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Gaels
The Gaels
Gaels
(Irish pronunciation: [ɡeːlˠ], Scottish Gaelic pronunciation: [kɛː.əlˠ]; Irish: Na Gaeil, Scottish Gaelic: Na Gàidheil, Manx: Ny Gaeil) are an ethnolinguistic group native to northwestern Europe.[a] They are associated with the Gaelic languages: a branch of the Celtic languages
Celtic languages
comprising Irish, Manx and Scottish Gaelic. Historically, the ethnonyms Irish and Scots referred to the Gaels
Gaels
in general, but the scope of those nationalities is today more complex. Gaelic language
Gaelic language
and culture originated in Ireland, extending to Dál Riata in western Scotland. In antiquity the Gaels
Gaels
traded with the Roman Empire
Roman Empire
and also raided Roman Britain. In the Middle Ages, Gaelic culture became dominant throughout the rest of Scotland
Scotland
and the Isle of Man
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Clan
A clan is a group of people united by actual or perceived kinship[1] and descent. Even if lineage details are unknown, clan members may be organized around a founding member or apical ancestor. Clans in indigenous societies tend to be exogamous, meaning that their members cannot marry one another. Clans preceded more centralized forms of community organization and government and are in every country. Members may identify with a coat of arms or other symbol to show they are an independent clan. The kinship-based bonds may be symbolic, whereby the clan shares a "stipulated" common ancestor that is a symbol of the clan's unity. When this "ancestor" is non-human, it is referred to as a totem, which is frequently an animal. The word clan is derived from the Gaelic clann[1] meaning "children" or "progeny"; it is not from the word for "family" in either Irish[2][3] or Scottish Gaelic
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English Language
English is a West Germanic language
West Germanic language
that was first spoken in early medieval England
England
and is now a global lingua franca.[4][5] Named after the Angles, one of the Germanic tribes that migrated to England, it ultimately derives its name from the Anglia (Angeln) peninsula in the Baltic Sea. It is closely related to the Frisian languages, but its vocabulary has been significantly influenced by other Germanic languages, particularly Norse (a North Germanic
North Germanic
language), as well as by Latin
Latin
and Romance languages, especially French.[6] English has developed over the course of more than 1,400 years. The earliest forms of English, a set of Anglo-Frisian dialects brought to Great Britain by Anglo-Saxon settlers in the 5th century, are called Old English
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High King Of Ireland
The High Kings of Ireland
Ireland
(Irish: Ard- na hÉireann Irish pronunciation: [ˈa:ɾˠd̪ˠˌɾˠiː n̪ˠə ˈheːrʲən̪ˠ]) were sometimes historical and sometimes legendary figures who had, or who are claimed to have had, lordship over the whole of Ireland. Medieval and early modern Irish literature portrays an almost unbroken sequence of High Kings, ruling from the Hill of Tara
Hill of Tara
over a hierarchy of lesser kings, stretching back thousands of years
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Davidian Revolution
The Davidian Revolution
Davidian Revolution
is a term given by many scholars to the changes which took place in the Kingdom of Scotland
Kingdom of Scotland
during the reign of David I (1124–1153)
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Northwestern Europe
Northwestern Europe, or Northwest Europe, is a loosely defined region of Europe, overlapping northern and western Europe
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Ethnolinguistic Group
An ethnolinguistic group (or ethno-linguistic group) is a group that is unified by both a common ethnicity and language. Most ethnic groups have their own language.[1][2] Despite this, the term is often used to emphasise when language is a major basis for the ethnic group, especially with regards to its neighbours.[1] A central concept in the linguistic study of ethnolinguistic groups is ethnolinguistic vitality, the ability of the group's language and ethnicity to sustain.[3] An ethnolinguistic group that lacks such vitality is unlikely to survive as a distinct entity
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James VI And I
James VI and I
James VI and I
(James Charles Stuart; 19 June 1566 – 27 March 1625) was King of Scotland
King of Scotland
as James VI from 24 July 1567 and King of England and Ireland as James I from the union of the Scottish and English crowns on 24 March 1603 until his death in 1625. The kingdoms of Scotland and England were individual sovereign states, with their own parliaments, judiciaries, and laws, though both were ruled by James in personal union. James was the son of Mary, Queen of Scots, and a great-great-grandson of Henry VII, King of England
King of England
and Lord of Ireland, positioning him to eventually accede to all three thrones. James succeeded to the Scottish throne at the age of thirteen months, after his mother was compelled to abdicate in his favour
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Irreligion
Irreligion (adjective form: non-religious or irreligious) is the absence, indifference, rejection of, or hostility towards religion.[1] Irreligion may include some forms of theism, depending on the religious context it is defined against; for example, in 18th-century Europe, the epitome of irreligion was deism,[2] while in contemporary East Asia
East Asia
the shared term meaning "irreligion" or "no religion" (無宗教, Chinese pron. wú zōngjiào, Japanese pron
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End Of Roman Rule In Britain
The end of Roman rule in Britain was the transition from Roman Britain to post-Roman Britain. Roman rule ended in different parts of Britain at different times, and under different circumstances. In 383, the usurper Magnus Maximus
Magnus Maximus
withdrew troops from northern and western Britain, probably leaving local warlords in charge. Around 410, the Romano-British expelled the magistrates of the usurper Constantine III, ostensibly in response to his failures to use the Roman garrison he had stripped from Britain to protect the island. Roman Emperor Honorius replied to a request for assistance with the Rescript
Rescript
of Honorius, telling the Roman cities to see to their own defence, a tacit acceptance of temporary British self-government. Honorius was fighting a large-scale war in Italy
Italy
against the Visigoths under their leader Alaric, with Rome
Rome
itself under siege
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Scots Language
In the 2011 census, respondents indicated that 1.54 million (30%) are able to speak Scots.[3] Language
Language
familyIndo-EuropeanGermanicWest GermanicIngvaeonicAnglo-FrisianAnglicScotsEarly formsOld EnglishMiddle EnglishEarly ScotsMiddle ScotsDialectsCentral Southern Ulster Northern InsularWriting systemLatinOfficial statusOfficial language inNoneClassified as a "traditional language" by the Scottish Government. Classified as a "regional or minority language" under the European Charter for Regional or
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Christianity
Christianity[note 1] is an Abrahamic monotheistic[1] religion based on the life, teachings, and miracles of Jesus
Jesus
of Nazareth, known by Christians
Christians
as the Christ, or "Messiah", who is the focal point of the Christian
Christian
faiths
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Hiberno-Roman Relations
Hiberno-Roman relations
Hiberno-Roman relations
refers to the relationships (mainly commercial and cultural) which existed between Ireland
Ireland
(Hibernia) and the ancient Roman Empire, which lasted from the time of Julius Caesar
Julius Caesar
to the beginning of the 5th century AD in Western Europe
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United States
Coordinates: 40°N 100°W / 40°N 100°W / 40; -100 United States
United States
of AmericaFlagGreat SealMotto:  "In God
God
We Trust"[1][fn 1]Other traditional mottos  "E pluribus unum" (Latin) (de facto) "Out of many, one" "Annuit cœptis" (Latin) "H
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Australasia
Australasia, a region of Oceania, comprises Australia, New Zealand, neighbouring islands in the Pacific Ocean
Pacific Ocean
and, sometimes, the island of New Guinea
New Guinea
(which is usually considered to be part of Melanesia). Charles de Brosses
Charles de Brosses
coined the term (as French Australasie) in Histoire des navigations aux terres australes[1] (1756)
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Fiannaíocht
The Fenian Cycle (/ˈfiːniən/) or the Fiannaíocht (Irish: an Fhiannaíocht[1] ), also referred to as the Ossianic Cycle /ˌɒʃiˈænɪk/ after its narrator Oisín, is a body of prose and verse centring on the exploits of the mythical hero Fionn mac Cumhaill (Old, Middle, Modern Irish: Find, Finn, Fionn) and his warriors the Fianna. These stories tell of tests accomplished by Finn and the Fianna. It is one of the four major cycles of Irish mythology along with the Mythological Cycle, the Ulster Cycle, and the Historical Cycle. Put in chronological order, the Fenian cycle is the third cycle, between the Ulster and Historical cycles
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