HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Fyodor Stravinsky
Fyodor Ignatievich Stravinsky
Stravinsky
(Russian: Фёдор Игна́тиевич Страви́нский), 20 June [O.S. 8 June] 1843, in Golovintsy, Minsk Governorate
Minsk Governorate
 – 4 December [O.S. 21 November] 1902) was a Russian bass opera singer and actor of Polish descent. He was the father of Igor Stravinsky
Stravinsky
and the grandfather of Soulima Stravinsky. Life and career[edit] His father Ignacy was a Catholic and came from a noble Polish family of Sulima-Strawiński[a]; his mother, Alexandra Ivanovna Skorokhodova, was a daughter of a Russian small landowner
[...More...]

"Fyodor Stravinsky" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Alexander Dargomyzhsky
Alexander Sergeyevich Dargomyzhsky (Russian: Алекса́ндр Серге́евич Даргомы́жский) (14 February [O.S. 2 February] 1813 – 17 January [O.S. 5 January] 1869) was a 19th-century Russian composer. He bridged the gap in Russian opera composition between Mikhail Glinka
Mikhail Glinka
and the later generation of The Five and Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky. Dargomyzhsky was born in Troitsko village, Belyovsky District, Tula Governorate, and educated in Saint Petersburg. He was already known as a talented musical amateur when in 1833 he met Mikhail Glinka
Mikhail Glinka
and was encouraged to devote himself to composition
[...More...]

"Alexander Dargomyzhsky" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Hryhory Kvitka
Hryhory Kvitka or Osnovyanenko (1778–1843) was a Ukrainian writer, journalist, and playwright. He was born in the vicinity of Kharkiv. Life and work[edit] Hryhory Kvitka was born in 1778 in the village of Osnova, near the city of Kharkiv, to a family of Ukrainian nobility.[1] He adopted the pen name "Osnovyanenko," a reference to the village of his birth, when he embarked on his literary career.[2] In 1812, G. F. Kvitka begins his social activities. He was appointed the director of a new regular lay theatre open in Kharkov. Osnovyanenko carried his love to theatre through all his life. Later this feeling made him write theatre drama works
[...More...]

"Hryhory Kvitka" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Osip Petrov
Osip Afanasievich Petrov (Russian: Осип Афанасиевич Петров, 15 November [O.S. 3 November] 1806 – 12 March [O.S. 28 February] 1878) was a Ukrainian operatic bass-baritone of great range and renown, whose career centred on St Petersburg.Contents1 Biography 2 Performance repertoire 3 References 4 External linksBiography[edit] Osip Petrov
Osip Petrov
was born in Yelisavetgrad
Yelisavetgrad
(now Kropyvnytskyi) in Ukraine, then part of Russia. He started his career by singing in a church chorus. Petrov then worked in Russian provincial theaters (including Poltava, where he worked together with Mikhail Shchepkin). From 1830 until his death in 1878 he worked for the Mariinsky Theatre, St Petersburg
[...More...]

"Osip Petrov" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky
Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky
Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky
(/ˈɪljɪtʃ tʃaɪˈkɒfski/ IL-yitch chy-KOF-skee;[1] Russian: Пётр Ильи́ч Чайко́вский;[a 1] 25 April/7 May 1840 – 25 October/6 November 1893),[a 2] often anglicized as Peter Ilich Tchaikovsky, was a Russian composer of the romantic period, some of whose works are among the most popular music in the classical repertoire. He was the first Russian composer whose music made a lasting impression internationally, bolstered by his appearances as a guest conductor in Europe and the United States. Tchaikovsky was honored in 1884 by Emperor Alexander III, and awarded a lifetime pension. Although musically precocious, Tchaikovsky was educated for a career as a civil servant. There was scant opportunity for a musical career in Russia at that time and no system of public music education
[...More...]

"Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov
Nikolai Andreyevich Rimsky-Korsakov[a 1] (18 March [O.S. 6 March] 1844 – 21 June [O.S. 8 June] 1908)[a 2] was a Russian composer, and a member of the group of composers known as The Five.[a 3] He was a master of orchestration. His best-known orchestral compositions—Capriccio Espagnol, the Russian Easter Festival Overture, and the symphonic suite Scheherazade—are staples of the classical music repertoire, along with suites and excerpts from some of his 15 operas. Scheherazade
Scheherazade
is an example of his frequent use of fairy tale and folk subjects. Rimsky-Korsakov believed, as did fellow composer Mily Balakirev
Mily Balakirev
and critic Vladimir Stasov, in developing a nationalistic, "Moscalski" style of classical music
[...More...]

"Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Mykola Lysenko
Mykola Vitaliyovych Lysenko (Ukrainian: Мико́ла Віта́лійович Ли́сенко, 22 March [O.S. 10 March] 1842 – 6 November [O.S. 24 October] 1912) was a Ukrainian composer, pianist, conductor and ethnomusicologist.Contents1 Biography 2 Music2.1 Vocal music 2.2 Piano and chamber music 2.3 Operas 2.4 Musicological studies3 See also 4 Notes 5 References 6 External linksBiography[edit] Lysenko was born in Hrynky, Kremenchuk
Kremenchuk
county, Poltava
Poltava
Governorate,[1] the son of Vitaliy Romanovych Lysenko (Ukrainian: Віталій Романович Лисенко). From childhood he became very interested in the folksongs of Ukrainian peasants and by the poetry of Taras Shevchenko. When Shevchenko's body was brought to Ukraine
Ukraine
after his death in 1861, Lysenko was a pallbearer
[...More...]

"Mykola Lysenko" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ilya Repin
Ilya Yefimovich Repin (Russian: Илья́ Ефи́мович Ре́пин, tr. Il'ya Yefimovich Repin; Finnish: Ilja Jefimovitš Repin; 5 August [O.S. 24 July] 1844 – 29 September 1930) was a Russian[1] realist painter. He was the most renowned Russian artist of the 19th century, when his position in the world of art was comparable to that of Leo Tolstoy
Leo Tolstoy
in literature. He played a major role in bringing Russian art into the mainstream of European culture. His major works include Barge Haulers on the Volga
Barge Haulers on the Volga
(1873), Religious Procession in Kursk Province (1883) and Reply of the Zaporozhian Cossacks (1880–91). Repin was born in Chuguyev, in Kharkov Governorate, Russian Empire into a family of "military settlers".[2] His father traded horses and his grandmother ran an inn. He entered military school to study surveying
[...More...]

"Ilya Repin" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Reply Of The Zaporozhian Cossacks
Reply of the Zaporozhian Cossacks to Sultan Mehmed IV of the Ottoman Empire, also known as Cossacks of Saporog Are Drafting a Manifesto (Ukrainian: Запорожці пишуть листа турецькому султану), is a painting by Russian[1] artist Ilya Repin. The 2.03 m (6 foot 7 inch) by 3.58 m (11 foot 9 inch) canvas was started in 1880 and finished in 1891. Repin recorded the years of work along the lower edge of the canvas
[...More...]

"Reply Of The Zaporozhian Cossacks" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Taras Shevchenko
Taras Hryhorovych Shevchenko[6] (March 9 [O.S. February 25] 1814 – March 10 [O.S. February 26] 1861) was a Ukrainian poet, writer, artist, public and political figure, as well as folklorist and ethnographer. His literary heritage is regarded to be the foundation of modern Ukrainian literature
Ukrainian literature
and, to a large extent, the modern Ukrainian language. Shevchenko is also known for many masterpieces as a painter and an illustrator.[7] He was a member of the Sts Cyril and Methodius Brotherhood and an academician of the Imperial Academy of Arts
[...More...]

"Taras Shevchenko" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ivan Kotliarevsky
Ivan Petrovych Kotliarevsky (Ukrainian: Іван Петрович Котляревський) (9 September [O.S. 29 August] 1769 in Poltava
Poltava
– 10 November [O.S. 29 October] 1838 in Poltava, Russian Empire, now Ukraine), was a Ukrainian writer, poet and playwright, social activist, regarded as the pioneer of modern Ukrainian literature. Kotlyarevsky was a veteran of the Russo-Turkish War.Contents1 Biography 2 The first modern Ukrainian writer 3 Legacy 4 English translation 5 References 6 External linksBiography[edit] Kotlyarevsky was born in the Ukrainian city of Poltava
Poltava
in the family of a clerk Petro Kotliarevsky of Ogończyk
Ogończyk
Coat of Arms[1][2]
[...More...]

"Ivan Kotliarevsky" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Kiev
Kiev
Kiev
(/ˈkiːɛf, -ɛv/ KEE-ef, -ev)[10] or Kyiv (Ukrainian: Київ, translit. Kyiv [ˈkɪjiu̯] ( listen); Old East Slavic: Кыѥвъ, translit. Kyjev; Polish: Kijów Polish pronunciation: [ˈkʲijuf]; Russian: Киев, translit. Kiyev [ˈkʲiɪf]) is the capital and largest city of Ukraine, located in the north central part of the country on the Dnieper. The population in July 2015 was 2,887,974[2] (though higher estimated numbers have been cited in the press),[11] making Kiev
Kiev
the 7th most populous city in Europe.[12] Kiev
Kiev
is an important industrial, scientific, educational, and cultural centre of Eastern Europe
[...More...]

"Kiev" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Panteleimon Kulish
Panteleimon Oleksandrovych Kulish (also spelled Panteleymon or Pantelejmon Kuliš, Ukrainian: Пантелеймон Куліш, August 7, 1819 – February 14, 1897) was a Ukrainian writer, critic, poet, folklorist, and translator.Contents1 Overview 2 Life 3 Further reading 4 External linksOverview[edit] Panteleimon Kulish, born 7 August 1819 in Voronizh (now in Sumy Oblast), d 14 February 1897 in Motronivka, Chernigov Governorate. Prominent writer, historian, ethnographer, and translator. He was born into an impoverished Cossack-gentry family. After completing only five years at the Novhorod-Siverskyi gymnasium he enrolled at Kiev University in 1837 but was not allowed to finish his studies because he was not a noble
[...More...]

"Panteleimon Kulish" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Feodor Chaliapin
Feodor Ivanovich Chaliapin (Russian: Фёдор Ива́нович Шаля́пин, tr. Fyodor Ivanovich Shalyapin, IPA: [ˈfʲɵdər ɪˈvanəvʲɪtɕ ʂɐˈlʲapʲɪn]; February 13 [O.S. February 1] 1873 – April 12, 1938) was a Russian opera singer. Possessing a deep and expressive bass voice, he enjoyed an important international career at major opera houses and is often credited with establishing the tradition of naturalistic acting in his chosen art form.[1] During the first phase of his career, Chaliapin endured direct competition from three other great basses: the powerful Lev Sibiriakov (1869–1942), the more lyrical Vladimir Kastorsky (1871–1948), and Dmitri Buchtoyarov (1866–1918), whose voice was intermediate between those of Sibiriakov and Kastorsky
[...More...]

"Feodor Chaliapin" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Polish Language
Polish (język polski, polszczyzna) is a West Slavic language spoken primarily in Poland
Poland
and is the native language of the Poles. It belongs to the Lechitic subgroup of the West Slavic languages.[8] Polish is the official language of Poland, but it is also used throughout the world by Polish minorities in other countries. There are over 55 million Polish language
Polish language
speakers around the world and it is one of the official languages of the European Union. Its written standard is the Polish alphabet, which has 9 additions to the letters of the basic Latin script
Latin script
(ą, ć, ę, ł, ń, ó, ś, ź, ż)
[...More...]

"Polish Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Vistula
The Vistula
Vistula
(/ˈvɪstjʊlə/; Polish: Wisła
Wisła
[ˈvʲiswa], German: Weichsel [ˈvaɪksl̩], Low German: Wießel, Yiddish: ווייסל‎ Yiddish pronunciation: [vajsl̩]) is the longest and largest river in Poland, at 1,047 kilometres (651 miles) in length. The drainage basin area of the Vistula
Vistula
is 194,424 km2 (75,068 sq mi), of which 168,699 km2 (65,135 sq mi) lies within Poland
Poland
(splitting the country in half)
[...More...]

"Vistula" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.