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Genius Loci
In classical Roman religion, a genius loci (plural genii loci) was the protective spirit of a place. It was often depicted in religious iconography as a figure holding attributes such as a cornucopia, patera (libation bowl) or snake. Many Roman altars found throughout the Western Roman Empire
Western Roman Empire
were dedicated to a particular genius locus. The Roman imperial cults of the Emperor and the imperial house developed in part in connections with the sacrifices made by neighborhood associations (vici) to the local genius
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Genius Loci (novel)
Genius Loci is a novel by Ben Aaronovitch, focusing on the early career of Bernice "Benny" Summerfield, a character from the spin-off media based on the long-running British science fiction television series Doctor Who. This was the first of Big Finish's Bernice Summerfield novels to be released under the New Worlds format. The book is set before Benny met the Doctor and was not officially licensed by the BBC
BBC
(as owners of Doctor Who), but does contain some allusions to Doctor Who, specifically the Silurians as depicted in the television series and in the Virgin New Adventures
Virgin New Adventures
spin-off novels. The book also references Benny's back-story as explored in the New Adventures. Plot summary[edit] A young Bernice Summerfield
Bernice Summerfield
lands a job as an archaeologist on a colony world
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Phenomenology (philosophy)
Phenomenology (from Greek phainómenon "that which appears" and lógos "study") is the philosophical study of the structures of experience and consciousness. As a philosophical movement it was founded in the early years of the 20th century by Edmund Husserl
Edmund Husserl
and was later expanded upon by a circle of his followers at the universities of Göttingen and Munich in Germany. It then spread to France, the United States, and elsewhere, often in contexts far removed from Husserl's early work.[1] Phenomenology should not be considered as a unitary movement; rather, different authors share a common family resemblance but also with many significant differences. Accordingly:A unique and final definition of phenomenology is dangerous and perhaps even paradoxical as it lacks a thematic focus
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Garden
A garden is a planned space, usually outdoors, set aside for the display, cultivation and enjoyment of plants and other forms of nature. The garden can incorporate both natural and man-made materials. The most common form today is known as a residential garden, but the term garden has traditionally been a more general one. Zoos, which display wild animals in simulated natural habitats, were formerly called zoological gardens.[1][2] Western gardens are almost universally based on plants, with garden often signifying a shortened form of botanical garden. Some traditional types of eastern gardens, such as Zen gardens, use plants sparsely or not at all
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Landscape Architecture
Landscape architecture
Landscape architecture
is the design of outdoor areas, landmarks, and structures to achieve environmental, social-behavioural, or aesthetic outcomes.[2] It involves the systematic investigation of existing social, ecological, and soil conditions and processes in the landscape, and the design of interventions that will produce the desired outcome. The scope of the profession includes landscape design; site planning; stormwater management; erosion control; environmental restoration; parks and recreation planning; visual resource management; green infrastructure planning and provision; and private estate and residence landscape master planning and design; all at varying scales of design, planning and management
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A Priori And A Posteriori
The Latin
Latin
phrases a priori (lit. "from the earlier") and a posteriori (lit. "from the latter") are philosophical terms of art popularized by Immanuel Kant's Critique of Pure Reason
Critique of Pure Reason
(first published in 1781, second edition in 1787), one of the most influential works in the history of philosophy.[1] However, in their Latin
Latin
forms they appear in Latin
Latin
translations of Euclid's Elements, of about 300 BCE, a work widely considered during the early European modern period as the model for precise thinking. These terms are used with respect to reasoning (epistemology) to distinguish "necessary conclusions from first premises" (i.e., what must come before sense observation) from "conclusions based on sense observation" (which must follow it)
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Archetype
The concept of an archetype /ˈɑːrkɪtaɪp/ appears in areas relating to behavior, modern psychological theory, and literary analysis. An archetype can be:a statement, pattern of behavior, or prototype (model) which other statements, patterns of behavior, and objects copy or emulate. (Frequently used informal synonyms for this usage include "standard example", "basic example", and the longer form "archetypal example". Mathematical archetypes often appear as "canonical examples".) a Platonic philosophical idea referring to pure forms which embody the fundamental characteristics of a thing in Platonism a collectively-inherited unconscious idea, pattern of thought, image, etc., that is universally present, in individual psyches, as in Jungian psychology a constantly recurring symbol or motif in literature, painting, or mythology (this usage of the term draws from both comparative anthropology and from Jungian archetypal theory)
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Aldo Rossi
Aldo Rossi
Aldo Rossi
(3 May 1931 – 4 September 1997) was an Italian architect and designer who achieved international recognition in four distinct areas: theory, drawing, architecture and product design.[1] He was the first Italian to receive the Pritzker Prize[2] for architecture.Contents1 Early life 2 Career 3 Work 4 Exhibits 5 Awards 6 Architecture 7 Product design 8 Publications 9 References 10 Further reading 11 External linksEarly life[edit] He was born in Milan, Italy. After early education by the Somascan Religious Order and then at Alessandro Volta College in Lecco, in 1949 he went to the school of architecture at the Polytechnic University of Milan. His thesis advisor was Piero Portaluppi and he graduated in 1959. In 1955 he had started writing for, and from 1959 was one of the editors of, the architectural magazine Casabella-Continuità, with editor in chief Ernesto Nathan Rogers
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Giuseppe Terragni
Giuseppe Terragni (Italian: [dʒuˈzɛppe terˈraɲɲi]; 18 April 1904 – 19 July 1943) was an Italian architect who worked primarily under the fascist regime of Benito Mussolini
Benito Mussolini
and pioneered the Italian modern movement under the rubric of Rationalism.[1] His most famous work is the Casa del Fascio built in Como, northern Italy, which was begun in 1932 and completed in 1936;[1] it was built in accordance with the International Style of architecture and frescoed by abstract artist Mario Radice. In 1938, at the behest of Mussolini's fascist government, Terragni designed the Danteum, an unbuilt monument to the Italian poet Dante Alighieri
Dante Alighieri
structured around the formal divisions of his greatest work, the Divine Comedy.[2]Contents1 Biography 2 See also 3 References 4 BibliographyBiography[edit] Giuseppe Terragni was born in Meda, Lombardy
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Giorgio Grassi
Giorgio Grassi
Giorgio Grassi
(born 1935) is one of Italy's most important modern architects, and part of the so-called Italian rationalist school, also known as La Tendenza, associated most famously with Carlo Aymonino and Aldo Rossi
Aldo Rossi
that emerged in Italy
Italy
in the 1960s. Much influenced by Ludwig Hilberseimer, Heinrich Tessenow
Heinrich Tessenow
and Adolf Loos, Grassi's architecture is the most severely rational of the group: his extremely formal work is predicated on absolute simplicity, clarity, and honesty without ingratiation, rhetoric, or spectacular shape-making; it refers to historical archetypes of form and space and has a strong concern with the making of urban space
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Vernacular
A vernacular or vernacular language is the native language or native dialect (usually colloquial or informal) of a specific population, especially as distinguished from a literary, national or standard variety of the language, or a lingua franca (also called a vehicular language) used in the region or state inhabited by that population. Some linguists use "vernacular" and "nonstandard dialect" as synonyms.[1]The oldest known vernacular manuscript in Scanian (Danish, c
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Christian Norberg-Schulz
Christian Norberg-Schulz (23 May 1926– 28 March 2000) was a Norwegian architect, author, educator and architectural theorist. Norberg-Schulz was part of the Modernist
Modernist
Movement in architecture and associated with architectural phenomenology.[1][2]Contents1 Biography 2 Personal life 3 In popular culture 4 Books in English by Norberg-Schulz 5 Primary source 6 References 7 External linksBiography[edit] Thorvald Christian Norberg-Schulz was born in Oslo, Norway. He was educated at the Eidgenossische Technische Hochschule
Eidgenossische Technische Hochschule
in Zurich
Zurich
in 1949 with subsequent studies in Rome. He studied at Harvard University under a Fulbright scholarship
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Numen
Numen, pl. numina, is a Latin
Latin
term for "divinity", or a "divine presence", "divine will." The Latin
Latin
authors defined it as follows.[1] Cicero
Cicero
writes of a "divine mind" (divina mens), a god "whose numen everything obeys," and a "divine power" (vim divinam) "which pervades the lives of men." It causes the motions and cries of birds during augury.[2] In Virgil's recounting of the blinding of the one-eyed giant, Polyphemus, from the Odyssey, in his Aeneid, he has Odysseus and his men first "ask for the assistance of the great numina" (magna precati numina).[3] Reviewing public opinion of Augustus
Augustus
on the day of his funeral, the historian Tacitus
Tacitus
reports that some thought "no honor was left to the gods" when he "established the cult of himself" (se ..
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Fantasy
Fantasy
Fantasy
is a genre of fiction set in a fictional universe, often without any locations, events, or people referencing the real world. Its roots are in oral traditions, which then became literature and drama. From the twentieth century it has expanded further into various media, including film, television, graphic novels and video games. Fantasy
Fantasy
is a subgenre of speculative fiction and is distinguished from the genres of science fiction and horror by the absence of scientific or macabre themes respectively, though these genres overlap. In popular culture, the fantasy genre is predominantly of the medievalist form
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Dungeons And Dragons
Dungeons & Dragons (abbreviated as D&D[2] or DnD) is a fantasy tabletop role-playing game (RPG) originally designed by Gary Gygax
Gary Gygax
and Dave Arneson. It was first published in 1974 by Tactical Studies Rules, Inc. (TSR). The game has been published by Wizards of the Coast (now a subsidiary of Hasbro) since 1997. It was derived from miniature wargames with a variation of Chainmail serving as the initial rule system.[3] D&D's publication is commonly recognized as the beginning of modern role-playing games and the role-playing game industry.[4] D&D departs from traditional wargaming and assigns each player a specific character to play instead of a military formation. These characters embark upon imaginary adventures within a fantasy setting. A Dungeon Master
Dungeon Master
serves as the game's referee and storyteller while maintaining the setting in which the adventures occur, and playing the role of the inhabitants
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Spirit
A spirit is a supernatural being, often but not exclusively a non-physical entity; such as a ghost, fairy, or angel.[1] The concepts of a person's spirit and soul, often also overlap, as both are either contrasted with or given ontological priority over the body and both are believed to survive bodily death in some religions,[2] and "spirit" can also have the sense of "ghost", i.e. a manifestation of the spirit of a deceased person
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