HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff

picture info

Gas-operated Reloading
Gas-operation is a system of operation used to provide energy to operate autoloading firearms. In gas operation, a portion of high-pressure gas from the cartridge being fired is used to power a mechanism to extract the spent case and insert a new cartridge into the chamber. Energy from the gas is harnessed through either a port in the barrel or a trap at the muzzle. This high-pressure gas impinges on a surface such as a piston head to provide motion for unlocking of the action, extraction of the spent case, ejection, cocking of the hammer or striker, chambering of a fresh cartridge, and locking of the action
[...More...]

picture info

John Browning
John Moses Browning (January 23, 1855[1] – November 26, 1926) was an American firearms designer who developed many varieties of military and civilian firearms, cartridges, and gun mechanisms, many of which are still in use around the world.[2] He is regarded as one of the most successful firearms designers of the 20th century, in the development of modern automatic and semi-automatic firearms, and is credited with 128 firearm patents.[3] He made his first firearm at age 13 in his father's gun shop, and was awarded his first patent on October 7, 1879 at the age of 24.[4] Browning influenced nearly all categories of firearms design. He invented or made significant improvements to single-shot, lever-action, and pump-action, rifles and shotguns. His most significant contributions were arguably in the area of autoloading firearms
[...More...]

Vickers Machine Gun
The Vickers machine gun or Vickers gun is a name primarily used to refer to the water-cooled .303 British (7.7 mm) machine gun produced by Vickers Limited, originally for the British Army. The machine gun typically required a six to eight-man team to operate: one fired, one fed the ammunition, the rest helped to carry the weapon, its ammunition, and spare parts.[1] It was in service from before the First World War until the 1960s, with air-cooled versions of it on many Allied World War I fighter aircraft. The weapon had a reputation for great solidity and reliability. Ian V. Hogg, in Weapons & War Machines, describes an action that took place in August 1916, during which the British 100th Company of the Machine Gun Corps fired their ten Vickers guns continuously for twelve hours. Using 100 barrels, they fired a million rounds without a failure
[...More...]

picture info

Blank-firing Adapter
A blank-firing adapter or blank-firing attachment (BFA), sometimes called a blank adapter or blank attachment, is a device used in conjunction with blank ammunition. Blank firing adapters are required for allowing blanks to cycle most automatic firearms. It can also be a safety feature designed so if a live round is mistakenly fired, most of the energy is spent smashing through the BFA reducing both the range and damage inflicted
[...More...]

picture info

.22 LR
The .22 Long Rifle
Rifle
(metric designation: 5.6×15mmR) cartridge is a long-established variety of .22 caliber rimfire ammunition, and in terms of units sold is still by far the most common ammunition in the world today. The cartridge is often referred to simply as .22 LR ("twenty-two-/ɛl/-/ɑːr/") and various rifles, pistols, revolvers, submachine guns and even some smoothbore shotguns (No. 1 bore) have been manufactured in this caliber.Contents1 History 2 Popularity in the US 3 Performance 4 Variants4.1 Subsonic 4.2 Standard velocity 4.3 High velocity 4.4 Hyper-velocity 4.5 Shot cartridges 4.6 Full metal jacket 4.7 Tracer5 Cartridge construction 6 Cartridge length 7 Usage 8 Cartridge dimensions 9 Muzzle velocity
Muzzle velocity
(nominal) 10 See also 11 References 12 External linksHistory[edit] American firearms manufacturer J
[...More...]

picture info

Mass
Mass
Mass
is both a property of a physical body and a measure of its resistance to acceleration (a change in its state of motion) when a net force is applied.[1] It also determines the strength of its mutual gravitational attraction to other bodies. The basic SI unit
SI unit
of mass is the kilogram (kg). In physics, mass is not the same as weight, even though mass is often determined by measuring the object's weight using a spring scale, rather than balance scale comparing it directly with known masses. An object on the Moon
Moon
would weigh less than it does on Earth
Earth
because of the lower gravity, but it would still have the same mass. This is because weight is a force, while mass is the property that (along with gravity) determines the strength of this force. In Newtonian physics, mass can be generalized as the amount of matter in an object
[...More...]

picture info

Momentum
In Newtonian mechanics, linear momentum, translational momentum, or simply momentum (pl. momenta) is the product of the mass and velocity of an object. It can be more generally stated as a measure of how hard it is to stop a moving object. It is a three-dimensional vector quantity, possessing a magnitude and a direction. If m is an object's mass and v is the velocity (also a vector), then the momentum is p = m v , displaystyle mathbf p =mmathbf v , In SI units, it is measured in kilogram meters per second (kg⋅m/s). Newton's second law
Newton's second law
of motion states that a body's rate of change in momentum is equal to the net force acting on it. Momentum
Momentum
depends on the frame of reference, but in any inertial frame it is a conserved quantity, meaning that if a closed system is not affected by external forces, its total linear momentum does not change
[...More...]

picture info

Center Of Mass
In physics, the center of mass of a distribution of mass in space is the unique point where the weighted relative position of the distributed mass sums to zero, or the point where if a force is applied it moves in the direction of the force without rotating. The distribution of mass is balanced around the center of mass and the average of the weighted position coordinates of the distributed mass defines its coordinates. Calculations in mechanics are often simplified when formulated with respect to the center of mass. It is a hypothetical point where entire mass of an object may be assumed to be concentrated to visualise its motion. In other words, the center of mass is the particle equivalent of a given object for application of Newton's laws of motion. In the case of a single rigid body, the center of mass is fixed in relation to the body, and if the body has uniform density, it will be located at the centroid
[...More...]

picture info

Hiram Stevens Maxim
Sir Hiram Stevens Maxim (5 February 1840 – 24 November 1916) was an American-born British inventor, best known as the creator of the Maxim Gun, the first portable fully automatic machine gun.[1] Maxim held patents on numerous mechanical devices such as a mousetrap, hair-curling irons, and steam pumps, and laid claim to inventing the lightbulb.[2] [3] He also experimented with powered flight but his large aircraft designs were never successeful, however, his "Captive Flying Machine" amusement ride, designed as a means by which to fund his research while generating public interest in flight, was highly successful.[4][5] Maxim moved from the United States
[...More...]

picture info

General Purpose Machine Gun
A general-purpose machine gun (GPMG) is an air-cooled fully automatic weapon that can be adapted to either the light or medium machine gun roles.[1] It may have a quick change barrel, and is suited for a variety of roles, from bipod- or tripod-mounted infantry support, to deployment as a helicopter door gun, or a vehicle-mounted support weapon.[2] Modern GPMGs fire full-powered rifle cartridges such as the 7.62×51mm NATO, 7.62×54mmR, 7.5×54mm French, 7.5×55mm Swiss, and 7.92×57mm Mauser.Contents1 History 2 Post-WWII examples 3 Gallery 4 See also 5 ReferencesHistory[edit] "With the MG 34, the German Wehrmacht introduced an entirely new concept in automatic firepower – the Einheitsmaschinengewehr general-purpose machine gun (GPMG).[3][4][5] In itself the MG 34
[...More...]

picture info

Bolt (firearms)
A bolt is the part of a repeating, breech-loading firearm that blocks the rear of the chamber while the propellant burns and moves to facilitate loading of cartridges from the magazine. The extractor and firing pin are often integral parts of the boltContents1 Description 2 Closed bolt vs. Open bolt 3 Gallery 4 See also 5 ReferencesDescription[edit] In manually operated firearms, such as bolt-action, lever-action, and pump-action rifles and shotguns, the bolt is held fixed by its locking lugs during firing, forcing all the expanding gas forward, and is manually withdrawn to chamber another round. In an automatic or semi-automatic firearm, the bolt cycles back and forward between each shot, propelled by recoil or expanding gas (back) or the recoil spring (forward). When it moves back, the extractor pulls the spent casing from the chamber
[...More...]

picture info

Colt Service Ace
The Colt Ace
Colt Ace
or Colt Service Model Ace is a firearm that was designed to allow inexpensive and low-recoil practice while maintaining the feel of the military Model 1911
Model 1911
pistol. History[edit] While the Colt 1911
Colt 1911
was chambered in the powerful .45 ACP
.45 ACP
cartridge, the externally similar Colt Ace
Colt Ace
was chambered for the far less powerful .22 LR
.22 LR
cartridge. Accordingly, military, police, or civilian shooters could shoot the Ace without the recoil and expense of the 1911, but with similar ergonomics, recoil and sight picture. Except for the earliest models, the barrels of these guns are constructed with a hinged floating rear chamber that amplifies the recoil, cycling the heavy slide.[2] The floating chamber can become fouled and stuck leading to poor feeding
[...More...]

picture info

Pressure
Pressure
Pressure
(symbol: p or P) is the force applied perpendicular to the surface of an object per unit area over which that force is distributed. Gauge pressure
Gauge pressure
(also spelled gage pressure)[a] is the pressure relative to the ambient pressure. Various units are used to express pressure. Some of these derive from a unit of force divided by a unit of area; the SI unit
SI unit
of pressure, the pascal (Pa), for example, is one newton per square metre; similarly, the pound-force per square inch (psi) is the traditional unit of pressure in the imperial and US customary systems. Pressure may also be expressed in terms of standard atmospheric pressure; the atmosphere (atm) is equal to this pressure, and the torr is defined as ​1⁄760 of this
[...More...]

picture info

M1922 Bang Rifle
The Model 1922 Bang rifle is a US semi-automatic rifle designed by the Danish arms designer Søren Hansen Bang. It was a modification of the earlier Models of 1909 and Model 1911 Bang rifles, both chambered in the .30-06 Springfield
.30-06 Springfield
round. It was gas operated, using a sliding muzzle cup system which was blown forward by the combustion gases while the bullet emerged from the barrel. During field trials in 1919 and 1927, the rifle was demonstrated by the designer.[1] Because of its mechanical complexity and its susceptibility to gas fouling of the sliding muzzle cup, it was unsuccessful in US government testing. The Bang System was also used in the Gewehr 41
Gewehr 41
and suffered the same shortcomings. The controversial French St
[...More...]

picture info

Hammer (firearm)
The hammer is a part of a firearm that is used to strike the percussion cap/primer, or a separate firing pin,[1] to ignite the propellant and fire the projectile. It is so called due to the fact that it resembles a hammer in both form and function. The hammer itself is a metal piece that forcefully rotates about a pivot point.[2]Contents1 Evolution 2 Drawbacks 3 See also 4 ReferencesEvolution[edit]Artistic rendition of firing a hand cannonFirearms, initially known as “hand cannons”,[3] first became a viable weapon in 1364 [3] through the advancement of chemical technologies to create a gunpowder efficient enough to launch a projectile at high velocities in a hand-held weapon. The issue quickly arose of how to effectively ignite the gunpowder while maintaining the weapon’s aim at the target. Initially, the problem was solved by using a “slow match”:[4] a chemically treated piece of rope that would stay lit for an extended period of time
[...More...]

picture info

M1911 Pistol
The M1911 is a single-action, semi-automatic, magazine-fed, recoil-operated pistol chambered for the .45 ACP
.45 ACP
cartridge.[1] It served as the standard-issue sidearm for the United States
United States
Armed Forces from 1911 to 1986. It was widely used in World War I, World War II, the Korean War, and the Vietnam
Vietnam
War. The pistol's formal designation as of 1940 was Automatic Pistol, Caliber .45, M1911 for the original model of 1911 or Automatic Pistol, Caliber .45, M1911A1 for the M1911A1, adopted in 1924. The designation changed to Pistol, Caliber .45, Automatic, M1911A1 in the Vietnam War
Vietnam War
era.[1] The U.S. procured around 2.7 million M1911 and M1911A1 pistols in military contracts during its service life. The M1911 was replaced by the 9mm
9mm
Beretta M9
Beretta M9
pistol as the standard U.S
[...More...]

.