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George Gustav Heye Center
The George Gustav Heye
George Gustav Heye
Center is a branch of the National Museum of the American Indian in Manhattan, New York City.[1] The museum is part of the Smithsonian Institution. The Center features contemporary and historical exhibits of art and artifacts by and about Native Americans.Contents1 History 2 Galleries 3 Past exhibits 4 Gallery 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] The center is named for George Gustav Heye, who began collecting Native American artifacts in 1903 and opened the Museum of the American Indian on Audubon Terrace
Audubon Terrace
in upper Manhattan
Manhattan
in 1922. That museum closed in 1994 and part of the collection is now housed at the Alexander Hamilton U.S. Custom House
Alexander Hamilton U.S. Custom House
on Bowling Green in Lower Manhattan. The Beaux Arts-style building, designed by architect Cass Gilbert, was completed in 1907
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Anishnaabe
Anishinaabe
Anishinaabe
(or Anishinabe, plural: Anishinaabeg) is the autonym for a group of culturally related Indigenous Peoples in Canada
Canada
and the United States
United States
that include the Odawa, Ojibwe, Potawatomi, Oji-Cree, Mississaugas, Chippewa, and Algonquin peoples. The Anishinaabeg speak Anishinaabemowin, or Anishinaabe
Anishinaabe
languages that belong to the Algonquian language family. They traditionally have lived in the Northeast Woodlands and Subarctic. The word Anishinaabeg translates to "people from whence lowered." Another definition refers to "the good humans," meaning those who are on the right road or path given to them by the Creator Gitche Manitou, or Great Spirit
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Tlingit People
The Tlingit
Tlingit
(/ˈklɪŋkɪt/ or /ˈtlɪŋɡɪt/; also spelled Tlinkit) are Indigenous peoples of the Pacific Northwest Coast
Indigenous peoples of the Pacific Northwest Coast
of North America.[2] Their language is Lingít,[3] meaning "People of the Tides"[4] (pronounced [ɬɪnkɪ́t]). The Russian name Koloshi (Колоши, from a Sugpiaq- Alutiiq
Alutiiq
term kulut'ruaq for the labret worn by women) or the related German name Koulischen may be encountered referring to the people in older historical literature, such as Shelikhov's 1796 map of Russian America.[5] The Tlingit
Tlingit
have a matrilineal kinship system, with children considered born into the mother's clan, and property and hereditary roles passing through the mother's line.[6] Their culture and society developed in the temperate rainforest of the southeast Alaska
Alaska
coast and the Alexander Archipelago
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Upper Manhattan
Upper Manhattan
Manhattan
denotes the most northern region of the New York City Borough of Manhattan
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Lower Manhattan
Lower Manhattan, also known as Downtown
Downtown
Manhattan, is the southernmost part of Manhattan, the central borough for business, culture, and government in the City of New York, which itself originated at the southern tip of Manhattan
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Beaux-Arts Architecture
Beaux-Arts architecture
Beaux-Arts architecture
(/ˌboʊˈzɑːr/; French: [bozaʁ]) was the academic architectural style taught at the École des Beaux-Arts in Paris, particularly from the 1830s to the end of the 19th century. It drew upon the principles of French neoclassicism, but also incorporated Gothic, and Renaissance
Renaissance
elements, and used modern materials, such as iron and glass. It was an important style in France until the end of the 19th century
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Reginald Marsh (artist)
Reginald Marsh (March 14, 1898 – July 3, 1954) was an American painter, born in Paris, most notable for his depictions of life in New York City in the 1920s and 1930s. Crowded Coney Island
Coney Island
beach scenes, popular entertainments such as vaudeville and burlesque, women, and jobless men on the Bowery
Bowery
are subjects that reappear throughout his work
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Laguna Pueblo
The Laguna Pueblo
Pueblo
(Western Keres: Kawaika [kʰɑwɑjkʰɑ]) is a federally recognized tribe of Native American Pueblo people
Pueblo people
in west-central New Mexico, USA
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New Mexico
New Mexico
Mexico
(Spanish: Nuevo México pronounced [ˈnweβo ˈmexiko], Navajo: Yootó Hahoodzo pronounced [jòːtxó xɑ̀xʷòːtsò]) is a state in the Southwestern Region of the United States of America. With a population of approximately two million, New Mexico
Mexico
is the 36th most populous state. With a total area of 121,590 sq mi (314,900 km2), it is the fifth largest and fifth least densely populated of the fifty states. It is one of the Mountain States
Mountain States
and shares the Four Corners
Four Corners
region with Utah, Colorado, and Arizona. Its capital and cultural center is Santa Fe, while its largest city is Albuquerque
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Ojibwe
The Ojibwe, Ojibwa, or Chippewa are an Anishinaabeg
Anishinaabeg
group of Indigenous Peoples in North America
North America
known internally as Turtle Island. They live in Canada
Canada
and the United States
United States
and are one of the largest Indigenous ethnic groups north of the Rio Grande. In Canada, they are the second-largest First Nations
First Nations
population, surpassed only by the Cree. In the United States, they have the fifth-largest population among Native American tribes, surpassed only by the Navajo, Cherokee, Choctaw
Choctaw
and Lakota-Dakota-Nakota people. The Ojibwe
Ojibwe
people traditionally have spoken the Ojibwe
Ojibwe
language, a branch of the Algonquian language family
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W (New York City Subway Service)
The W Broadway Local is a rapid transit service of the New York City Subway's B Division. Its route emblem, or "bullet", is colored yellow since it uses the BMT Broadway Line
BMT Broadway Line
in Manhattan.[2] The W operates weekdays only except late nights between Ditmars Boulevard in Astoria, Queens
Queens
and South Ferry/Whitehall Street in Lower Manhattan, making local stops along its entire route; limited rush hour service is extended beyond Whitehall Street to/from 86th Street in Gravesend, Brooklyn, making local stops in Brooklyn.[3] The W is internally staffed and scheduled as part of the N.[4][5][6] Introduced on July 22, 2001, the W ran at all times on the BMT West End Line and BMT Fourth Avenue Line
BMT Fourth Avenue Line
in Brooklyn
Brooklyn
to Coney Island–Stillwell Avenue
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National Gallery Of Canada
The National Gallery of Canada
Canada
(French: Musée des beaux-arts du Canada), located in the capital city of Ottawa, Ontario, is Canada's premier art gallery.[1] The Gallery is now housed in a glass and granite building on Sussex Drive with a notable view of the Canadian Parliament buildings on Parliament Hill
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Inuit
WikiProjectIndigenous North Americans First NationsCommons Wiktionary InuitCommons Wiktionary MétisCommons Wiktionary vte The Inuit
Inuit
(/ˈɪnjuɪt/; syllabics: ᐃᓄᐃᑦ, "the people", singular: Inuk)[6] are a group of culturally similar indigenous peoples inhabiting the Arctic
Arctic
regions of Greenland, Canada, and Alaska.[7] The Inuit languages
Inuit languages
are part of the Eskimo– Aleut
Aleut
family.[8] Inuit Sign Language
Inuit Sign Language
is a critically endangered language isolate used in Nunavut.[9] In Canada
Canada
and the States, the term "Eskimo" was commonly used by ethnic Europeans to describe the Inuit
Inuit
and Siberia's and Alaska's Yupik and Iñupiat
Iñupiat
peoples
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Sobey Art Award
The Sobey Art Award is Canada's largest prize for young Canadian artists.[1] It is named after Canadian businessperson and art collector Frank H. Sobey, who established The Sobey Art Foundation. It is an annual prize given to an artist 40 and under who has exhibited in a public or commercial art gallery within 18 months of being nominated. A jury consisting of an international juror and representatives of galleries from the West Coast and the Yukon, the Prairies and the North, Ontario, Quebec and the Atlantic Provinces creates a longlist of 25 artists, five from each region. The jury meets to select the winner and four other finalists, one from each region.[2] 2017 was the first year to see the shortlist dominated by women and also the first year that more than one Indigenous artist was shortlisted.[3] Up to 2013, a total of $70,000 in prize money was awarded each time the prize was presented; $50,000 to the winner and $5,000 to the other four finalists
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Skateboarding
Skateboarding
Skateboarding
is an action sport which involves riding and performing tricks using a skateboard, as well as a recreational activity, an art form, a entertainment industry job, and a method of transportation.[1] Skateboarding
Skateboarding
has been shaped and influenced by many skateboarders throughout the years
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Luiseno
The Luiseño, or Payómkawichum, are a Native American people who at the time of the first contacts with the Spanish in the 16th century inhabited the coastal area of southern California, ranging 50 miles from the present-day southern part of Los Angeles County to the northern part of San Diego County, and inland 30 miles. In the Luiseño language, the people call themselves Payómkawichum (also spelled Payómkowishum), meaning "People of the West."[3] The tribe was named Luiseño by the Spanish due to their proximity to the Mission San Luís Rey de Francia (The Mission of Saint Louis King of France.)[4] Known as the "King of the Missions," it was founded on June 13, 1798 by Father Fermín Francisco de Lasuén, located in what is now Oceanside, California, in northern San Diego County. It was the Spanish First Military District. Today there are six federally recognized tribes of Luiseño bands based in southern California, all with reservations
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