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George Washington
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George Washington
(February 22, 1732[b][c] – December 14, 1799) was an American political leader, military general, statesman, and Founding Father who served as the first president of the United States from 1789 to 1797. Previously, he led Patriot forces to victory in the nation's War for Independence. He presided at the Constitutional Convention of 1787 which established the U.S. Constitution and a federal government. Washington has been called the "Father of His Country" for his manifold leadership in the formative days of the new nation. Washington received his initial military training and command with the Virginia
Virginia
Regiment during the French and Indian War
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British America
British America
British America
refers to the English territories in North America (including Bermuda), Central America, the Caribbean, and Guyana
Guyana
from 1607 to 1783. Formally, the British colonies in North America
North America
were known as British America
British America
and the British West Indies
British West Indies
until 1776, when the Thirteen Colonies
Thirteen Colonies
declared their independence and formed the United States
United States
of America.[1] After that, the term British North America was used to describe the remainder of Britain's continental North American possessions
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Virginia House Of Burgesses
The Virginia
Virginia
House of Burgesses
House of Burgesses
/ˈbɜːrdʒəsɪz/ was the first legislative assembly of elected representatives in North America.[1] The House was established by the Virginia
Virginia
Company, which created the body as part of an effort to encourage English craftsmen to settle in North America, and to make conditions in the colony more agreeable for its current inhabitants.[2] From 1619 to 1776, the representative branch of the legislature of Virginia
Virginia
was the House of Burgesses, which governed in conjunction with a colonial governor and his council. Jamestown remained the capital of the Virginia
Virginia
colony until 1699, when the government was moved to Williamsburg
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British Army
The British Army
Army
is the principal land warfare force of the United Kingdom, a part of British Armed Forces. As of 2017, the British Army comprises just over 80,000 trained regular (full-time) personnel and just over 26,500 trained reserve (part-time) personnel.[4] Since April 2013, Ministry of Defence publications have not reported the entire strength of the Regular Reserve; instead, only Regular Reserves serving under the fixed-term reserve contracts have been counted.[5] The modern British Army
Army
traces back to 1707, with an antecedent in the English Army
Army
that was created during the Restoration in 1660
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Colonel (United Kingdom)
Colonel
Colonel
(Col) is a rank of the British Army
British Army
and Royal Marines, ranking below brigadier, and above lieutenant colonel. British colonels are not usually field commanders; typically they serve as staff officers between field commands at battalion and brigade level. The insignia is two diamond-shaped pips (properly called "Bath Stars") below a crown. The crown has varied in the past with different monarchs; the current Queen's reign has used St Edward's Crown. The rank is equivalent to captain in the Royal Navy
Royal Navy
and group captain in the Royal Air Force.Contents1 Etymology 2 History 3 Ceremonial usage 4 Royal Air Force 5 Historical insignia 6 Current insignia 7 See also 8 ReferencesEtymology[edit] The rank of colonel was popularized by the tercios that were employed in the Spanish Army
Spanish Army
during the 16th and 17th centuries
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Colonial Troops
Colonial troops
Colonial troops
or colonial army refers to various military units recruited from, or used as garrison troops in, colonial territories.Contents1 Colonial background 2 Origins 3 Basis of recruitment 4 Settler militia 5 Advantages of colonial troops 6 Disadvantages 7 Use outside areas of origin 8 United States 9 Symbolism 10 End of empires 11 Examples 12 References 13 Further reading 14 See alsoColonial background[edit] Such colonies may lie overseas or in areas dominated by neighbouring land powers such as China or Russia. Colonial troops
Colonial troops
have been used by Imperial powers whether ancient (such as Carthage[1] and Rome), or modern (such as Great Britain, France, Netherlands, Denmark, the United States, Germany, Italy, Spain, and Portugal). Sometimes they have been recruited under local leaders, as auxiliaries, at other times directly under pay and officers from the colonial power
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Hypovolemia
Hypovolemia is a state of decreased blood volume; more specifically, decrease in volume of blood plasma.[1][2] It is thus the intravascular component of volume contraction (or loss of blood volume due to things such as bleeding or dehydration), but, as it also is the most essential one, hypovolemia and volume contraction are sometimes used synonymously. Hypovolemia is characterized by sodium depletion (salt depletion) and thus differs from dehydration, which is defined as excessive loss of body water.[3]Contents1 Causes 2 Diagnosis2.1 Stages of hypovolemic shock3 Treatment3.1 Field care 3.2 Hospital treatment4 History 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksCauses[edit] Common causes of hypovolemia are:[4]Loss of blood (external or internal bleeding or blood donation[5]) Loss of plasma (severe burns[6][7] and lesions discharging fluid) Loss of body sodium and consequent intravascular water; e.g
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Colony Of Virginia
The Colony of Virginia, chartered in 1606 and settled in 1607, was the first enduring English colony in North America, following failed proprietary attempts at settlement on Newfoundland by Sir Humphrey Gilbert[2] in 1583, and the subsequent further south Roanoke Island (modern eastern North Carolina) by Sir Walter Raleigh
Sir Walter Raleigh
in the late 1580s. The founder of the new colony was the Virginia
Virginia
Company,[3] with the first two settlements in Jamestown on the north bank of the James River and Popham Colony
Popham Colony
on the Kennebec River
Kennebec River
in modern-day Maine, both in 1607. The Popham colony quickly failed due to a famine, disease, and conflict with local Native American tribes in the first two years
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Kingdom Of Great Britain
The Kingdom of Great Britain, officially called simply Great Britain,[1] was a sovereign state in western Europe from 1 May 1707 to 31 December 1800. The state came into being following the Treaty of Union in 1706, ratified by the Acts of Union 1707, which united the kingdoms of England
England
and Scotland
Scotland
to form a single kingdom encompassing the whole island of Great Britain
Great Britain
and its outlying islands, with the exception of the Isle of Man
Isle of Man
and the Channel Islands. It also did not include Ireland, which remained a separate realm. The unitary state was governed by a single parliament and government that was based in Westminster
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Thanks Of Congress
The Thanks of Congress is a series of formal resolutions passed by the United States Congress
United States Congress
originally to extend the government's formal thanks for significant victories or impressive actions by American military commanders and their troops. Although it began during the American Revolutionary War, the practice peaked during the American Civil War. Similarly, the Confederate Congress
Confederate Congress
also passed resolutions honoring extraordinary performance to individuals or military units.[1]Contents1 Early years 2 American Civil War 3 Others 4 Civil War recipients 5 See also 6 Notes 7 ReferencesEarly years[edit] During the American Revolution, the official Thanks of Congress from the Continental Congress
Continental Congress
was often accompanied by a specially struck commemorative gold or silver medal
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Congressional Gold Medal
A Congressional Gold Medal
Congressional Gold Medal
is an award bestowed by the United States Congress; the Congressional Gold Medal
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Lieutenant General (United States)
In the United States Army, United States Marine Corps, and the United States Air Force, lieutenant general (abbreviated LTG in the Army, Lt Gen in the Air Force, and LtGen in the Marine Corps) is a three-star general officer rank, with the pay grade of O-9. Lieutenant general ranks above major general and below general. Lieutenant general
Lieutenant general
is equivalent to the rank of vice admiral in the other uniformed services.Contents1 Statutory limits 2 Appointment and tour length 3 Retirement 4 History 5 Modern use 6 Famous lieutenant generals6.1 Historic 6.2 World War II 6.3 1950s through 1980s; Korean War, Vietnam War, Cold War 6.4 Post-Cold War7 See also 8 References 9 External linksStatutory limits[edit]U.S. lieutenant general flagsRank flag of a lieutenant general in the United States Army
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Independent Politician
An independent or nonpartisan politician is an individual politician not affiliated with any political party
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General
A general officer is an officer of high rank in the army, and in some nations' air forces or marines.[1] The term "general" is used in two ways: as the generic title for all grades of general officer and as a specific rank. It originates in the 16th century, as a shortening of captain general, which rank was taken from Middle French capitaine général. The adjective general had been affixed to officer designations since the late medieval period to indicate relative superiority or an extended jurisdiction. Today, the title of "General" is known in some countries as a four-star rank. However different countries use different systems of stars for senior ranks
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Vice President Of The United States
The Vice President of the United States
United States
(informally referred to as VPOTUS, or Veep) is a constitutional officer in the legislative branch of the federal government of the United States
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