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G. K. Chesterton
Gilbert Keith Chesterton, KC*SG (29 May 1874 – 14 June 1936), better known as G. K. Chesterton, was an English writer,[2] poet, philosopher, dramatist, journalist, orator, lay theologian, biographer, and literary and art critic. Chesterton is often referred to as the "prince of paradox".[3] Time magazine has observed of his writing style: "Whenever possible Chesterton made his points with popular sayings, proverbs, allegories—first carefully turning them inside out."[4] Chesterton is well known for his fictional priest-detective Father Brown,[5] and for his reasoned apologetics. Even some of those who disagree with him have recognised the wide appeal of such works as Orthodoxy
Orthodoxy
and The Everlasting Man.[4][6] Chesterton routinely referred to himself as an "orthodox" Christian, and came to identify this position more and more with Catholicism, eventually converting to Catholicism from High Church Anglicanism
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Kensington
Kensington
Kensington
is a district within the Royal Borough of Kensington
Kensington
and Chelsea in West London. The north east is taken up by Kensington Gardens, once private, but today a public park with Italian and Dutch gardens, public buildings such as the Albert Memorial, the Serpentine Gallery and Speke's monument. The district's commercial heart is Kensington
Kensington
High Street. The affluent and densely populated area contains the major museum district of South Kensington, which is home to Imperial College London, the Royal College of Music
Royal College of Music
and the Royal Albert Hall. The area is also home to many of London's European embassies
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Occult
The occult (from the Latin
Latin
word occultus "clandestine, hidden, secret") is "knowledge of the hidden".[1] In common English usage, occult refers to "knowledge of the paranormal", as opposed to "knowledge of the measurable",[2] usually referred to as science
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Anglo-Catholicism
The terms Anglo-Catholicism, Anglican Catholicism, and Catholic Anglicanism
Anglicanism
refer to people, beliefs and practices within Anglicanism that emphasise the Catholic
Catholic

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Matthew Arnold
Matthew Arnold
Matthew Arnold
(24 December 1822 – 15 April 1888) was an English poet and cultural critic who worked as an inspector of schools. He was the son of Thomas Arnold, the famed headmaster of Rugby School, and brother to both Tom Arnold, literary professor, and William Delafield Arnold, novelist and colonial administrator. Matthew Arnold
Matthew Arnold
has been characterised as a sage writer, a type of writer who chastises and instructs the reader on contemporary social issues.[1]Contents1 Early years 2 Marriage and a career 3 Literary career 4 Death 5 Arnold's character 6 Poetry 7 Prose7.1 Literary criticism 7.2 Social criticism 7.3 Journalistic criticism 7.4 Religious criticism8 Reputation 9 See also 10 Notes 11 Sources 12 External linksEarly years[edit] The Reverend John Keble, who would become one of the leaders of the Oxford Movement, stood as godfather to Matthew
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Thomas Carlyle
Thomas Carlyle
Thomas Carlyle
(4 December 1795 – 5 February 1881) was a Scottish philosopher, satirical writer, essayist, translator, historian, mathematician, and teacher.[1] Considered one of the most important social commentators of his time, he presented many lectures during his lifetime with certain acclaim in the Victorian era. One of those conferences resulted in his famous work On Heroes, Hero-Worship, and The Heroic in History where he explains that the key role in history lies in the actions of the "Great Man", claiming that "the history of the world is but the biography of great men".[2] A respected historian, his 1837 book The French Revolution: A History was the inspiration for Charles Dickens' 1859 novel A Tale of Two Cities, and remains popular today
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Campden Hill
Campden Hill
Campden Hill
is an area of high ground in west London
London
between Notting Hill, Kensington
Kensington
and Holland Park. The name derives from the former Campden House, built for Baptist Hicks, 1st Viscount Campden
Baptist Hicks, 1st Viscount Campden
who also owned Campden House in the Gloucestershire town of Campden.[1] The area is characterised by large Victorian houses which are part of the Phillimore estate.[2] Aubrey House
Aubrey House
is situated on Campden Hill. The street called Campden Hill
Campden Hill
runs from Campden Hill Road
Campden Hill Road
to Holland Park. It was built on part of the grounds of the former Bute House. Bute House was built c.1812, and was named after the second Marquess of Bute who lived there from 1830 until 1842
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Church Of England
The Church of England
England
(C of E) is the state church of England.[3][4][5] The Archbishop of Canterbury
Archbishop of Canterbury
(currently Justin Welby) is the most senior cleric, although the monarch is the supreme governor. The Church of England
England
is also the mother church of the international Anglican
Anglican
Communion
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Christian Unitarianism
Unitarianism (from Latin unitas "unity, oneness", from unus "one") is historically a Christian theological movement named for its belief that the God in Christianity is one entity, as opposed to the Trinity (tri- from Latin tres "three") which defines God as three persons in one being; the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.[1] Unitarian Christians, therefore, believe that Jesus was inspired by God in his moral teachings, and he is a savior,[2][3] but he was a normal human being and not a deity or God incarnate
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T. Fisher Unwin
T. Fisher Unwin
T. Fisher Unwin
was the London publishing house founded by Thomas Fisher Unwin, husband of British Liberal politician Jane Cobden
Jane Cobden
in 1882.[1] The latterly more famous Stanley Unwin (his nephew) started his career by working in his uncle's firm. In 1914 Stanley Unwin purchased a controlling interest in the firm George Allen and Sons, and established George Allen and Unwin, later to become Allen and Unwin. Unwin retired to his home in Sussex in 1926, following which his publishing house merged with Ernest Benn Limited.[1] References[edit]^ a b Codell, Julie F. (2004), "Unwin, Thomas Fisher (1848–1935)", Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.), Oxford University Press, retrieved 11 January 2008  (subscription or UK public library membership required)This publishing-related article is a stub
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Time (magazine)
Time
Time
(styled TIME) is an American weekly news magazine and news website published in New York City. It was founded in 1923 and originally run by Henry Luce. A European edition ( Time
Time
Europe, formerly known as Time
Time
Atlantic) is published in London and also covers the Middle East, Africa and, since 2003, Latin America. An Asian edition ( Time
Time
Asia) is based in Hong Kong. The South Pacific edition, which covers Australia, New Zealand and the Pacific Islands, is based in Sydney
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Caricature
A caricature is a rendered image showing the features of its subject in a simplified or exaggerated way through sketching, pencil strokes, or through other artistic drawings. In literature, a caricature is a description of a person using exaggeration of some characteristics and oversimplification of others.[1] Caricatures can be insulting or complimentary and can serve a political purpose or be drawn solely for entertainment. Caricatures of politicians are commonly used in editorial cartoons, while caricatures of movie stars are often found in entertainment magazines.Contents1 Etymology 2 History 3 Notable caricaturists 4 Computerization 5 The caricature advantage 6 Modern use6.1 Museums7 See also 8 References 9 External linksEtymology[edit] The term is derived from the Italian caricare—to charge or load
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Max Beerbohm
Sir Henry Maximilian "Max" Beerbohm (24 August 1872 – 20 May 1956) was an English essayist, parodist, and caricaturist under the signature Max. He first became known in the 1890s as a dandy and a humorist. He was the drama critic for the Saturday Review from 1898 until 1910, when he relocated to Rapallo, Italy. In his later years he was popular for his occasional radio broadcasts. Among his best-known works is his only novel, Zuleika Dobson, published in 1911
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Bertrand Russell
Bertrand Arthur William Russell, 3rd Earl Russell, OM, FRS[61] (/ˈrʌsəl/; 18 May 1872 – 2 February 1970) was a British philosopher, logician, mathematician, historian, writer, social critic, political activist and Nobel laureate.[62][63] At various points in his life, Russell considered himself a liberal, a socialist and a pacifist, but he also admitted that he had "never been any of these things, in any profound sense".[64] Russell was born in Monmouthshire into one of the most prominent aristocratic families in the United Kingdom.[65] In the early 20th century, Russell led the British "revolt against idealism".[66] He is considered one of the founders of analytic philosophy along with his predecessor Gottlob Frege, colleague G. E. Moore and protégé Ludwig Wittgenstein. He is widely held to be one of the 20th century's premier logicians.[63] With A. N. Whitehead he wrote Principia Mathematica, an attempt to create a logical basis for mathematics
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Cowboy
A cowboy is an animal herder who tends cattle on ranches in North America, traditionally on horseback, and often performs a multitude of other ranch-related tasks. The historic American cowboy of the late 19th century arose from the vaquero traditions of northern Mexico
Mexico
and became a figure of special significance and legend.[1] A subtype, called a wrangler, specifically tends the horses used to work cattle. In addition to ranch work, some cowboys work for or participate in rodeos
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Front (military)
If Wiktionary
Wiktionary
has a definition already, change this tag to TWCleanup2 or else consider a soft redirect to Wiktionary
Wiktionary
by replacing the text on this page with Wi . If Wiktionary
Wiktionary
does not have the definition yet, consider moving the whole article to Wiktionary
Wiktionary
by replacing this tag with the template Copy to Wiktionary
Wiktionary
. This template will no longer automatically categorize articles as candidates to move to Wiktionary.(Learn how and when to remove this template message)The Western Front in 1915–16A military front or battlefront is a contested armed frontier between opposing forces. It can be a local or tactical front, or it can range to a theater
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