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George III Of The United Kingdom
George III (George William Frederick; 4 June 1738[c] – 29 January 1820) was King of Great Britain
King of Great Britain
and King of Ireland
King of Ireland
from 25 October 1760 until the union of the two countries on 1 January 1801, after which he was King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain
Kingdom of Great Britain
and Ireland until his death. He was concurrently Duke and prince-elector of Brunswick- Lüneburg
Lüneburg
("Hanover") in the Holy Roman Empire
Holy Roman Empire
before becoming King of Hanover
King of Hanover
on 12 October 1814
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George III (other)
George III
George III
(1738–1820) was King of Great Britain and Ireland from 1760 to 1820. George III
George III
may also refer to: People[edit] George III
George III
of Georgia (died 1183) George III, Landgrave of Leuchtenberg (1502–1555) George III, Prince of Anhalt-Dessau
George III, Prince of Anhalt-Dessau
(1507–1553) George III, Count of Erbach-Breuberg (1548–1605) George III
George III
of Imereti (1605–1639) George III
George III
of Brieg (1611–1664) George III, Landgrave of Hesse-Itter
George III, Landgrave of Hesse-Itter
(1632–1676) George III
George III
of Guria (died 1684)This disambiguation page lists articles about people with the same name
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Prince Adolphus, Duke Of Cambridge
280,000 [1] - • Ethnicity (2011)[2] 66% White British 1.4% White Irish 15% White Other 1.7% Black British 3.2% Mixed Race 11% British Asian & Chinese 1.6% otherDemonym(s) CantabrigianTime zone Greenwich Mean Time
Greenwich Mean Time
(UTC+0) • Summer (DST) BST (UTC+1)Postcode CB1 – CB5Area code(s) 01223ONS code 12UB (ONS) E07000008 (GSS)OS grid reference TL450588Website www.cambridge.gov.uk Cambridge
Cambridge
(/ˈkeɪmbrɪdʒ/[3] KAYM-brij) is a university city and the county town of Cambridgeshire, England, on the River Cam
River Cam
approximately 50 miles (80 km) north of London
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Mental Disorder
A mental disorder, also called a mental illness[2] or psychiatric disorder, is a behavioral or mental pattern that causes significant distress or impairment of personal functioning.[3] Such features may be persistent, relapsing and remitting, or occur as a single episode. Many disorders have been described, with signs and symptoms that vary widely between specific disorders.[4][5] Such disorders may be diagnosed by a mental health professional. The causes of mental disorders are often unclear. Theories may incorporate findings from a range of fields. Mental disorders are usually defined by a combination of how a person behaves, feels, perceives, or thinks.[4] This may be associated with particular regions or functions of the brain, often in a social context. A mental disorder is one aspect of mental health
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Battle Of Waterloo
Seventh Coalition: United Kingdom  Netherlands  Prussia Hanover Nassau BrunswickCommanders and leaders Napoleon
Napoleon
Bonaparte Duke of Wellington Gebhard Leberecht von BlücherStrengthTotal: 73,000[1]50,700 infantry 14,390 cavalry 8,050 artillery and engineers 252 gunsTotal: 118,000 Anglo-allies: 68,000[2][3]United Kingdom: 25,000 British and 6,000 King's German Legion Netherlands: 17,000 Hanover: 11,000 Brunswick: 6,000 Nassau: 3,000[4] 156 guns[5]Prussians: 50,000[6]Casualties and lossesTotal: 41,00024,000 to 26,000 casualties, includin
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Napoleon
Napoléon Bonaparte (15 August 1769 – 5 May 1821) was a French statesman and military leader who rose to prominence during the French Revolution and led several successful campaigns during the French Revolutionary Wars. As Napoleon, he was Emperor of the French
Emperor of the French
from 1804 until 1814, and again briefly in 1815 during the Hundred Days. Napoleon
Napoleon
dominated European and global affairs for more than a decade while leading France
France
against a series of coalitions in the Napoleonic Wars. He won most of these wars and the vast majority of his battles, building a large empire that ruled over continental Europe before its final collapse in 1815. He is considered one of the greatest commanders in history, and his wars and campaigns are studied at military schools worldwide
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First French Empire
French Revolutionary Wars •  Constitution adopted 18 May 1804 •  Coronation of Napoleon
Napoleon
I 2 December 1804 •  Treaty of Tilsit 7 July 1807 •  Invasion of Russia 24 June 1812 •  Treaty of Fontainebleau 11 April 1814 •  Hundred Days 20 March – 7 July 1815Area •  1812 [4] 860,000 km2 (330,000 sq mi)Population
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French Revolution
The French Revolution
Revolution
(French: Révolution française [ʁevɔlysjɔ̃ fʁɑ̃sɛːz]) was a period of far-reaching social and political upheaval in France
France
and its colonies that lasted from 1789 until 1799. It was partially carried forward by Napoleon
Napoleon
during the later expansion of the French Empire. The Revolution
Revolution
overthrew the monarchy, established a republic, catalyzed violent periods of political turmoil, and finally culminated in a dictatorship under Napoleon
Napoleon
who brought many of its principles to areas he conquered in Western Europe and beyond
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Old Style And New Style Dates
Old Style (O.S.) and New Style (N.S.) are terms sometimes used with dates to indicate that the calendar convention used at the time described is different from that in use at the time the document was being written. There were two calendar changes in Great Britain and its colonies, which may sometimes complicate matters: the first change was to change the start of the year from Lady Day
Lady Day
(25 March) to 1 January; the second was to discard the Julian calendar
Julian calendar
in favour of the Gregorian calendar.[2][3][4] Closely related is the custom of dual dating, where writers gave two consecutive years to reflect differences in the starting date of the year, or to include both the Julian and Gregorian dates. Beginning in 1582, the Gregorian calendar
Gregorian calendar
replaced the Julian in Roman Catholic countries
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Norfolk House
Coordinates: 51°30′26″N 0°8′2″W / 51.50722°N 0.13389°W / 51.50722; -0.13389 Norfolk House
Norfolk House
is on the far right on this mid-18th-century engraving.Norfolk House, at 31 St James's Square, Westminster, was built in 1722 for Thomas Howard, 8th Duke of Norfolk. It was a royal residence for a short time, after the 9th Duke of Norfolk offered it to Frederick, Prince of Wales, following his marriage in 1736 to Princess Augusta of Saxe-Gotha. The couple lived there 1737–1741, and their son King George III
King George III
was born in the house
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St. James's Square
St James's
St James's
Square is the only square in the exclusive St James's district of the City of Westminster. It has predominantly Georgian and Neo- Georgian architecture
Georgian architecture
and a garden in the centre. For its first two hundred or so years it was one of the three or four most fashionable residential multi-owner estates in London. It is now home to the headquarters of a number of well-known businesses, including BP and Rio Tinto Group; to four private members' clubs, the East India Club, the Naval and Military Club, the Canning Club, and the Army and Navy Club; to the High Commission of Cyprus; and to the London Library. Also based in the square is the premises of the think tank Chatham House
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Seven Years' War
Anglo-Prusso-Portuguese coalition victoryTreaty of Saint Petersburg (1762) Treaty of Hamburg (1762) Treaty of Paris (1763) Treaty of Hubertusburg
Treaty of Hubertusburg
(1763)Territorial changes Status quo ante bellum in Europe. Transfer of colonial possessions between Great Britain, France, Spain, and Portugal.France cedes its possessions east of the Mississippi River, Canada (except Saint-Pierre and Miquelon), the island of Grenada, and the Northern Circars
Northern Circars
in India
India
to Great Britain. France cedes Louisiana
Louisiana
and its territory west of the Mississippi River to Spain. Spain
Spain
cedes Florida to Great Britain. Four "neutral" Caribbean
Caribbean
islands divided between Britain (St. Vincent, Tobago, Dominica) and France (St
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Holy Roman Empire
The Holy Roman Empire
Roman Empire
(Latin: Sacrum Romanum Imperium; German: Heiliges Römisches Reich) was a multi-ethnic complex of territories in central Europe that developed during the Early Middle Ages
Middle Ages
and continued until its dissolution in 1806.[6] The largest territory of the empire after 962 was the Kingdom of Germany, though it also came to include the Kingdom of Bohemia, the Kingdom of Burgundy, the Kingdom of Italy, and numerous other territories.[7][8][9] On 25 December 800, Pope Leo III crowned the Frankish king Charlemagne as Emperor, reviving the title in Western Europe, more than three centuries after the fall of the Western Roman Empire
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King Of Ireland
A monarchical system of government existed in Ireland
Ireland
from ancient times until, for what became the Republic of Ireland, the mid-twentieth century. Northern Ireland, as part of the United Kingdom, remains under a monarchical system of government. The Gaelic kingdoms of Ireland
Ireland
ended with the Norman invasion of Ireland, when the kingdom became a fief of the Holy See
Holy See
under the Lordship of the King of England. This lasted until the Parliament of Ireland
Ireland
conferred the Crown of Ireland
Ireland
upon King Henry VIII of England
King Henry VIII of England
during the English Reformation. The monarch of England held the crowns of England and Ireland
Ireland
in a personal union. The Union of the Crowns
Union of the Crowns
in 1603 expanded the personal union to include Scotland
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Protestant
Protestantism
Protestantism
is the second largest form of Christianity
Christianity
with collectively more than 900 million adherents worldwide or nearly 40% of all Christians.[1][2][3][a] It originated with the Reformation,[b] a movement against what its followers con
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Prince-elector
The prince-electors (or simply electors) of the Holy Roman Empire (German: Kurfürst ( listen (help·info)), pl. Kurfürsten, Czech: Kurfiřt, Latin: Princeps Elector) were the members of the electoral college of the Holy Roman Empire. From the 13th century onwards, the Prince-Electors had the privilege of electing the King of the Romans, who would be crowned by the Pope as Holy Roman Emperor. Charles V was the last to be a crowned Emperor (elected 1519, crowned 1530); his successors were elected Emperors directly by the electoral college, each being titled "Elected Emperor of the Romans" (German: erwählter Römischer Kaiser; Latin: electus Romanorum imperator)
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