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G. A. Henty
George Alfred Henty (8 December 1832 – 16 November 1902) was a prolific English novelist and war correspondent.[1][2] He is best known for his historical adventure stories that were popular in the late 19th century. His works include The Dragon & The Raven (1886), For The Temple (1888), Under Drake's Flag (1883) and In Freedom's Cause (1885).Contents1 Biography 2 Influence 3 Bibliography3.1 Misattribution 3.2 UK and US availability4 Controversial views 5 List of titles 6 Adaptation 7 References 8 External linksBiography[edit] G. A. Henty
G. A. Henty
was born in Trumpington, near Cambridge. He was a sickly child who had to spend long periods in bed. During his frequent illnesses he became an avid reader and developed a wide range of interests which he carried into adulthood. He attended Westminster School, London, and later Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge,[3] where he was a keen sportsman
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Elliott & Fry
Elliott & Fry was a Victorian photography studio founded in 1863 by Joseph John Elliott (14 October 1835 – 30 March 1903) and Clarence Edmund Fry (1840 – 12 April 1897).[1] For a century the firm's core business was taking and publishing photographs of the Victorian public and social, artistic, scientific and political luminaries. In the 1880s the company operated three studios and four large storage facilities for negatives, with a printing works at Barnet. The firm's first address was 55 & 56 Baker Street
Baker Street
in London, premises they occupied until 1919. The studio employed a number of photographers, including Francis Henry Hart and Alfred James Philpott in the Edwardian era, Herbert Lambert and Walter Benington
Walter Benington
in the 1920s and 1930s and subsequently William Flowers
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Harper & Brothers
Harper is an American publishing house, currently the flagship imprint of global publisher HarperCollins.Contents1 History1.1 J. & J. Harper (1817–1833) 1.2 Harper & Brothers (1833–1962) 1.3 Harper & Row (1962–1990) 1.4 HarperCollins
HarperCollins
(1990–present)2 Paperbacks 3 Authors and illustrators 4 See also 5 References 6 Further reading6.1 Primary sources7 External linksHistory[edit] J. & J. Harper (1817–1833)[edit]Eastman Johnson's portrait of Joseph Wesley Harper, c. 1880James Harper and his brother John, printers by training, started their book publishing business J. & J. Harper in 1817. Their two brothers, Joseph Wesley Harper and Fletcher Harper, joined them in the mid-1820s. Harper & Brothers (1833–1962)[edit] Further information: Category: Harper & Brothers books The company changed its name to "Harper & Brothers" in 1833
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Brompton Cemetery
Coordinates: 51°29′06″N 0°11′27″W / 51.4849°N 0.1908°W / 51.4849; -0.1908Brompton CemeteryDetailsEstablished 1839Location London, SW10Country EnglandType PublicSize 39 acres (16 ha)No. of graves 35,000+No. of interments 205,000Website Official website Brompton Cemetery
Brompton Cemetery
is a London
London
cemetery in the Royal Borough of Kensington
Kensington
and Chelsea. It is managed by The Royal Parks, and is one of the Magnificent Seven cemeteries. Established by Act of Parliament and erected in 1839, it opened in 1840 and was originally known as the West of London
London
and Westminster Cemetery. Consecrated by Charles James Blomfield, the Bishop of London
London
in June 1840, it is one of Britain's oldest and most distinguished garden cemeteries
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Weymouth Harbour, Dorset
Weymouth Harbour
Harbour
(or the Old Harbour) is a picturesque harbour at the seaside town of Weymouth in Dorset, southern England.[1] It has a 17th-century waterfront.[2]Contents1 Overview 2 Video 3 See also 4 References4.1 Notes 4.2 Bibliography5 External linksOverview[edit] Weymouth Harbour
Harbour
has included cross-channel ferries, and is home to pleasure boats and private yachts. Nearby to the south, the much larger Portland Harbour
Portland Harbour
is home to the Weymouth and Portland National Sailing Academy, where the sailing events of the 2012 Olympic Games and Paralympic Games were held. The disused Weymouth Harbour
Harbour
Tramway runs along the north side of the harbour to the also disused Weymouth Quay railway station
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Henry Everett McNeil
Henry Everett McNeil (1862 - December 1929) was a leading children's author of the 1910s and 1920s, and was an original and core member of the Kalem Club circle around the writer H. P. Lovecraft. McNeil played a crucial role in the career of H.P. Lovecraft, in that he was the first to urge Lovecraft to submit his fiction to Weird Tales magazine in the early 1920s.[1]Contents1 Biography 2 Bibliography 3 Further reading 4 References 5 External linksBiography[edit] McNeil's fiction was published under the name 'Everett McNeil' and consisted of boys' adventure books and stories for magazines such as Boy's Life. His tales were historical in setting, often featuring immense wild landscapes, and were "addressed to boys, written for boys" without any moralistic preaching or many political details. In book form his fiction appears to have retained a popularity from the 1900s into the 1950s, when it went out of fashion
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Frederick Sadleir Brereton
Frederick Sadleir Brereton CBE (5 August 1872 – 12 August 1957) was a decorated soldier and an author of children's books on heroic deeds conducted in the name of the British Empire.[1] Brereton was a prolific author. By the time he died he had written over 40 books.Contents1 First World War 2 Personal life 3 Bibliography 4 References 5 External linksFirst World War[edit] Brereton served in the RAMC during the First World War with the rank of Brevet Lieutenant Colonel
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Aviation
Aviation
Aviation
is the practical aspect or art of aeronautics, being the design, development, production, operation and use of aircraft, especially heavier-than-air aircraft.Contents1 Etymology 2 History2.1 Early beginnings 2.2 Lighter than air 2.3 Heavier than air3 Operations of aircraft3.1 Civil aviation3.1.1 Air transport 3.1.2 General aviation3.2 Military aviation3.2.1 Types of military aviation3.3 Air safety4
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First World War
Allied victoryCentral Powers' victory on the Eastern Front nullified by defeat on the Western Front Fall of the German, Russian, Ottoman, and Austro-Hungarian empires Russian Civil War
Russian Civil War
and foundation of the Soviet Union Formation of new countries in Europe
Europe
and the Middle East Transfer of German colonies
German colonies
and regions of the former Ottoman Empire to other powers Establishment of the League of Nations
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F. Scott Fitzgerald
Francis Scott Key
Francis Scott Key
Fitzgerald (September 24, 1896 – December 21, 1940) was an American writer, whose works illustrate the Jazz Age. While he achieved limited success in his lifetime, he is now widely regarded as one of the greatest American writers of the 20th century. Fitzgerald is considered a member of the "Lost Generation" of the 1920s. He finished four novels: This Side of Paradise, The Beautiful and Damned, The Great Gatsby, and Tender Is the Night
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Blackie And Son
Blackie and Son
Blackie and Son
was a publishing house in Glasgow, Scotland
Scotland
and London, England from 1890 to 1991. The firm was founded as a bookseller in 1809 by John Blackie (1782-1874) as a partnership with two others and was known as 'Blackie, Fullarton and Company'. It began printing in 1819 using the skill and equipment of Edward Khull.[1] It moved to Glasgow
Glasgow
around 1830 and had premises at 8 Clyde Street facing the River Clyde.[2] Following the retirement of Fullarton the company was renamed 'Blackie and Son' in 1831, remaining in the Clyde Street property, and becoming a public limited company in 1890. The business later had premises at 16/18 William IV Street, Charing Cross, London, 17 Stanhope Street in Glasgow
Glasgow
and 5 South College Street in Edinburgh.[3] The company also opened offices in Canada and India
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Arthur B. Robinson
Arthur Brouhard "Art" Robinson (born March 24, 1942[1]) is an American biochemist, conservative activist, and politician
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Napoleonic Wars
The Napoleonic Wars
Napoleonic Wars
(1803–1815) were a series of major conflicts pitting the French Empire and its allies, led by Napoleon
Napoleon
I, against a fluctuating array of European powers formed into various coalitions, financed and usually led by the United Kingdom. The wars stemmed from the unresolved disputes associated with the French Revolution
French Revolution
and its resultant conflict. The wars are often categorised into five conflicts, each termed after the coalition that fought Napoleon; the Third Coalition
Third Coalition
(1805), the Fourth (1806–07), Fifth (1809), Sixth (1813), and the Seventh and final (1815). Napoleon, upon ascending to First Consul of France
France
in 1799, had inherited a chaotic republic; he subsequently created a state with stable finances, a strong bureaucracy, and a well-trained army
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Xenophobic
Xenophobia
Xenophobia
is the fear and distrust of that which is perceived to be foreign or strange.[1][2] Xenophobia
Xenophobia
can manifest itself in many ways involving the relations and perceptions of an ingroup towards an outgroup, including a fear of losing identity,
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Loyalist (American Revolution)
Loyalists were American colonists who remained loyal to the British Crown during the American Revolutionary War. At the time they were often called Tories, Royalists, or King's Men. They were opposed by the Patriots, those who supported the revolution and called them "persons inimical to the liberties of America".[1] Prominent Loyalists repeatedly assured the British government that many thousands of loyalists would spring to arms and fight for the crown. The British government acted in expectation of that, especially in the southern campaigns in 1780-81. In practice, the number of loyalists in military service was far lower than expected. Across the colonies, Patriots watched suspected Loyalists very closely, and would not tolerate any organized Loyalist opposition. Many outspoken or militarily active loyalists were forced to flee, especially to their stronghold of New York City
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American Revolution
The American Revolution
Revolution
was a colonial revolt that took place between 1765 and 1783. The American Patriots in the Thirteen Colonies
Thirteen Colonies
won independence from Great Britain, becoming the United States
United States
of America. They defeated the British in the American Revolutionary War in alliance with France and others. Members of American colonial society argued the position of "no taxation without representation", starting with the Stamp Act Congress in 1765. They rejected the authority of the British Parliament to tax them because they lacked members in that governing body
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