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Geothermal Desalination
Geothermal desalination
Geothermal desalination
is a process under development for the production of fresh water using heat energy. Claimed benefits of this method of desalination are that it requires less maintenance than reverse osmosis membranes and that the primary energy input is from geothermal heat, which is a low-environmental-impact source of energy. Circa 1995, Douglas Firestone from Nevada
Nevada
devised the use of geothermal water directly as a source for desalination. In 1998, several individuals began working with evaporation/condensation air loop water desalination. The experiment was successful and a proof of concept, proving that geothermal waters could be used as process water to produce potable water in 2001. In 2005 to 2009 testing was done in a sixth prototype of a device referred to as a delta t device, a closed air loop, atmospheric pressure, evaporation condensation loop geothermally powered desalination device
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Proof Of Concept
Proof of concept (PoC) is a realization of a certain method or idea in order to demonstrate its feasibility,[1] or a demonstration in principle with the aim of verifying that some concept or theory has practical potential.[citation needed] A proof of concept is usually small and may or may not be complete.Contents1 Usage history 2 Examples2.1 Filmmaking 2.2 Engineering 2.3 Business development 2.4 Security 2.5 Software development 2.6 Drug development3 See also 4 ReferencesUsage history[edit] The appearance of the term in news archives suggests it might have been in common use as early as 1967.[2] In 1969 Committee on Science and Astronautics
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Geothermal Power In El Salvador
Geothermal power in El Salvador represents 25% of the country's total electricity production.[1][2] El Salvador is one of the top ten geothermal energy producers in the world. Since 1975, the Ahuachapán geothermal field has been in continuous and successful commercial operation. Since 1992, the Berlin geothermal field is under commercial production, with the installation of two units. Each one with 5 MWe power plants. See also[edit]El Salvador portal Energy portalElectricity sector in El Salvador Renewable energy by countryReferences[edit]^ "Generacion Electricidad El Salvador", IGA, retrieved 2011-08-30  ^ "CENTROAMÉRICA: MERCADOS MAYORISTAS DE ELECTRICIDAD Y TRANSACCIONES EN EL MERCADO ELÉCTRICO REGIONAL, 2010" (PDF), CEPAL, retrieved 2011-08-30 This article about energy, its collection, its distribution, or its uses is a stub. You can help by expanding it.v t eThis El Salvador–related article is a stub
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Salt
Table salt or common salt is a mineral composed primarily of sodium chloride (NaCl), a chemical compound belonging to the larger class of salts; salt in its natural form as a crystalline mineral is known as rock salt or halite. Salt
Salt
is present in vast quantities in seawater, where it is the main mineral constituent. The open ocean has about 35 grams (1.2 oz) of solids per litre, a salinity of 3.5%. Salt
Salt
is essential for life in general, and saltiness is one of the basic human tastes. Salt
Salt
is one of the oldest and most ubiquitous food seasonings, and salting is an important method of food preservation. Some of the earliest evidence of salt processing dates to around 8,000 years ago, when people living in the area of present-day Romania boiled spring water to extract salts; a salt-works in China dates to approximately the same period
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Scripps Institution Of Oceanography
The Scripps Institution of Oceanography
Oceanography
(sometimes referred to as SIO, Scripps Oceanography, or Scripps) in La Jolla, California, founded in 1903, is one of the oldest and largest centers for ocean and Earth science research, public service, undergraduate and graduate training in the world. Hundreds of ocean and Earth
Earth
scientists conduct research with the aid of oceanographic research vessels and shorebased laboratories. Its Old Scripps Building
Old Scripps Building
is a U.S. National Historic Landmark. SIO is a division of the University of California
California
San Diego (UCSD). The public explorations center of the institution is the Birch Aquarium at Scripps
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Nevada
Nevada
Nevada
(/nɪˈvædə/; see pronunciations) is a state in the Western, Mountain West, and Southwestern regions of the United States
United States
of America. It borders Oregon
Oregon
to the northwest, Idaho
Idaho
to the northeast, California
California
to the west, Arizona
Arizona
to the southeast and Utah
Utah
to the east. Nevada
Nevada
is the 7th most extensive, the 34th most populous, but the 9th least densely populated of the 50 United States
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Energy
In physics, energy is the quantitative property that must be transferred to an object in order to perform work on, or to heat, the object.[note 1] Energy
Energy
is a conserved quantity; the law of conservation of energy states that energy can be converted in form, but not created or destroyed. The SI unit of energy is the joule, which is the energy transferred to an object by the work of moving it a distance of 1 metre against a force of 1 newton. Common forms of energy include the kinetic energy of a moving object, the potential energy stored by an object's position in a force field (gravitational, electric or magnetic), the elastic energy stored by stretching solid objects, the chemical energy released when a fuel burns, the radiant energy carried by light, and the thermal energy due to an object's temperature. Mass
Mass
and energy are closely related
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Jermaghbyur Geothermal Power Plant
The Jermaghbyur Geothermal Power Plant will be Armenia's largest geothermal power plant having an installed electric capacity of 150 MW. It will be situated in Syunik Province of Armenia.[1][2] See also[edit]Armenia portal Geology portal Renewable energy portalKarkar Geothermal Power PlantReferences[edit]^ New Geothermal Plant for Armenia ^ http://www.thinkgeoenergy.com/armenia-to-start-geothermal-exploration-at-syunik/This article about a power station is a stub
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Fresh Water
Fresh water
Fresh water
(or freshwater) is naturally occurring water on Earth's surface in ice sheets, ice caps, glaciers, icebergs, bogs, ponds, lakes, rivers and streams, and underground as groundwater. Fresh water is generally characterized by having low concentrations of dissolved salts and other total dissolved solids. The term specifically excludes seawater and brackish water although it does include mineral-rich waters such as chalybeate springs. Fresh water
Fresh water
is not the same as potable water (or drinking water): Much of the earth's surface fresh water and groundwater is unsuitable for drinking without some form of treatment
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Water Recycling
Reclaimed or recycled water (also called wastewater reuse or water reclamation) is the process of converting wastewater into water that can be reused for other purposes. Reuse
Reuse
may include irrigation of gardens and agricultural fields or replenishing surface water and groundwater (i.e., groundwater recharge). Reused water may also be directed toward fulfilling certain needs in residences (e.g. toilet flushing), businesses, and industry, and could even be treated to reach drinking water standards. This last option is called either "direct potable reuse" or "indirect potable" reuse, depending on the approach used. Colloquially, the term "toilet to tap" also refers to potable reuse. Reclaiming water for reuse applications instead of using freshwater supplies can be a water-saving measure
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Methane Hydrate
Methane
Methane
clathrate (CH4·5.75H2O) or (4CH4·23H2O), also called methane hydrate, hydromethane, methane ice, fire ice, natural gas hydrate, or gas hydrate, is a solid clathrate compound (more specifically, a clathrate hydrate) in which a large amount of methane is trapped within a crystal structure of water, forming a solid similar to ice.[1] Originally thought to occur only in the outer regions of the Solar System, where temperatures are low and water ice is common, significant deposits of methane clathrate have been found under sediments on the ocean floors of the Earth.[2] Methane
Methane
clathrates are common constituents of the shallow marine geosphere and they occur in deep sedimentary structures and form outcrops on the ocean floor
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Osmoregulation
Osmoregulation
Osmoregulation
is the active regulation of the osmotic pressure of an organism's body fluids, detected by osmoreceptors, to maintain the homeostasis of the organism's water content; that is, it maintains the fluid balance and the concentration of electrolytes (salts in solution) to keep the fluids from becoming too diluted or concentrated. Osmotic pressure
Osmotic pressure
is a measure of the tendency of water to move into one solution from another by osmosis
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Parts Per Million
In science and engineering, the parts-per notation is a set of pseudo-units to describe small values of miscellaneous dimensionless quantities, e.g. mole fraction or mass fraction. Since these fractions are quantity-per-quantity measures, they are pure numbers with no associated units of measurement. Commonly used are ppm (parts-per-million, 10−6), ppb (parts-per-billion, 10−9), ppt (parts-per-trillion, 10−12) and ppq (parts-per-quadrillion, 10−15). This notation is not part of the SI system and its meaning is ambiguous.Contents1 Overview1.1 In nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy2 Parts-per expressions 3 Criticism3.1 Long and short scales 3.2 Thousand
Thousand
vs. trillion 3.3 Mass fraction vs. mole fraction vs
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Geothermal Power In Ethiopia
Energy in Ethiopia is energy and electricity production, consumption, transport, exportation and importation in Ethiopia.Contents1 Overview 2 Primary energy sector2.1 Primary energy use 2.2 Energy reserves2.2.1 Solid and liquid fuels 2.2.2 Natural gas2.3 Transport of primary energy sources2.3.1 Road transport 2.3.2 Pipelines3 Secondary energy sector3.1 Overview 3.2 Refined oil products 3.3 Bioethanol 3.4 Electricity3.4.1 Electricity production potential 3.4.2 Electricity generation3.4.2.1 Hydropower 3.4.2.2 Wind power 3.4.2.3 Solar Energy 3.4.2.4 Geothermal energy 3.4.2.5 Co-generation 3.4.2.6 Other thermal power stations3.5 Transport of energy carriers3.5.1 Power transmission lines and electrification 3.5.2 Roads and rail 3.5.3 Pipelines4 See also 5 References 6 External linksOverview[edit] See also: Deforestation in Ethiopia and List of power stations in Ethiopia The following table prov
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Energy In Mexico
Mexico total primary energy consumption by fuel in 2015[1]   Coal (7%)   Natural Gas (41%)   Hydro (4%)   Nuclear (1%)   Oil (45%)   Others (Renew.) (2%)Energy in Mexico describes energy and electricity production, consumption and import in Mexico. Electricity sector in Mexico is the main article of electricity in Mexico. In 2008, Mexico produced 234 TWh, from which 86 TWh are coming from thermal plant, 39 TWh from hydro-power, 18 TWh from coal, 9,8 TWh from nuclear power, 7 TWh from geothermal power and 0,255 TWh from wind power.[2] Mexico is among the top oil producers and exporters in the world.Contents1 Overview 2 Oil production 3 Renewable energy3.1 Geothermal power 3.2 Wind power4 See also 5 References 6 External linksOverview[edit]Energy in Mexico[3]Capita Prim
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Klaipėda Geothermal Demonstration Plant
The Klaipėda Geothermal Demonstration Plant is a geothermal heating plant in Klaipėda, Lithuania, constructed during the late 1990s and early 2000s. It was the first geothermal heating plant in the Baltic Sea region.[1] Its purpose was to reduce carbon dioxide, sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxide, and particulate emissions in the area, as well as to reduce Lithuania's dependence on foreign energy sources. The plant supplies district heating to the city. Construction was financed by a loan from the World Bank (US$5.9 million) and a grant from the Global Environment Facility (US$6.9 million). The Danish state company Dansk Olie og Naturgas (now DONG Energy) provided technical support, and Enterprise Geoterma (EG) served as the implementing agency
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