HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff

GHS Hazard Statement
Hazard statements form part of the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS). They are intended to form a set of standardized phrases about the hazards of chemical substances and mixtures that can be translated into different languages.[1][2] As such, they serve the same purpose as the well-known R-phrases, which they are intended to replace. Hazard statements are one of the key elements for the labelling of containers under the GHS, along with:[3]an identification of the product one or more hazard pictograms (where necessary) a signal word – either Danger or Warning – where necessary precautionary statements, indicating how the product should be handled to minimize risks to the user (as well as to other people and the general environment) the identity of the supplier (who might be a manufacturer or importer).Each hazard statement is designated a code, starting with the letter H and followed by three digits
[...More...]

List Of R-phrases
R-phrases (short for Risk Phrases) are defined in Annex III of European Union
European Union
Directive 67/548/EEC: Nature of special risks attributed to dangerous substances and preparations
[...More...]

picture info

Safety Data Sheet
A safety data sheet (SDS),[1] material safety data sheet (MSDS), or product safety data sheet (PSDS) is an important component of product stewardship, occupational safety and health, and spill-handling procedures. SDS formats can vary from source to source within a country depending on national requirements. SDSs are a widely used system for cataloging information on chemicals, chemical compounds, and chemical mixtures. SDS information may include instructions for the safe use and potential hazards associated with a particular material or product. The SDS should be available for reference in the area where the chemicals are being stored or in use. There is also a duty to properly label substances on the basis of physico-chemical, health or environmental risk
[...More...]

picture info

European Union
The European Union
European Union
(EU) is a political and economic union of 28 member states that are located primarily in Europe.[12] It has an area of 4,475,757 km2 (1,728,099 sq mi) and an estimated population of about 513 million. The EU has developed an internal single market through a standardised system of laws that apply in all member states in those matters, and only those matters, where members have agreed to act as one
[...More...]

CLP Regulation
The CLP Regulation[1] (for "Classification, Labelling and Packaging"[2]) is a European Union regulation
European Union regulation
from 2008, which aligns the European Union
European Union
system of classification, labelling and packaging of chemical substances and mixtures to the Globally Harmonised System (GHS). It is expected to facilitate global trade and the harmonised communication of hazard information of chemicals and to promote regulatory efficiency
[...More...]

Dangerous Substances Directive (67/548/EEC)
The Dangerous Substances Directive[1] (as amended) was one of the main European Union
European Union
laws concerning chemical safety, until its full replacement by the new regulation CLP regulation (2008), starting in 2016. It was made under Article 100 (Art. 94 in a consolidated version)[2] of the Treaty of Rome
[...More...]

picture info

Australia
Coordinates: 25°S 133°E / 25°S 133°E / -25; 133Commonwealth of Australia Flag Coat of arms Anthem: Advance Australia
Australia
Fair[N 1] Commonwealth of Australia, including the Australian territorial claim in the AntarcticCapitalCanberra35°18′29″S 149°07′28″E / 35.30806°S 149.12444°E / -35.30806; 149.12444Largest citySydneyNational languageEnglish[N 2]Religion (2016)[3] Various 52%
[...More...]

picture info

Hazardous Substances And New Organisms Act 1996
Hazardous Substances and New Organisms (Genetically Modified Organisms) Amendment Act 2002 Hazardous Substances and New Organisms (Approvals and Enforcement) Amendment Act 2005 Hazardous Substances and New Organisms Amendment Act 2010Status: Current legislationThe Hazardous Substances and New Organisms Act (HSNO) is an Act of Parliament passed in New Zealand
New Zealand
in 1996. The New Zealand Environmental Protection Authority (EPA) administers the Act. External links[edit]Text of the Act Hazardous Substances and New Organisms at the Ministry of Environment Environmental Protection Authority (EPA New Zealand)Dangerous goods portal New Zealand
New Zealand
portal Law portalThis article relating to law in New Zealand
New Zealand
is a stub. You can help by expanding it.v t eThis legislation article is a stub
[...More...]

picture info

United Nations
The United Nations
United Nations
(UN) is an intergovernmental organization tasked with maintaining international peace and security, developing friendly relations among nations, achieving international co-operation, and being a centre for harmonizing the actions of nations.[3] It was established after World War II, with the aim of preventing future wars, and succeeded the ineffective League of Nations.[4] Its headquarters, which are subject to extraterritoriality, are in Manhattan, New York City, and it has other main offices in Geneva, Nairobi, Vienna
Vienna
and The Hague. The organization is financed by assessed and voluntary contributions from its member states
[...More...]

picture info

International Standard Book Number
The International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a numeric commercial book identifier which is intended to be unique.[a][b] Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each separate edition and variation (except reprintings) of a publication. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book will each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is ten digits long if assigned before 2007, and thirteen digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007. The method of assigning an ISBN is nation-specific and varies between countries, often depending on how large the publishing industry is within a country. The initial ISBN identification format was devised in 1967, based upon the 9-digit Standard Book
Book
Numbering (SBN) created in 1966
[...More...]

picture info

Special
Special
Special
or the specials or variation, may refer to:.mw-parser-output .tocright float:right;clear:right;width:auto;background:none;padding:.5em 0 .8em 1.4em;margin-bottom:.5em .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-left clear:left .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-both clear:both .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-none clear:none Contents1 Policing 2 Literature 3 Film and television 4 Music4.1 Albums 4.2 Songs5 Computing 6 Other uses 7 See alsoPolicing[edit] Specials, Ulster
[...More...]

picture info

Official Journal Of The European Communities
Council of the EU PresidencyConfigurationsGeneral Foreign Justice and Home EconomicEuroLegislative procedure Voting SecretariatSecretary-GeneralUwe CorsepiusDirectorates-general COREPERJudiciaryCourt of JusticeMembers RulingsGeneral CourtCentral BankPresident DraghiESCB Euro EMU EurozoneCourt of AuditorsBudget OLAFOther bodiesAgencies Investment Bank CoR EESC Ombudsman National parliamentsPolicies and issuesForeign relationsHigh RepresentativeFederica MogheriniExt
[...More...]

picture info

GHS Hazard Pictograms
Hazard pictograms form part of the international Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS). Two sets of pictograms are included within the GHS: one for the labelling of containers and for workplace hazard warnings, and a second for use during the transport of dangerous goods. Either one or the other is chosen, depending on the target audience, but the two are not used together.[1] The two sets of pictograms use the same symbols for the same hazards, although certain symbols are not required for transport pictograms
[...More...]

GHS Precautionary Statements
Precautionary statements form part of the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS). They are intended to form a set of standardized phrases giving advice about the correct handling of chemical substances and mixtures, which can be translated into different languages.[1][2] As such, they serve the same purpose as the well-known S-phrases, which they are intended to replace. Precautionary statements are one of the key elements for the labelling of containers under the GHS, along with:[3]an identification of the product; one or more hazard pictograms (where necessary) a signal word – either Danger or Warning – where necessary hazard statements, indicating the nature and degree of the risks posed by the product the identity of the supplier (who might be a manufacturer or importer)Each precautionary statement is designated a code, starting with the letter P and followed by three digits
[...More...]

picture info

Globally Harmonized System Of Classification And Labelling Of Chemicals
The Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS) is an internationally agreed-upon standard managed by the United Nations
United Nations
that was set up to replace the assortment of hazardous material classification and labelling schemes previously used around the world. Core elements of the GHS include standardized hazard testing criteria, universal warning pictograms, and harmonized safety data sheets which provide users of dangerous goods with a host of information. The system acts as a complement to the UN Numbered system of regulated hazmat transport. Implementation is managed through the UN Secretariat
[...More...]

GHS Hazard Statements
Hazard statements form part of the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS). They are intended to form a set of standardized phrases about the hazards of chemical substances and mixtures that can be translated into different languages.[1][2] As such, they serve the same purpose as the well-known R-phrases, which they are intended to replace. Hazard statements are one of the key elements for the labelling of containers under the GHS, along with:[3]an identification of the product one or more hazard pictograms (where necessary) a signal word – either Danger or Warning – where necessary precautionary statements, indicating how the product should be handled to minimize risks to the user (as well as to other people and the general environment) the identity of the supplier (who might be a manufacturer or importer).Each hazard statement is designated a code, starting with the letter H and followed by three digits
[...More...]

.