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Gadadhar Singha
Gadadhar Singha
Gadadhar Singha
or Supaatpha (Assamese: স্বৰ্গদেউ গদাধৰ সিংহ, reign 1681–1696[1]) established the rule of the Tungkhungia clan of the Ahom kings that ruled the Ahom kingdom till its climactic end. He was the son of Gobar Roja, a descendant of Suhungmung, and who had become the king for a mere 20 days. Previously known as Gadapani, Gadadhar Singha
Gadadhar Singha
was able to stabilize the kingdom after the decade long turmoil following the Ahom victory in the Battle of Saraighat. This period saw the ruthless power grab of Debera Borbarua and Laluksola Borphukan's abandonment of Guwahati
Guwahati
and oppression via Sulikphaa
Sulikphaa
Lora Roja. Gadadhar Singha retook Guwahati
Guwahati
from the Mughals for good, and established a strong rule of 'blood and iron'
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Itakhuli
Itakhuli or Sukreswar Hill is a small hill on the south bank of the Brahmaputra
Brahmaputra
at Guwahati. The past official residence of the Deputy Commissioner of Kamrup District of Assam
Assam
was located on top of this hill. The D.C. bungalow was vacated for the Brahmaputra
Brahmaputra
river side development. Adjacent to it in the western side of the D.C.'s bungalow is the Sukreswar Temple. Itakhuli hill have always have been of strategic importance it was the seat of the viceroys and a garrison since the early days of Kamrup from Ahom, to Mughal and to the British
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Sukaphaa
Chaolung Sukaphaa
Sukaphaa
(r. 1228–1268), also Siu-Ka-Pha, the first Ahom king in medieval Assam, was the founder of the Ahom kingdom. A Tai prince originally from Mong Mao, (which is now included within the Dehong-Dai Singhpho Autonomous Prefecture of Yunnan
Yunnan
in Peoples Republic of China), the kingdom he established in 1228 existed for nearly six hundred years and in the process unified the various tribal and non-tribal peoples of the region that left a deep impact on the region
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Garhgaon
Gargaon (Pron:/gɑ:ˈgɑ̃ʊ/) was the capital of the Ahom kingdom
Ahom kingdom
for many years. It was built by the Ahom king Suklenmung (Gargoyaan Rojaa) in 1540. It lies 13 km east of present-day Sivasagar
Sivasagar
town.[1] The palace structures were made of wood and stones. In 1747 Pramatta Singha, son of Rudra Singha, constructed the brick wall of about 5 km in length surrounding the Gargaon Palace and the masonry gate leading to it. The old palace was destroyed and the present seven-storied palace was rebuilt around 1752 by Rajeswar Singha
Rajeswar Singha
(Suremphaa, 1751–1769).Contents1 Description1.1 Solang ghar 1.2 The palace ground2 Photo gallery 3 See also 4 ReferencesDescription[edit] During the expedition of Mir Jumla in 1662, he was accompanied by a writer named Shihabuddin who wrote a detailed account of the expedition and gave a very full description of the people and the country
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Assamese Language
Assamese (/ˌæsəˈmiːz/)[7], (Assamese pronunciation: [ɔxɔmia]), (also Asamiya)[8][9][10] is an Eastern Indo-Aryan language spoken mainly in the Indian state of Assam, where it is an official language. It is the easternmost Indo-European language, spoken by over 15 million speakers,[11] and serves as a lingua franca in the region.[12] Nefamese is an Assamese-based pidgin used in Arunachal Pradesh
Arunachal Pradesh
and Nagamese, an Assamese-based Creole language
Creole language
is widely used in Nagaland
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Atan Burhagohain
Atan Burhagohain (Assamese: আতন বৰগোহাঁই ) was one of the most influential Burhagohains in the nearly 600 years of the Ahom kingdom. Atan Burhagohain Rajmantri Dangaria was the Prime Minister of Assam for more than seventeen years, from January 1662 to March 1679. During this period Assam passed through a series of crises in the form of foreign invasions and internal disruptions; and Atan Burhagohain conducted the affairs with rare foresight, probity, judgment, and patriotism. The versatile qualities of the Burhagoain, and the proof that he gave of his lofty and noble ideals, made him the darling of the people. Kings, potentates and the populace were united in showering tokens of their admiration and respect on this man of their country's destiny
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Laluksola Borphukan
Laluksola Borphukan (fl. 1672–1680) was a Borphukan of the Ahom kingdom, who abandoned Guwahati
Guwahati
after the Ahom win at Battle of Saraighat, and aspired to be a king
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Sutuphaa
Sutuphaa
Sutuphaa
was the king of Ahom kingdom
Ahom kingdom
from 1369 CE to 1376 CE after an interregnum, though historians differ regarding his year of accession, as some of them claim his year of accession was 1364. His reign was marked by conflicts with Chutiya Kingdom, which later resulted in his treacherous murder, by Chutiyas.Contents1 Ancestry and accession 2 Reign and assassination 3 Interregnum 4 Notes 5 ReferencesAncestry and accession[edit] Sutuphaa
Sutuphaa
was the second son of Ahom king Sukhaangphaa. After the death of his father, his elder brother Sukhrangpha
Sukhrangpha
ascended the throne. After a reign of thirty-two years, Sukhrangpha
Sukhrangpha
died in 1364 CE. Historians differ from this point
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Suhung
Suhung
Suhung
(reign 1674–1675 CE) was a king of Ahom kingdom
Ahom kingdom
who ruled for a very short period. While most of the chronicles put the number of days of his reign as 20, in some chronicles the duration of his reign was shown as one month and fifteen days.[1] Suhung
Suhung
was installed as king of Ahom kingdom
Ahom kingdom
by Debera Borbarua after the latter poisoned Ahom king Ramdhwaj Singha. His reign was characterized by the atrocities committed by his minister Debera Borbarua
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Battle Of Saraighat
The Battle of Saraighat
Saraighat
was fought in 1671 between the Mughal empire (led by the Kachwaha
Kachwaha
king, Raja Ramsingh I), and the Ahom Kingdom
Ahom Kingdom
(led by Lachit Borphukan) on the Brahmaputra river
Brahmaputra river
at Saraighat, now in Guwahati, Assam, India.[1] Although much weaker, the Ahom Army defeated the Mughal Army
Mughal Army
by brilliant uses of the terrain, clever diplomatic negotiations to buy time, guerrilla tactics, psychological warfare, military intelligence and by exploiting the sole weakness of the Mughal forces—its navy. The Battle of Saraighat
Saraighat
was the last battle in the last major attempt by the Mughals to extend their empire into Assam
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Suteuphaa
Suteuphaa
Suteuphaa
was the second king of Ahom kingdom
Ahom kingdom
who ruled from 1268 CE to 1281 CE. Suteuphaa
Suteuphaa
succeeded his father Sukaphaa, who laid the foundation of Ahom kingdom
Ahom kingdom
in Assam. His reign was characterized by the expansion of his father’s kingdom. He also had conflicts with the Shans or Naras of Mungkang, a Shan kingdom in Upper Burma.Contents1 Ancestry and accession 2 Reign2.1 Expansion of the kingdom 2.2 Conflict with Mungkang3 Death and legacy 4 See also 5 Notes 6 ReferencesAncestry and accession[edit] Suteuphaa
Suteuphaa
was the eldest son of Ahom king Sukaphaa. After a reign of 39 years, Sukaphaa
Sukaphaa
died in 1268 CE
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Subinphaa
Subinphaa
Subinphaa
(1281–1293) was the third king of the Ahom kingdom. During Subinphaa's rule, the Ahoms divided themselves into the rulers and the ruled with the formal delineation of the Ahom nobility (Satgharia Ahoms) and the rest of the Ahoms identifying themselves with the rest of the population.[1] Literally the Ahom of the Seven Houses, the nobility consisted of three state clans called Gohain (the royal, Burhagohain and Borgohain) and four priestly clans called Gogoi (Deodhai, Bailung, Mohan and Siring).[2] Notes[edit]^ (Baruah 1993, p. 16) ^ (Baruah 1993, p. 44ff)References[edit]Baruah, S. L
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Purandar Singha
Purandar Singha
Purandar Singha
(1818–19, 1833–1838) was the last king of Ahom kingdom in Assam. He was installed as king twice. First time, he was installed by Ruchinath Burhagohain in 1818 CE, after the latter deposed Chandrakanta Singha
Chandrakanta Singha
from the throne. His first reign ended in 1819 CE, during the second Burmese invasion of Assam, when his forces were defeated and the Burmese reinstalled Chandrakanta Singha
Chandrakanta Singha
on the throne. He along with Ruchinath Burhagohain continued their efforts to expel Burmese invaders, by seeking help from British and through armed struggle. After First Anglo-Burmese War, the British East India Company occupied Assam
Assam
from Bumese invaders
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Sudingphaa
Sudingphaa
Sudingphaa
(or Chandrakanta Singha) (Assamese: স্বৰ্গদেউ চন্দ্ৰকান্ত সিংহ) (1811–1818, 1819–1821) was a Tungkhungia king of the Ahom dynasty, who ruled at the climactic of the Ahom kingdom. His reign witnessed the invasion of Burmese on Assam
Assam
and its subsequent occupation by British East India Company. He was installed as King twice. His first reign ended when Ruchinath Burhagohain deposed him and installed Purandar Singha
Purandar Singha
in his stead. His second reign ended with his defeat at the hands of the invading Burmese army. He continued his militant efforts to regain his kingdom as well as to keep Purandar Singha
Purandar Singha
at bay. Finally he submitted himself to Burmese who induced him to believe that they will make him king. Instead he was seized and placed in confinement at Rangpur
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Suklingphaa
Suklingphaa
Suklingphaa
(1795–1811), or Kamaleswar Singha (Assamese: স্বৰ্গদেউ কমলেশ্বৰ সিংহ), was a king of the Ahom kingdom. His reign witnessed the suppression of Moamoria rebellion and restoration of Ahom rule over Upper Assam. The Dundiya Revolution in Kamrup was also suppressed during his reign. In Nagaon, the Ahom army also managed to defeat a coalition of Moamoria rebels and the Kacharis of Kachari Kingdom. Since the monarch was very young, the administration of the kingdom was run by Purnananda Burhagohain, the Prime Minister of Ahom Kingdom, who was an able administrator and general
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Suhitpangphaa
Suhitpangphaa
Suhitpangphaa
(1780–1795), also Gaurinath Singha (Assamese: স্বৰ্গদেউ গৌৰীনাথ সিংহ), was an Ahom king of the Ahom kingdom. He lost his capital Rangpur to the Moamoria rebellion and camped in the Nagaon and Guwahati region till Captain Welsh removed the rebels
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