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German Army (Wehrmacht)
6,550,000 (peak in 1943)Active: 4,250,000 Reserve: 2,300,00014,800,000 (total who served)[1]Part of Oberkommando des HeeresMotto(s) "Gott mit uns"Engagements Spanish Civil War World War IICommandersCommander-in-chief of the Army Adolf HitlerChief of the Armed Forces Wilhelm KeitelOther Commanders of the Army Ferdinand Schörner (30 April 1945 to 8 May 1945) Walther von Brauchitsch (4 February 1938 to 19 December 1941) Werner von Fritsch (Inception to 4 February 1938)InsigniaRanks and insignia Ranks and insignia of the Army Infantry
Infantry
unit flagThe
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German Rearmament
The German rearmament (Aufrüstung, German pronunciation: [ˈaʊ̯fˌʀʏstʊŋ]) was an era of rearmament in Germany during the interwar period (1918–1939), in violation of the Treaty of Versailles. It began as soon as the treaty was signed, on a small, secret, and informal basis,[1] but it was massively expanded after the Nazi Party came to power in 1933. Despite its scale, the Aufrüstung was for years a largely covert operation, carried out mostly in a secretive manner through organizations (some of which were racketeer-style fronts), until the reality of the German rearmament was exposed by Carl von Ossietzky in 1931
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World War I
Allied victoryCentral Powers' victory on the Eastern Front nullified by defeat on the Western Front Fall of the German, Russian, Ottoman, and Austro-Hungarian empires Russian Civil War
Russian Civil War
and foundation of the Soviet Union Formation of new countries in Europe
Europe
and the Middle East Transfer of German colonies
German colonies
and regions of the former Ottoman Empire to other powers Establishment of the League of Nations
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Austrian Army
The Austrian Armed Forces
Austrian Armed Forces
(German: Österreichisches Bundesheer, lit.: Austrian Federal Army) is the military of the Republic of Austria. It is divided into branches: the Joint Forces (Streitkräfteführungskommando; SKFüKdo), which consist of Land Forces (Landstreitkräfte), Air Forces (Luftstreitkräfte), International Missions (Internationale Einsätze) and Special
Special
Forces (Spezialeinsatzkräfte), next to Mission Support (Kommando Einsatzunterstützung; KdoEU) and Joint Command Support Centre (Führungsunterstützungszentrum; FüUZ).[2] Austria, a landlocked country, has no navy; from 1958 to 2006 however the Austrian army operated a naval squadron of patrol boats on the River Danube
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Corps
Corps
Corps
(/kɔːr/; plural corps /kɔːrz/; via French, from the Latin corpus "body") is a term used for several different kinds of organization. Within military terminology a corps may be:an operational formation, sometimes known as a field corps, which consists of two or more divisions, such as the Corps
Corps
d'armée, later known as I Corps
Corps
("First Corps") of Napoleon's Grande Armée); an administrative corps (or mustering) – that is a specialized branch of a military service (such as an artillery corps, a medical corps, or a force of military police) or; in some cases, a distinct service within a national military (such as the United States Marine Corps).These usages often overlap
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Combined Arms
Combined arms
Combined arms
is an approach to warfare which seeks to integrate different combat arms of a military to achieve mutually complementary effects (for example, using infantry and armor in an urban environment, where one supports the other, or both support each other).[1] According to strategist William S. Lind, combined arms can be distinguished from the concept of "supporting arms" as follows: Combined arms
Combined arms
hits the enemy with two or more arms simultaneously in such a manner that the actions he must take to defend himself from one make him more vulnerable to another
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Encirclement
Encirclement
Encirclement
is a military term for the situation when a force or target is isolated and surrounded by enemy forces.[1] This situation is highly dangerous for the encircled force: at the strategic level, because it cannot receive supplies or reinforcements, and on the tactical level, because the units in the force can be subject to an attack from several sides. Lastly, since the force cannot retreat, unless it is relieved or can break out, it must either fight to the death or surrender. A special kind of encirclement is the siege. In this case, the encircled forces are enveloped in a fortified position in which long-lasting supplies and strong defences are in place, allowing them to withstand attacks. Sieges have taken place in almost all eras of warfare
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Conscription
Military
Military
service National service Conscription
Conscription
crisis Conscientious objector Alternative civilian service Conscription
Conscription
by countryv t eConscription, sometimes called the draft, is the compulsory enlistment of people in a national service, most often a military service.[5] Conscription
Conscription
dates back to antiquity and continues in some countries to the present day under various names. The modern system of near-universal national conscription for young men dates to the French Revolution in the 1790s, where it became the basis of a very large and powerful military
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Battle Of Annihilation
A battle of annihilation is a military strategy in which an attacking army seeks to destroy the military capacity of the opposing army in a single planned pivotal battle
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Infantry
Infantry
Infantry
is the branch of an army that engages in military combat on foot, distinguished from cavalry, artillery, and tank forces. Also known as foot soldiers, infantry traditionally relies on moving by foot between combats as well, but may also use mounts, military vehicles, or other transport
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Demobilization
Demobilization
Demobilization
or demobilisation (see spelling differences) is the process of standing down a nation's armed forces from combat-ready status. This may be as a result of victory in war, or because a crisis has been peacefully resolved and military force will not be necessary. The opposite of demobilization is mobilization. Forceful demobilization of a defeated enemy is called demilitarization. In the final days of World War
War
II, for example, the United States Armed Forces developed a demobilization plan which would discharge soldiers on the basis of a point system that favoured length and certain types of service
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German Language
No official regulation ( German orthography
German orthography
regulated by the Council for German Orthography[4]). Language
Language
codesISO 639-1 deISO 639-2 ger (B) deu (T)ISO 639-3 Variously: deu – German gmh&#
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Artillery
Artillery
Artillery
is a class of large military weapons built to fire munitions far beyond the range and power of infantry's small arms. Early artillery development focused on the ability to breach fortifications, and led to heavy, fairly immobile siege engines. As technology improved, lighter, more mobile field artillery developed for battlefield use. This development continues today; modern self-propelled artillery vehicles are highly mobile weapons of great versatility providing the largest share of an army's total firepower. In its earliest sense, the word artillery referred to any group of soldiers primarily armed with some form of manufactured weapon or armour. Since the introduction of gunpowder and cannon, the word "artillery" has largely meant cannon, and in contemporary usage, it usually refers to shell-firing guns, howitzers, mortars, rockets and guided missiles
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Motorized Infantry
In NATO
NATO
and most other western countries, motorized infantry is infantry that is transported by trucks or other un-protected motor vehicles. It is distinguished from mechanized infantry, which is carried in armoured personnel carriers or infantry fighting vehicles, and from light infantry, which can typically operate autonomously from supporting elements and vehicles for relatively long periods and may be airborne. In Russia
Russia
and the former Soviet Union, the term motostrelki (мотострелки in Cyrillic) is used to indicate mechanized infantry; that usage, during the Korean War, prevailed in all Warsaw Pact countries. Motorizing infantry is the first stage towards the mechanization of an army. Civilian trucks are readily adaptable to military uses of transporting soldiers, towing guns, and carrying equipment and supplies
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Norwegian Campaign
German victoryOccupation of Norway
Norway
by Nazi Germany Evacuation of the Norwegian government and royal family Establishment of the Norwegian Armed Forces
Norwegian Armed Forces
in exile Reichskommissariat NorwegenBelligerents Germany  Norway  United Kingdom  France Polish Armed Forces in the WestCommanders and leaders Nikolaus von Falkenhorst Kristian Laake (9–10 April) Otto Ruge (from 10 April) Lord CorkStrengthc. 100,000 7 divisions 1 Fallschirmjäger
Fallschirmjäger
battalion Total: c. 93,000 Norway: 6 divisions (c. 55,000 combatants involved in the fighting) Allies: c. 38,000Casualties and lossesOfficial German figures: 5,296 (1,317 killed on land, 2,375 lost at sea, 1,604 wounded) Material losses: 1 heavy cruiser 2 light cruisers 10 destroyers 6 U-boats 2 torpedo boats 15 light naval units 21 transports/merchant ships 90–240 aircraft Total: c
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Anschluss
Anschluss
Anschluss
(German: [ˈʔanʃlʊs] ( listen) 'joining') refers to the annexation of Austria
Austria
into
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