these files? See media help.As a separate piece, the "Ride" is often heard in a purely instrumental version, which may be as short as three minutes
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Richard Wagner
Wilhelm Richard Wagner
Richard Wagner
(/ˈvɑːɡnər/; German: [ˈʁiçaʁt ˈvaːɡnɐ] ( listen); 22 May 1813 – 13 February 1883) was a German composer, theatre director, polemicist, and conductor who is chiefly known for his operas (or, as some of his later works were later known, "music dramas"). Unlike most opera composers, Wagner wrote both the libretto and the music for each of his stage works. Initially establishing his reputation as a composer of works in the romantic vein of Carl Maria von Weber
Carl Maria von Weber
and Giacomo Meyerbeer, Wagner revolutionised opera through his concept of the Gesamtkunstwerk
Gesamtkunstwerk
("total work of art"), by which he sought to synthesise the poetic, visual, musical and dramatic arts, with music subsidiary to drama. He described this vision in a series of essays published between 1849 and 1852
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Nathaniel Hawthorne
Nathaniel Hawthorne
Nathaniel Hawthorne
(/ˈhɔːθɔːrn/; né Hathorne; July 4, 1804 – May 19, 1864) was an American novelist, dark romantic, and short story writer. He was born in 1804 in Salem, Massachusetts
Salem, Massachusetts
to Nathaniel Hathorne and the former Elizabeth Clarke Manning. His ancestors include John Hathorne, the only judge involved in the Salem witch trials
Salem witch trials
who never repented of his actions. He entered Bowdoin College
Bowdoin College
in 1821, was elected to Phi Beta Kappa
Phi Beta Kappa
in 1824,[1] and graduated in 1825. He published his first work in 1828, the novel Fanshawe; he later tried to suppress it, feeling that it was not equal to the standard of his later work.[2] He published several short stories in periodicals, which he collected in 1837 as Twice-Told Tales. The next year, he became engaged to Sophia Peabody
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Tanglewood Tales
Tanglewood
Tanglewood
Tales for Boys and Girls (1853) is a book by American author Nathaniel Hawthorne, a sequel to A Wonder-Book for Girls and Boys. It is a re-writing of well-known Greek myths in a volume for children. Overview[edit] The book includes the myths of:Theseus and the Minotaur (Chapter : "The Minotaur") Antaeus
Antaeus
and the Pygmies (Chapter: "The Pygmies") Dragon's Teeth (Chapter: "The Dragon's Teeth") Circe's Palace (Chapter: "Circe's Palace") Proserpina, Ceres, Pluto, and the Pomegranate
Pomegranate
Seed (Chapter: "The Pomegranate
Pomegranate
Seed") Jason
Jason
and the Golden Fleece
Golden Fleece
(Chapter: "The Golden Fleece")Hawthorne wrote introduction, titled "The Wayside", referring to The Wayside in Concord, where he lived from 1852 until his death
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Boston Symphony Orchestra
The Boston
Boston
Symphony Orchestra
Orchestra
(BSO) is an American orchestra based in Boston, Massachusetts. It is one of the five major American symphony orchestras commonly referred to as the "Big Five".[1] Founded in 1881, the BSO plays most of its concerts at Boston's Symphony Hall and in the summer performs at Tanglewood. Andris Nelsons
Andris Nelsons
is the current music director of the BSO
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Lenox, Massachusetts
Lenox is a town in Berkshire County, Massachusetts, United States. Set in Western Massachusetts, it is part of the Pittsfield Metropolitan Statistical Area. The population was 5,025 at the 2010 census.[1] Lenox is the site of Tanglewood, summer home of the Boston
Boston
Symphony Orchestra. Lenox includes the villages of New Lenox and Lenoxdale, and is a tourist destination during the summer.Contents1 History 2 Geography 3 Demographics 4 Government 5 Education 6 Sites of interest 7 Notable residents 8 See also 9 References 10 External linksHistory[edit]View of Lenox in 1839The area was inhabited by Mahicans, Algonquian speakers who largely lived along the Hudson and Housatonic Rivers.[2] Hostilities during the French and Indian Wars
French and Indian Wars
discouraged settlement by European colonial settlers until 1750, when Jonathan and Sarah Hinsdale from Hartford, Connecticut, established a small inn and general store
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Mark Hanna
Marcus Alonzo Hanna (September 24, 1837 – February 15, 1904) was an American businessman and Republican politician, who served as a United States Senator from Ohio
Ohio
as well as chairman of the Republican National Committee. A friend and political ally of President William McKinley, Hanna used his wealth and business skills to successfully manage McKinley's presidential campaigns in 1896 and 1900. Hanna was born in New Lisbon (today Lisbon), Ohio, in 1837. His family moved to the growing city of Cleveland
Cleveland
in his teenage years, where he attended high school with John D. Rockefeller. He was expelled from college, and entered the family mercantile business
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Old Curtisville Historic District
Old Curtisville Historic District
Old Curtisville Historic District
encompasses village center of Interlaken in Stockbridge, Massachusetts. It is historically significant as the site of the first wood-based newsprint paper mill in the United States, and has a well-preserved collection of late 18th and early 19th-century architecture. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1976.[1]Contents1 Description and history 2 Gallery 3 See also 4 ReferencesDescription and history[edit] The area now known as Interlaken,[2] is located in northern Stockbridge, between Stockbridge Bowl
Stockbridge Bowl
(originally Lake Mahkeenac) and Lake Averic (also known as Echo Lake), which is the town of Stockbridge's water supply. Massachusetts Route 183
Massachusetts Route 183
transects the community north to south. The road roughly parallels Larrywaug Brook, the outflow of Stockbridge Bowl
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New York Philharmonic Orchestra
The New York Philharmonic, officially the Philharmonic-Symphony Society of New York, Inc.,[1] globally known as New York Philharmonic Orchestra
Orchestra
(NYPO)[2][3][4][5] or New York Philharmonic-Symphony Orchestra,[6][7] is a symphony orchestra based in New York City
New York City
in the United States. It is one of the leading American orchestras popularly referred to as the "Big Five".[8] The Philharmonic's home is David Geffen Hall, located in New York's Lincoln Center
Lincoln Center
for the Performing Arts.[9] Founded in 1842, the orchestra is one of the oldest musical institutions in the United States and the oldest of the "Big Five" orchestras
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