HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1500] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

Garage Rock
GARAGE ROCK (sometimes called \'60S PUNK or GARAGE PUNK) is a raw and energetic style of rock and roll that flourished in the mid-1960s, most notably in the United States and Canada . The style is characterized by basic chord structures played on electric guitars and other instruments , sometimes distorted through a fuzzbox , as well as often unsophisticated and occasionally aggressive lyrics and delivery. The term "garage rock" derives from the perception that groups were often made up of young amateurs who rehearsed in the family garage, although many were professional. In the US and Canada, surf rock —and later the Beatles and other beat groups of the British Invasion —motivated thousands of young people to form bands between 1963 and 1968. Hundreds of acts produced regional hits, and some had national hits. Though largely associated with North America, counterparts were present elsewhere as part of the worldwide "beat boom" of the era. With the advent of psychedelia , a number of garage bands incorporated exotic elements into the genre's primitive stylistic framework, but after 1968, as more elaborate forms of rock music overtook the marketplace, garage rock records largely disappeared from national and regional charts, and the garage band movement faded
[...More...]

"Garage Rock" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Garage Band (other)
A GARAGE BAND is a musical group that has obtained little fame or fortune, and therefore is typically relegated, at least metaphorically, to rehearsing and recording, not in a rented studio or while being paid to perform on stage like more successful groups, but rather in someone's garage . It may also refer to: * A band that performs music in the garage rock genre. * GarageBand , audio production software published by Apple Inc. * GarageBand.com (2003–2010), a website that helped publicize emerging bands. * Garage Band (comics), a 2005 European graphic novel by Gipi * Grojband , a Canadian/American animated television series. This disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title GARAGE BAND. If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the intended article. Retrieved from "https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Garage_band_(other) additional terms may apply. By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy .® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc
[...More...]

"Garage Band (other)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Garage Punk (fusion Genre)
GARAGE PUNK is a rock music fusion genre combining punk rock and garage rock that took shape in the indie rock underground between the late 1980s and early 1990s. Bands drew heavily from stripped-down 1970s punk rock and Detroit proto-punk , and incorporated numerous other styles into their approach, such as power pop , 1960s girl groups and garage rock, hardcore punk , early blues and R"> The term "garage punk" is sometimes used interchangeably with "garage rock" or "garage revival ", and it dates as early as 1972, although "punk" was not solidified as a genre until 1976. After the 1980s, groups who were labelled as "garage punk" stood in contrast to the nascent retro garage revival scene, moving past a strictly mid-1960s influence. Associated bands from that period contributed to the development of stoner rock , a more psychedelic variation of the genre. CONTENTS * 1 Etymology and usage * 2 Development and characteristics * 2.1 1960s: Original garage bands * 2.2 1980s–2000s: Fusion with 1970s punk * 3 List of artists * 4 See also * 5 Notes * 6 References * 7 Bibliography ETYMOLOGY AND USAGEThe term "punk rock" was first used to describe the music of American garage bands of the mid 1960s, and was not solidified as a genre until 1976. When referring to 1960s groups, the term "garage punk" is usually deployed interchangeably with "garage rock"
[...More...]

"Garage Punk (fusion Genre)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Proto-punk
PROTO-PUNK (or "PROTOPUNK") is the rock music played by garage bands from the 1960s and early 1970s that presaged the punk rock movement. A retroactive label, the musicians involved were not originally associated with each other, coming from a variety of backgrounds and styles, but together they anticipated many of punk's musical and thematic attributes. CONTENTS * 1 Definition * 2 Origins and etymology * 3 List of artists * 4 References * 5 Bibliography * 6 Further reading DEFINITION For more details on this topic, see Punk ideologies . According to the Allmusic guide: Proto-punk was never a cohesive movement, nor was there a readily identifiable proto-punk sound that made its artists seem related at the time. What ties proto-punk together is a certain provocative sensibility that didn't fit the prevailing counterculture of the time ... It was consciously subversive and fully aware of its outsider status ... In terms of its lasting influence, much proto-punk was primitive and stripped-down, even when it wasn't aggressive, and its production was usually just as unpolished. It also frequently dealt with taboo subject matter, depicting society's grimy underbelly in great detail, and venting alienation that was more intense and personal than ever before
[...More...]

"Proto-punk" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Origins Of Punk Rock
PUNK ROCK (or simply "PUNK") is a rock music genre that developed in the early to mid-1970s in the United States, United Kingdom, and Australia. Rooted in 1960s garage rock and other forms of what is now known as "proto-punk " music, punk rock bands rejected perceived excesses of mainstream 1970s rock. Punk
Punk
bands typically produced short or fast-paced songs, with hard-edged melodies and singing styles, stripped-down instrumentation, and often political, anti-establishment lyrics. Punk
Punk
embraces a DIY ethic ; many bands self-produce recordings and distribute them through informal channels. The term "punk" was first used in relation to rock music by some American critics in the early 1970s, to describe garage bands and their devotees. By late 1976, bands such as the New York Dolls
New York Dolls
, Television , and the Ramones in New York City
New York City
, and the Sex Pistols , the Clash , and the Damned in London
London
were recognized as the vanguard of a new musical movement. The following year saw punk rock spreading around the world, and it became a major cultural phenomenon in the United Kingdom. For the most part, punk took root in local scenes that tended to reject association with the mainstream
[...More...]

"Origins Of Punk Rock" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Rock And Roll
ROCK AND ROLL (often written as ROCK "> Sign commemorating the role of Alan Freed and Cleveland , Ohio in the origins of rock and roll The term "rock and roll" now has at least two different meanings, both in common usage. The _ American Heritage Dictionary _ and the _ Merriam-Webster Dictionary _ both define rock and roll as synonymous with rock music . _ Encyclopædia Britannica _, on the other hand, regards it as the music that originated in the mid-1950s and later developed "into the more encompassing international style known as rock music". The phrase "rocking and rolling" originally described the movement of a ship on the ocean, but was used by the early twentieth century, both to describe the spiritual fervor of black church rituals and as a sexual analogy. Various gospel, blues and swing recordings used the phrase before it became used more frequently – but still intermittently – in the 1940s, on recordings and in reviews of what became known as "rhythm and blues" music aimed at a black audience. In 1934, the song "Rock and Roll" by the Boswell Sisters appeared in the film _ Transatlantic Merry-Go-Round _. In 1942, _Billboard _ magazine columnist Maurie Orodenker started to use the term "rock-and-roll" to describe upbeat recordings such as "Rock Me" by Sister Rosetta Tharpe
[...More...]

"Rock And Roll" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Blues
BLUES is a genre and musical form originated by African Americans in the Deep South of the United States around the end of the 19th century. The genre developed from roots in African musical traditions , African-American work songs , spirituals , and folk music . Blues incorporated spirituals , work songs , field hollers , shouts , chants , and rhymed simple narrative ballads . The blues form, ubiquitous in jazz , rhythm and blues and rock and roll , is characterized by the call-and-response pattern, the blues scale and specific chord progressions , of which the twelve-bar blues is the most common. Blue notes (or "worried notes"), usually thirds or fifths flattened in pitch , are also an essential part of the sound. Blues shuffles or walking bass reinforce the trance-like rhythm and form a repetitive effect known as the groove . Blues as a genre is also characterized by its lyrics, bass lines, and instrumentation. Early traditional blues verses consisted of a single line repeated four times. It was only in the first decades of the 20th century that the most common current structure became standard: the AAB pattern , consisting of a line sung over the four first bars, its repetition over the next four, and then a longer concluding line over the last bars. Early blues frequently took the form of a loose narrative, often relating the troubles experienced in African-American society
[...More...]

"Blues" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Rockabilly
ROCKABILLY is one of the earliest styles of rock and roll music, dating back to the early 1950s in the United States
United States
, especially the South . As a genre it blends the sound of Western musical styles such as country with that of rhythm and blues , leading to what is considered "classic" rock and roll. Some have also described it as a blend of bluegrass with rock and roll. The term "rockabilly" itself is a portmanteau of "rock" (from "rock 'n' roll") and "hillbilly ", the latter a reference to the country music (often called "hillbilly music" in the 1940s and 1950s) that contributed strongly to the style. Other important influences on rockabilly include western swing , boogie woogie , jump blues , and electric blues . Defining features of the rockabilly sound included strong rhythms, vocal twangs, and common use of the tape echo ; but progressive addition of different instruments and vocal harmonies led to its "dilution". Initially popularized by artists such as Johnny Cash , Bill Haley , Buddy Holly , Elvis Presley
Elvis Presley
, Carl Perkins , Bob Luman , and Jerry Lee Lewis , the influence and success of the style waned in the 1960s; nonetheless, during the late 1970s and early 1980s, rockabilly enjoyed a major revival. An interest in the genre endures even in the 21st century, often within a subculture
[...More...]

"Rockabilly" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Rhythm And Blues
RHYTHM AND BLUES, often abbreviated as R&B or RNB, is a genre of popular African-American music that originated in the 1940s. The term was originally used by record companies to describe recordings marketed predominantly to urban African Americans , at a time when "urbane, rocking, jazz based music with a heavy, insistent beat" was becoming more popular. In the commercial rhythm and blues music typical of the 1950s through the 1970s, the bands usually consisted of piano, one or two guitars, bass, drums, saxophone, and sometimes background vocalists. R&B lyrical themes often encapsulate the African-American experience of pain and the quest for freedom and joy. The lyrics in this genre of music focus heavily on the themes of triumphs and failures in terms of relationships, freedom, economics, aspirations, and sex. The term _rhythm and blues_ has undergone a number of shifts in meaning. In the early 1950s it was frequently applied to blues records. Starting in the mid-1950s, after this style of music contributed to the development of rock and roll , the term "R posters for The Who's residency at the Marquee Club in 1964 contained the slogan, "Maximum R&B". This tangent of RnB is now known as "British rhythm and blues ". By the 1970s, the term _rhythm and blues_ changed again and was used as a blanket term for soul and funk
[...More...]

"Rhythm And Blues" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Soul Music
SOUL MUSIC (often referred to simply as SOUL) is a popular music genre that originated in the United States in the late 1950s and early 1960s. It combines elements of African-American gospel music , rhythm and blues and jazz . Soul music
Soul music
became popular for dancing and listening in the United States, where record labels such as Motown
Motown
, Atlantic and Stax were influential during the Civil Rights Movement
Civil Rights Movement
. Soul also became popular around the world, directly influencing rock music and the music of Africa . According to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame
Rock and Roll Hall of Fame
, soul is "music that arose out of the black experience in America through the transmutation of gospel and rhythm & blues into a form of funky , secular testifying". Catchy rhythms, stressed by handclaps and extemporaneous body moves, are an important feature of soul music. Other characteristics are a call and response between the lead vocalist and the chorus and an especially tense vocal sound. The style also occasionally uses improvisational additions, twirls and auxiliary sounds. Soul music
Soul music
reflected the African-American identity and it stressed the importance of an African-American culture. The new-found African-American consciousness led to new styles of music, which boasted pride in being black
[...More...]

"Soul Music" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Surf Music
SURF MUSIC is a subgenre of rock music associated with surf culture , particularly as found in Southern California
Southern California
. It was especially popular from 1962 to 1964 in two major forms. The first is INSTRUMENTAL SURF, distinguished by reverb -drenched electric guitars played to evoke the sound of crashing waves, largely pioneered by Dick Dale and the Del-Tones. The second is VOCAL SURF, which took the original surf sound and added vocal harmonies backed by basic Chuck Berry rhythms, a movement led by the Beach Boys . Dick Dale
Dick Dale
developed the surf sound from instrumental rock , where he added Middle Eastern and Mexican influences , a spring reverb , and the rapid alternate picking characteristics. His regional hit "Let\'s Go Trippin\' " (1961) launched the surf music craze, inspiring many others to take up the approach. The genre reached national exposure when it was represented by vocal groups such as the Beach Boys, Jan and Dean
Jan and Dean
, and Bruce this was later known as HOT ROD ROCK
[...More...]

"Surf Music" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Instrumental Rock
INSTRUMENTAL ROCK is rock music that emphasizes musical instruments and features very little or no singing . Examples of instrumental rock can be found in practically every subgenre of rock, often from musicians who specialize in the style. Instrumental rock was most popular from the mid-1950s to mid-1960s, with artists such as Bill Doggett Combo , Jimmy Reed , Earl Bostic , The Fireballs , The Shadows , and The Ventures . Surf music had many instrumental songs. Many instrumental hits came from the R other jazz musicians who scored pop hits include Tab Smith and Arnett Cobb . Several rhythm and blues sax players had hit instrumental songs, including Big Jay McNeeley, Red Prysock , and Lee Allen , whose "Walking with Mr. Lee" was quite popular. There were several notable blues instrumental songs during the 1950s; Little Walter 's rollicking "Juke" was a major hit. Instrumental hit songs could emphasize electronic organ (the Tornados ' "Telstar ", Dave "Baby" Cortez 's "The Happy Organ", Johnny & the Hurricanes ' "Red River Rock"), or the saxophone (the Champs ' "Tequila", Bill Black\'s Combo 's "Don't Be Cruel", the Piltdown Men 's "McDonald's Cave"), but the guitar was most prominent
[...More...]

"Instrumental Rock" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Beat Music
BEAT MUSIC, BRITISH BEAT, or MERSEYBEAT (after bands from Liverpool and nearby areas beside the River Mersey ) is a pop and rock music genre that developed in the United Kingdom in the early 1960s. Beat music is a fusion of rock and roll (mainly Chuck Berry guitar style and the midtempo beat of artists like Buddy Holly ), doo-wop , skiffle and R&B . The genre provided many of the bands responsible for the British Invasion of the American pop charts starting in 1964, and provided the model for many important developments in pop and rock music, including the format of the rock group around lead , rhythm and bass guitars with drums . CONTENTS * 1 Use of the term * 2 Characteristics * 3 History * 4 British Invasion * 5 Decline and influence * 6 Notable artists * 6.1 Merseybeat * 6.2 Other British beat groups * 7 See also * 8 Notes * 9 References * 10 External links USE OF THE TERMThe exact origins of the terms 'beat music' and 'Merseybeat' are uncertain. Beat music seems to have had little to do with the Beat Generation literary movement of the 1950s, and more to do with driving rhythms , which the bands had adopted from their rock and roll, rhythm and blues and soul music influences
[...More...]

"Beat Music" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

United States
Coordinates : 40°N 100°W / 40°N 100°W / 40; -100 United States
United States
of America _ Flag Great Seal MOTTO: " In God We Trust " Other traditional mottos _ * " E pluribus unum " ( Latin
Latin
) (de facto) "Out of many, one" * " Annuit c
[...More...]

"United States" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Canada
Coordinates : 60°N 95°W / 60°N 95°W / 60; -95 CANADA _ Flag MOTTO: A Mari Usque Ad Mare _ (Latin ) (English: "From Sea to Sea") ANTHEM: " O Canada "------------------------- ROYAL ANTHEM : " God Save the Queen " CAPITAL Ottawa 45°24′N 75°40′W / 45.400°N 75.667°W / 45.400; -75.667 LARGEST CITY Toronto OFFICIAL LANGUAGES * English * French ETHNIC GROUPS Ethnic demography * 76.7% White * 14.2% Asian * 4.3% Indigenous * 2.9% Black * 1.2% Latin American * 0.5% Multiracial * 0.3% Other RELIGION List of religion
[...More...]

"Canada" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Electric Guitar
An ELECTRIC GUITAR is a fretted stringed instrument with a neck and body that uses a pickup to convert the vibration of its strings into electrical signals. The vibration occurs when a guitarist strums , plucks or fingerpicks the strings. It is sensed by a pickup , most commonly by a magnetic pickup that uses the principle of direct electromagnetic induction . The signal generated by an electric guitar is too weak to drive a loudspeaker , so it is plugged into a guitar amplifier before being sent to a loudspeaker, which makes a sound loud enough to hear. The output of an electric guitar is an electric signal, and the signal can easily be altered by electronic circuits to add "color" to the sound or change the sound. Often the signal is modified using effects such as reverb and distortion and "overdrive" , with the growling sound of the latter being a key element of the sound of the electric guitar as it is used in blues and rock music . Invented in 1931, the amplified electric guitar was adopted by jazz guitarists , who sought to be able to do single-note guitar solos in large big band ensembles. Early proponents of the electric guitar on record included Les Paul , Lonnie Johnson , Sister Rosetta Tharpe , T-Bone Walker , and Charlie Christian
[...More...]

"Electric Guitar" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.