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Gardens Of Babur
A garden is a planned space, usually outdoors, set aside for the display, cultivation and enjoyment of plants and other forms of nature. The garden can incorporate both natural and man-made materials. The most common form today is known as a residential garden, but the term garden has traditionally been a more general one. Zoos, which display wild animals in simulated natural habitats, were formerly called zoological gardens.[1][2] Western gardens are almost universally based on plants, with garden often signifying a shortened form of botanical garden. Some traditional types of eastern gardens, such as Zen gardens, use plants sparsely or not at all
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Garden (other)
A garden is an area set aside for the cultivation and enjoyment of plant and other natural life. Garden
Garden
may also refer to:Market gardening, small-scale production of fruits, vegetables and flowers as cash cropsContents1 Places1.1 United States2 Entertainment 3 Other uses 4 See alsoPlaces[edit]"The Garden", the name given to the school of Epicurus
Epicurus
in Athens Garden
Garden
Island (other), several Gardens, Cape Town Garden, Karachi, one of the neighbourhoods of Saddar Town in Karachi, Sindh, Pakistan Kent, the " Garden
Garden
of England" Victoria, an Australian state also known as the " Garden
Garden
State"United States[edit]Garden, Michigan Garden, Ohio Garden, Utah Garden
Garden
County, Nebraska Garden
Garden
Lake, a lake in Minnesota New Jersey, a U.S
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Perennial Plant
A perennial plant or simply perennial is a plant that lives more than two years.[1] The term (per- + -ennial, "through the years") is often used to differentiate a plant from shorter-lived annuals and biennials. The term is also widely used to distinguish plants with little or no woody growth from trees and shrubs, which are also technically perennials.[2] Perennials, especially small flowering plants, that grow and bloom over the spring and summer, die back every autumn and winter, and then return in the spring from their rootstock, are known as herbaceous perennials. However, depending on the rigors of local climate, a plant that is a perennial in its native habitat, or in a milder garden, may be treated by a gardener as an annual and planted out every year, from seed, from cuttings or from divisions
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Stuttgart
Stuttgart
Stuttgart
(/ˈʃtʊtɡɑːrt/ SHTUUT-gart;[4] German: [ˈʃtʊtɡaʁt] ( listen); Swabian: Schduagert, pronounced [ˈʒ̊d̥ua̯ɡ̊ɛʕd̥]; names in other languages) is the capital and largest city of the German state of Baden-Württemberg. Stuttgart is located on the Neckar
Neckar
river in a fertile valley known locally as the " Stuttgart
Stuttgart
Cauldron." It lies an hour from the Swabian Jura
Swabian Jura
and the Black Forest. Its urban area has a population of 609,219,[5] making it the sixth largest city in Germany.[6] 2.7 million people live in the city's administrative region[7] and another 5.3 million people in its metropolitan area,[8] making it the fourth largest metropolitan area in Germany
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Grad (Slavic Settlement)
A gord is a medieval Slavic fortified wooden settlement, sometimes known as a burgwall after the German term for such sites. Gords were built during the late Bronze and early Iron Ages by the Lusatian culture (c. 1300–500 BCE, and later in the 8th–7th centuries BCE, in what is now Poland, the Czech Republic, Hungary, Slovakia, eastern Germany, Romania/Moldova, Belarus
Belarus
and western Ukraine. These settlements were usually founded on strategic sites such as hills, riverbanks, lake islands, or peninsulas. Construction and evolution[edit] A typical gord was a group of wooden houses built either in rows or in circles, surrounded by one or more rings of walls made of earth and wood, a palisade, and/or moats. Some gords were ring-shaped, with a round, oval, or occasionally polygonal fence or wall surrounding a hollow. Others, built on a natural hill or a man-made mound, were cone-shaped
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British English
British English
British English
is the standard dialect of English language
English language
as spoken and written in the United Kingdom.[3] Variations exist in formal, written English in the United Kingdom. For example, the adjective wee is almost exclusively used in parts of Scotland
Scotland
and Ireland, and occasionally Yorkshire, whereas little is predominant elsewhere. Nevertheless, there is a meaningful degree of uniformity in written English within the United Kingdom, and this could be described by the term British English. The forms of spoken English, however, vary considerably more than in most other areas of the world where English is spoken,[4] so a uniform concept of British English
British English
is more difficult to apply to the spoken language
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Yard (land)
A yard is an area of land immediately adjacent to a building or a group of buildings. It may be either enclosed or open.[1] The word comes from the same linguistic root as the word garden and has many of the same meanings. A number of derived words exist, usually tied to a particular usage or building type. Some may be archaic or in lesser use now. Examples of such words are: courtyard, barnyard, hopyard, graveyard, churchyard, brickyard, prison yard, railyard, junkyard and stableyard.Contents1 Word origin 2 Application of the term 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksWord origin[edit] The word "yard" came from the Anglo-Saxon geard, compare "garden" (German Garten), Old Norse
Old Norse
garðr, Russian gorod = "town" (originally as an "enclosed fortified area"), Latin hortus = "garden" (hence horticulture and orchard), from Greek χορτος (chortos) = "farm-yard", "feeding-place", "fodder", (from which "hay" originally as grown in an enclosed field)
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American English
American English
American English
(AmE, AE, AmEng, USEng, en-US),[3] sometimes called United States
United States
English or U.S. English,[4][5] is the set of dialects of the English language
English language
native to the United States
United States
of America.[6] English is the most widely spoken language in the United States
United States
and is the common language used by the federal government, to the extent that all laws and compulsory education are practiced in English
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Landscape Architect
A landscape architect is a person who is educated in the field of landscape architecture. The practice of landscape architecture includes: site analysis, site inventory, land planning, planting design, grading, storm water management, sustainable design, construction specification and ensuring that all plans meet the current building codes and local and federal ordinances
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Horticultural
Horticulture
Horticulture
is the science and art of growing plants (fruits, vegetables, flowers, and any other cultivar). It also includes plant conservation, landscape restoration, soil management, landscape and garden design, construction, and maintenance, and arboriculture. In contrast to agriculture, horticulture does not include large-scale crop production or animal husbandry. Horticulturists apply their knowledge, skills, and technologies used to grow intensively produced plants for human food and non-food uses and for personal or social needs. Their work involves plant propagation and cultivation with the aim of improving plant growth, yields, quality, nutritional value, and resistance to insects, diseases, and environmental stresses. They work as gardeners, growers, therapists, designers, and technical advisors in the food and non-food sectors of horticulture
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Habit (biology)
Habit is equivalent to habitus in some applications in biology; the term refers variously to aspects of behaviour or structure, as follows:In zoology (particularly in ethology), habit usually refers to aspects of more or less predictable behaviour, instinctive or otherwise, though it also has broader application. Habitus refers to the characteristic form or morphology of a species. In botany habit is the characteristic form in which a given species of plant grows (see Glossary of plant morphology# Plant
Plant
habit).[1]Contents1 Behavior 2 Structure 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksBehavior[edit] In zoology, habit (not to be confused with habitus as described below) usually refers to a specific behavior pattern, either adopted, learned, pathological, innate, or directly related to physiology
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Annual Plant
An annual plant is a plant that completes its life cycle, from germination to the production of seeds, within one year, and then dies. Summer annuals germinate during spring or early summer and mature by autumn of the same year. Winter annuals germinate during the autumn and mature during the spring or summer of the following calendar year.[1] One seed-to-seed life cycle for an annual can occur in as little as a month in some species, though most last several months. Oilseed rapa can go from seed-to-seed in about five weeks under a bank of fluorescent lamps. This style of growing is often used in classrooms for education
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Sicily
Sicily
Sicily
(/ˈsɪsɪli/ SISS-i-lee; Italian: Sicilia [siˈtʃiːlja], Sicilian: Sicìlia) is the largest island in the Mediterranean Sea. It is an autonomous region of Italy, in Southern Italy
Italy
along with surrounding minor islands, officially referred to as Regione Siciliana. Sicily
Sicily
is located in the central Mediterranean Sea, south of the Italian Peninsula, from which it is separated by the narrow Strait of Messina. Its most prominent landmark is Mount Etna, the tallest active volcano in Europe,[4] and one of the most active in the world, currently 3,329 m (10,922 ft) high
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Nicosia Municipal Gardens
Nicosia
Nicosia
municipal gardens are the largest municipal gardens located in Nicosia, Cyprus
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Butchart Gardens
The Butchart Gardens
Butchart Gardens
is a group of floral display gardens in Brentwood Bay, British Columbia, Canada, located near Victoria on Vancouver Island. The gardens receive over a million visitors each year. The gardens have been designated a National Historic Site of Canada.[1]Contents1 History 2 Collections2.1 Birds 2.2 Statuary3 Entertainment 4 Gallery 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit]Entrance to the Butchart GardensRobert Pim Butchart (1856–1943) began manufacturing Portland cement in 1888 near his birthplace of Owen Sound, Ontario, Canada. He and his wife Jennie Butchart (1866–1950) came to the west coast of Canada because of rich limestone deposits necessary for cement production.The Italian GardenThe Ross FountainIn 1904, they established their home near his quarry on Tod Inlet at the base of the Saanich Peninsula on Vancouver Island
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Victoria, British Columbia
Nickname(s): "The Garden City"[1] [2]Motto(s): "Forever free"VictoriaLocation of Victoria in Canada Show map of CanadaVictoriaVictoria (British Columbia) Show map of British ColumbiaCoordinates: 48°25′43″N 123°21′56″W / 48.42861°N 123.36556°W / 48.42861; -123.36556Country  CanadaProvince  British ColumbiaRegional District CapitalHistoric colonies C. of Vancouver Island
Vancouver Island
(1848–66) C
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