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Georges Méliès
Marie-Georges-Jean Méliès, known as Georges Méliès (/meɪˈljɛs/;[1] French: [meljɛs]; 8 December 1861 – 21 January 1938), was a French illusionist and film director who led many technical and narrative developments in the earliest days of cinema. Méliès was an especially prolific innovator in the use of special effects, popularizing such techniques as substitution splices, multiple exposures, time-lapse photography, dissolves, and hand-painted color
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Film Projector
A movie projector is an opto-mechanical device for displaying motion picture film by projecting it onto a screen
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Painting
Painting
Painting
is the practice of applying paint, pigment, color or other medium[1] to a solid surface (support base). The medium is commonly applied to the base with a brush, but other implements, such as knives, sponges, and airbrushes, can be used. Painting
Painting
is a mode of creative expression, and can be done in numerous forms. Drawing, gesture (as in gestural painting), composition, narration (as in narrative art), or abstraction (as in abstract art), among other aesthetic modes, may serve to manifest the expressive and conceptual intention of the practitioner.[2] Paintings can be naturalistic and representational (as in a still life or landscape painting), photographic, abstract, narrative, symbolistic (as in Symbolist art), emotive (as in Expressionism), or political in nature (as in Artivism). A portion of the history of painting in both Eastern and Western art is dominated by spiritual motifs and ideas
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Franco-Prussian War
Baden  Bavaria Württemberg Hesse-Darmstadt French Empirea German Empired French RepublicbCommanders and leaders William I Otto von Bismarck Helmuth von Moltke Crown Prince Friedrich Prince Friedrich Karl Karl F. von Steinmetz Albrecht von Roon Napoleon
Napoleon
III (POW) F. A
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Memoir
A memoir (US: /ˈmemwɑːr/;[1] from French: mémoire: memoria, meaning memory or reminiscence) is a collection of memories that an individual writes about moments or events, both public or private, that took place in the subject's life.[2][3] The assertions made in the work are understood to be factual. While memoir has historically been defined as a subcategory of biography or autobiography since the late 20th century, the genre is differentiated in form, presenting a narrowed focus. A biography or autobiography tells the story "of a life", while a memoir often tells a story "from a life", such as touchstone events and turning points from the author's life
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Puppet
A puppet is an object, often resembling a human, animal or mythical figure, that is animated or manipulated by a person called a puppeteer. The puppeteer uses movements of their hands, arms, or control devices such as rods or strings to move the body, head, limbs, and in some cases the mouth and eyes of the puppet. The puppeteer often speaks in the voice of the character of the puppet, and then synchronizes the movements of the puppet's mouth with this spoken part. The actions, gestures and spoken parts acted out by the puppeteer with the puppet are typically used in storytelling. Puppetry is a very ancient form of theatre which dates back to the 5th century BC in Ancient Greece. There are many different varieties of puppets, and they are made from a wide range of materials, depending on their form and intended use
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Marionettes
A marionette is a puppet controlled from above using wires or strings depending on regional variations. A marionette's puppeteer is called a marionettist.[1] Marionettes are operated with the puppeteer hidden or revealed to an audience by using a vertical or horizontal control bar in different forms of theatres or entertainment venues. They have also been used in films and on television
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Baccalauréat
The baccalauréat (French pronunciation: ​[bakaloʁea]), often known in France
France
colloquially as bac, is an academic qualification which French students take after high school. It was introduced by Napoleon I
Napoleon I
in 1808. It is the main diploma required to pursue university studies. There is also the European Baccalaureate which students take at the end of the European School
European School
education. It confirms a rounded secondary education and gives access to a wide range of university education. It differs from British A levels
A levels
and Scottish Highers, but is similar to a North American two-years College diploma, in that it is earned comprehensively and can be obtained in streams requiring a high level in a number of different subjects, depending on the stream
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London, England
London
London
(/ˈlʌndən/ ( listen)) is the capital and most populous city of England
England
and the United Kingdom.[7][8] Standing on the River Thames
River Thames
in the south east of the island of Great Britain, London has been a major settlement for two millennia. It was founded by the Romans, who named it Londinium.[9] London's ancient core, the City of London, largely retains its 1.12-square-mile (2.9 km2) medieval boundaries
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Egyptian Hall
Coordinates: 51°30′29″N 0°8′21″W / 51.50806°N 0.13917°W / 51.50806; -0.13917The facade of the Egyptian Hall
Egyptian Hall
in 1815The Great Room of the Egyptian Hall
Egyptian Hall
as redesigned by J. B. Papworth, 1819The Egyptian Hall
Egyptian Hall
in Piccadilly, London, was an exhibition hall built in the ancient Egyptian style in 1812, to the designs of Peter Frederick Robinson. The Hall was a considerable success, with exhibitions of artwork and of Napoleonic era
Napoleonic era
relics
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John Nevil Maskelyne
John Nevil Maskelyne
Nevil Maskelyne
(22 December 1839 – 18 May 1917) was an English stage magician and inventor of the pay toilet, along with many other Victorian-era devices. Working with magicians George Alfred Cooke and David Devant, many of his illusions are still performed today. His book Sharps and Flats: A Complete Revelation of the Secrets of Cheating at Games of Chance and Skill is considered a classic overview of card sharp practices, and in 1914 he founded the Occult Committee, a group whose remit was to "investigate claims to supernatural power and to expose fraud".Contents1 Biography1.1 Beginnings 1.2 Becoming professional 1.3 Further achievements 1.4 Skepticism 1.5 Inventions2 Family 3 Publications 4 References 5 External linksBiography[edit] Maskelyne was born in Cheltenham, Gloucestershire, England
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Stage Magic
Magic, along with its subgenres of, and sometimes referred to as illusion, stage magic or street magic is a performing art in which audiences are entertained by staged tricks or illusions of seemingly impossible feats using natural means.[1][2] It is to be distinguished from paranormal magic which, it is claimed, are effects created through supernatural means. It is one of the oldest performing arts in the world.Contents1 History1.1 Magic tricks 1.2 Modern stage magic2 Categories of effects 3 Learning magic 4 Types of magic performance 5 Misuse of magic 6 Researching magic 7 See also 8 References 9 Further reading 10 External linksHistory[edit] The term "magic" etymologically derives from the Greek word mageia (μαγεία). In ancient times, Greeks and Persians had been at war for centuries, and the Persian priests, called magosh in Persian, came to be known as magoi in Greek
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École Des Beaux-Arts
An École des Beaux-Arts
École des Beaux-Arts
(French pronunciation: ​[ekɔl de bozaʁ], School of Fine Arts) is one of a number of influential art schools in France. The most famous is the École nationale supérieure des Beaux-Arts, now located on the left bank in Paris, across the Seine
Seine
from the Louvre, at 14 rue Bonaparte (in the 6th arrondissement). The school has a history spanning more than 350 years, training many of the great artists in Europe
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Shoemaker
Shoemaking
Shoemaking
is the process of making footwear. Originally, shoes were made one at a time by hand. Traditional handicraft shoemaking has now been largely superseded in volume of shoes produced by industrial mass production of footwear, but not necessarily in quality, attention to detail, or craftsmanship. Shoemakers (also known as cordwainers) may produce a range of footwear items, including shoes, boots, sandals, clogs and moccasins. Such items are generally made of leather, wood, rubber, plastic, jute or other plant material, and often consist of multiple parts for better durability of the sole, stitched to a leather upper Trades that engage in shoemaking have included the cordwainer's and cobbler's trades
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Dowry
A dowry is a transfer of parental property, gifts or money at the marriage of a daughter.[1] Dowry
Dowry
contrasts with the related concepts of bride price and dower. While bride price or bride service is a payment by the groom or his family to the bride's parents, dowry is the wealth transferred from the bride's family to the groom or his family, ostensibly for the bride. Similarly, dower is the property settled on the bride herself, by the groom at the time of marriage, and which remains under her ownership and control.[2] Dowry
Dowry
is an ancient custom, and its existence may well predate records of it. Dowries continue to be expected, and demanded as a condition to accept a marriage proposal, in some parts of the world, mainly in parts of Asia, Northern Africa
Northern Africa
and the Balkans
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Musée Grévin
The Musée Grévin
Musée Grévin
(French: [myze ɡʁevɛ̃]; Euronext: GREV) is a wax museum in Paris
Paris
located on the Grands Boulevards in the 9th arrondissement on the right bank of the Seine, at 10, Boulevard Montmartre, Paris, France. It is open daily; an admission fee is charged. The musée Grévin is as well present in Montreal
Montreal
and Seoul.Contents1 History 2 Attractions 3 Grévin Montréal (2013) 4 Grévin Seoul
Seoul
(2015) 5 See also 6 Notes 7 External linksHistory[edit] The museum was founded in 1882 by Arthur Meyer, a journalist for Le Gaulois, and named for its first artistic director, caricaturist Alfred Grévin. It is one of the oldest wax museums in Europe. Its baroque architecture includes a hall of mirrors based on the principle of a catoptric cistula and a theater for magic shows
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