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Fulton County, Georgia
Fulton County is a county in the north central portion of the U.S. state of Georgia. As of 2017 estimates, the population was 1,041,423, making it Georgia's most populous county and the state's only county with over 1 million inhabitants. Its county seat is Atlanta,[1] which has also been the state capital since 1868. Ninety percent of the City of Atlanta
Atlanta
is within Fulton County (the other 10% lies within DeKalb County). Fulton County is the principal county of the Atlanta metropolitan area. Fulton County is part of the Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Roswell, GA Metropolitan Statistical Area.Contents1 History 2 Government 3 Services 4 Politics4.1 Taxation 4.2 Municipalization 4.3 Secession5 Taxes 6 Geography6.1 Adjacent counties 6.2 National protected areas7 Transportation7.1 Major highways7.1.1 Interstate highways 7.1.2 U.S
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County (United States)
In the United States, an administrative or political subdivision of a state is a county, which is a region having specific boundaries and usually some level of governmental authority.[1] The term "county" is used in 48 U.S. states, while Louisiana
Louisiana
and Alaska
Alaska
have functionally equivalent subdivisions called parishes and boroughs respectively.[1] Most counties have subdivisions which may include municipalities and unincorporated areas. Others have no further divisions, or may serve as a consolidated city-county. Some municipalities are in multiple counties; New York City
New York City
is uniquely partitioned into multiple counties, referred to at the city government level as boroughs. The U.S. federal government
U.S. federal government
uses the term "county equivalent" to describe non-county administrative or statistical areas that are comparable to counties
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Single-member District
A single-member district or single-member constituency is an electoral district that returns one officeholder to a body with multiple members such as a legislature. This is also sometimes called single-winner voting or winner takes all. The alternative are multi-member districts, or the election of a body by the whole electorate voting as one constituency. A number of electoral systems use single-member districts, including plurality voting (first past the post), two-round systems, instant-runoff voting (IRV), approval voting, range voting, Borda count, and Condorcet methods (such as the Minimax Condorcet, Schulze method, and Ranked Pairs). Of these, plurality and runoff voting are the most common. In some countries, such as Australia and India, members of the lower house of parliament are elected from single-member districts; and members of the upper house are elected from multi-member districts
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White Supremacy
White supremacy
White supremacy
or white supremacism is a racist ideology based upon the belief that white people are superior in many ways to people of other races and that therefore white people should be dominant over other races. White supremacy
White supremacy
has roots in scientific racism and it often relies on pseudoscientific arguments
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Lynchings In The United States
Lynching
Lynching
is the practice of murder by extrajudicial action. Lynchings in the United States
United States
rose in number after the American Civil War
American Civil War
in the late 1800s, following the emancipation of slaves; they declined after 1930 but were recorded into the 1960s. Lynchings most frequently targeted African-American men and women in the South, with lynchings also occurring in the North during the Great Migration of blacks into Northern areas. The political message—the promotion of white supremacy and black powerlessness—was an important element of the ritual, with lynchings photographed and published as postcards which were popular souvenirs in the U.S.[1][2] As well as being hanged, victims were sometimes burned alive and tortured, with body parts removed and kept as souvenirs.[3] Lynchings were most frequent from 1890 to the 1920s, with a peak in 1892
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Disfranchisement After Reconstruction Era
Disenfranchisement after the Reconstruction Era[1] in the United States of America was based on a series of laws, new constitutions, and practices in the South that were deliberately used to prevent black citizens from registering to vote and voting. These measures were enacted by the former Confederate states at the turn of the 20th century, and by Oklahoma
Oklahoma
when it gained statehood in 1907,[2] although not by the former border slave states. Their actions were designed to frustrate the objective of the Fifteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution, ratified in 1870, which sought to protect the suffrage of freedmen after the American Civil War. During the later elections of Reconstruction era, beginning in the 1870s, white Democrats used violence by paramilitary groups, as well as fraud, to suppress black Republican voters and turn Republicans out of office
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Austerity
Austerity
Austerity
is a political-economic term referring to policies that aim to reduce government budget deficits through spending cuts, tax increases, or a combination of both.[1][2][3] Austerity
Austerity
measures are used by governments that find it difficult to pay their debts. The measures are meant to reduce the budget deficit by bringing government revenues closer to expenditures, which is assumed to make the payment of debt easier. Austerity
Austerity
measures also demonstrate a government's fiscal discipline to creditors and credit rating agencies. In most macroeconomic models, austerity policies generally increase unemployment as government spending falls[citation needed]. Cutbacks in government spending reduce employment in the public and may also do so in the private sector. Additionally, tax increases can reduce consumption by cutting household disposable income
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Great Depression
The Great Depression
Great Depression
was a severe worldwide economic depression that took place mostly during the 1930s, beginning in the United States. The timing of the Great Depression
Great Depression
varied across nations; in most countries it started in 1929 and lasted until the late-1930s.[1] It was the longest, deepest, and most widespread depression of the 20th century.[2] In the 21st century, the Great Depression
Great Depression
is commonly used as an example of how far the world's economy can decline.[3] The Great Depression
Great Depression
started in the United States
United States
after a major fall in stock prices that began around September 4, 1929, and became worldwide news with the stock market crash of October 29, 1929 (known as Black Tuesday). Between 1929 and 1932, worldwide gross domestic product (GDP) fell by an estimated 15%
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Cession
The act of cession is the assignment of property to another entity. In international law it commonly refers to land transferred by treaty. Ballentine's Law
Law
Dictionary defines cession as "a surrender; a giving up; a relinquishment of jurisdiction by a board in favor of another agency"[1] In contrast with annexation, where property is forcibly given up, cession is voluntary or at least apparently so.Contents1 Examples 2 Specific areas of law2.1 Contract law 2.2 Civil law 2.3 Ecclesiastical law3 Retrocession 4 See also 5 ReferencesExamples[edit] In 1790, the U.S. states of Maryland
Maryland
and Virginia
Virginia
both ceded land to create the District of Columbia, as specified in the U.S. Constitution of the previous year
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Board Of Commissioners
A county commission (also known as a board of county commissioners) is a group of elected officials charged with administering the county government in some states of the United States. County commissions are usually made up of three or more individuals. In some counties in Georgia however, a sole commissioner holds the authority of the commission. (See National Association of Counties http://www.naco.org) The commission acts as the executive of the local government, levies local taxes, administers county governmental services such as prisons, courts, public health oversight, property registration, building code enforcement, and public works such as road maintenance
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County Manager (United States)
A county executive is the head of the executive branch of government in a United States
United States
county. The executive may be an elected or an appointed position. When elected, the executive typically functions either as a voting member of the elected county government, or may have veto power similar to other elected executives such as a governor, president or mayor. When appointed, the executive is usually hired for a specific period of time, but frequently can be dismissed prior to this
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American Civil War
Union victoryDissolution of the Confederate States U.S. territorial integrity preserved Slavery abolished Beginning of the Reconstruction EraBelligerents United States  Confederate StatesCommanders and leaders Abraham Lincoln Ulysses S. Grant William T. Sherman David Farragut George B. McClellan Henry Halleck George Meade and others Jefferson Davis Robert E. Lee  J. E. Johnston  G. T. Beauregard  A. S
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At-Large
At-large is a designation for members of a governing body who are elected or appointed to represent the whole membership of the body (for example, a city, state or province, nation, club or association), rather than a subset of that membership. At-large voting is in contrast to voting by electoral districts. If an at-large election is called to choose a single candidate, a single-winner voting system must necessarily be used
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Senior Center
A senior center is a type of community center where older adults can congregate to fulfill many of their social, physical, emotional, and intellectual needs. In the United States, many towns have senior centers that are usually locally funded, though some may receive state and federal monies.[1][2] Activities[edit] Activities vary by center and are based on the size of the center and funding. Activities can include: Dance
Dance
room[3] Game Room[3] Computer lab[3] Craft
Craft
room[3] Library[3] Card room[3] Meeting room[3] Horse shoe pits[3] Exercise room[3] Swimming pool Lap poolExternal links[edit]Directory of Senior Centers based in the United States - OurSeniorCenter.com Center for Senior HealthNotes[edit]^ Joseph, M (2011). Continuing Education in Senior Centers: A Handbook. Amazon. ISBN 978-1-4564-0943-2. Retrieved 2011-10-14.  ^ Williams and Downs (1984). Educational Activity Programs for Older Adults
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Nonprofit
A non-profit organization (NPO), also known as a non-business entity[1] or non-profit institution,[2] is dedicated to furthering a particular social cause or advocating for a shared point of view. In economic terms, it is an organization that uses its surplus of the revenues to further achieve its ultimate objective, rather than distributing its income to the organization's shareholders, leaders, or members. Non-profits are tax exempt or charitable, meaning they do not pay income tax on the money that they receive for their organization. They can operate in religious, scientific, research, or educational settings. The key aspects of nonprofits is accountability, trustworthiness, honesty, and openness to every person who has invested time, money, and faith into the organization. Nonprofit organizations are accountable to the donors, funders, volunteers, program recipients, and the public community
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Grant (money)
Grants are non-repayable funds or products disbursed or gifted by one party (grant makers), often a government department, corporation, foundation or trust, to a recipient, often (but not always) a nonprofit entity, educational institution, business or an individual. In order to receive a grant, some form of "Grant Writing" often referred to as either a proposal or an application is required. Most grants are made to fund a specific project and require some level of compliance and reporting. The grant writing process involves an applicant submitting a proposal (or submission) to a potential funder, either on the applicant's own initiative or in response to a Request for Proposal from the funder. Other grants can be given to individuals, such as victims of natural disasters or individuals who seek to open a small business
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