HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Fulling
Fulling, also known as tucking or walking (spelt waulking in Scotland), is a step in woollen clothmaking which involves the cleansing of cloth (particularly wool) to eliminate oils, dirt, and other impurities, and making it thicker. The worker who does the job is a fuller, tucker, or walker,[1] all of which have become common surnames. The Welsh word for a fulling mill is pandy, which appears in many place-names, for example Tonypandy
Tonypandy
("fulling mill lea").Contents1 Process1.1 Scouring 1.2 Thickening2 Fulling
Fulling
mills 3 History 4 See also 5 References 6 BibliographyProcess[edit] Fulling
Fulling
involves two processes, scouring and milling (thickening). Originally, fulling was carried out by the pounding of the woollen cloth with a club, or the fuller's feet or hands. In Scottish Gaelic tradition, this process was accompanied by waulking songs, which women sang to set the pace
[...More...]

"Fulling" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Tuck (sewing)
In sewing, a tuck is a fold or pleat in fabric that is sewn in place. Small tucks, especially multiple parallel tucks, may be used to decorate clothing or household linens. When the tucks are very narrow, they are called pintucks or Pin-tucking. Tucks are also used to shorten a finished garment, especially a child's garment, so that it may be lengthened ("let down") as the child grows by removing the stitching holding the tuck in place. In Louisa May Alcott's Little Women, Amy says:"My only comfort," she said to Meg, with tears in her eyes, "is that Mother doesn't take tucks in my dresses whenever I'm naughty, as Maria Parks's mother does
[...More...]

"Tuck (sewing)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Wales
Wales
Wales
(/ˈweɪlz/ ( listen); Welsh: Cymru [ˈkəmri] ( listen)) is a country that is part of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
and the island of Great Britain.[8] It is bordered by England
England
to the east, the Irish Sea
Irish Sea
to the north and west, and the Bristol Channel
Bristol Channel
to the south. It had a population in 2011 of 3,063,456 and has a total area of 20,779 km2 (8,023 sq mi). Wales has over 1,680 miles (2,700 km) of coastline and is largely mountainous, with its higher peaks in the north and central areas, including Snowdon
Snowdon
(Yr Wyddfa), its highest summit
[...More...]

"Wales" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Carding
Carding
Carding
is a mechanical process that disentangles, cleans and intermixes fibres to produce a continuous web or sliver suitable for subsequent processing.[1] This is achieved by passing the fibers between differentially moving surfaces covered with card clothing. It breaks up locks and unorganised clumps of fibre and then aligns the individual fibers to be parallel with each other
[...More...]

"Carding" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Cam
A cam is a rotating or sliding piece in a mechanical linkage used especially in transforming rotary motion into linear motion.[1][2] It is often a part of a rotating wheel (e.g. an eccentric wheel) or shaft (e.g. a cylinder with an irregular shape) that strikes a lever at one or more points on its circular path
[...More...]

"Cam" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Aluminium Silicate
Aluminium
Aluminium
silicate (or aluminum silicate) is a name commonly applied to chemical compounds which are derived from aluminium oxide, Al2O3 and silicon dioxide, SiO2 which may be anhydrous or hydrated, naturally occurring as minerals or synthetic
[...More...]

"Aluminium Silicate" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Hydrous
In chemistry, a hydrate is a substance that contains water or its constituent elements. The chemical state of the water varies widely between different classes of hydrates, some of which were so labeled before their chemical structure was understood.Contents1 Chemical nature1.1 Organic chemistry 1.2 Inorganic chemistry 1.3 Clathrate
Clathrate
hydrates2 Stability 3 See also 4 ReferencesChemical nature[edit] Organic chemistry[edit] In organic chemistry, a hydrate is a compound formed by the addition of water or its elements to another molecule. For example: ethanol, CH3–CH2–OH, is the product of the hydration reaction of ethene, CH2=CH2, formed by the addition of H to one C and OH to the other C, and so can be considered as the hydrate of ethene. A molecule of water may be eliminated, for example by the action of sulfuric acid
[...More...]

"Hydrous" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ammonium
The ammonium cation is a positively charged polyatomic ion with the chemical formula NH+ 4. It is formed by the protonation of ammonia (NH3)
[...More...]

"Ammonium" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Urine Tax
Pecunia non olet ("money does not stink") is a Latin saying. The phrase is ascribed to the Roman emperor Vespasian (ruled AD 69–79).[1]Contents1 History 2 In literature 3 References 4 Sources 5 External linksHistory[edit]"Vespasienne" in Montreal, Canada, 1930Vespasian imposed a Urine Tax (Latin: vectigal urinae) on the distribution of urine from public urinals in Rome's Cloaca Maxima (great sewer) system. (The Roman lower classes urinated into pots which were emptied into cesspools.) The urine collected from public urinals was sold as an ingredient for several chemical processes. It was used in tanning, and also by launderers as a source of ammonia to clean and whiten woollen togas. The buyers of the urine paid the tax. The Roman historian Suetonius reports that when Vespasian's son Titus complained about the disgusting nature of the tax, his father held up a gold coin and asked whether he felt offended by its smell (sciscitans num odore offenderetur)
[...More...]

"Urine Tax" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Urine
Urine
Urine
is a liquid by-product of metabolism in humans and in many animals. Urine
Urine
flows from the kidneys through the ureters to the urinary bladder. Urination
Urination
results in urine being excreted from the body through the urethra. The cellular metabolism generates many by-products which are rich in nitrogen and must be cleared from the bloodstream, such as urea, uric acid, and creatinine. These by-products are expelled from the body during urination, which is the primary method for excreting water-soluble chemicals from the body. A urinalysis can detect nitrogenous wastes of the mammalian body. Urine
Urine
has a role in the earth's nitrogen cycle. In balanced ecosystems urine fertilizes the soil and thus helps plants to grow. Therefore, urine can be used as a fertilizer. Some animals use it to mark their territories
[...More...]

"Urine" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Tappet
A tappet is a projection that imparts a linear motion to some other component within a mechanism.Contents1 Beam engines 2 Internal combustion engines2.1 Adjustment 2.2 Hydraulic tappets 2.3 Sidevalve engines 2.4 Overhead cam
Overhead cam
engines 2.5 Overhead rockers3 Other uses 4 Notes 5 ReferencesBeam engines[edit]Adjustable tappet block on the vertical plug rod of a beam engine at Leawood Pump House. It acts on the curved horn beneath itThe term is first recorded as part of the valve gear of Thomas Newcomen's atmospheric beam engine, a precursor to the steam engine. The first Newcomen engines had manually worked valves, but within a few years, by 1715, this repetitive task had been automated. The beam of the engine had a vertical 'plug rod' hung from it, alongside the cylinder
[...More...]

"Tappet" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Crusades
After 1291Smyrniote 1343–1351 Alexandrian 1365 Savoyard 1366 Barbary 1390 Nicopolis 1396 Varna
Varna
1443 Portuguese 1481 Northern Crusades
Northern Crusades
(1147–1410)Wendish 1147 Swedish<
[...More...]

"Crusades" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic
or Scots Gaelic, sometimes also referred to simply as Gaelic (Gàidhlig [ˈkaːlikʲ] ( listen)) or the Gaelic, is a Celtic language native to the Gaels
Gaels
of Scotland. A member of the Goidelic branch of the Celtic languages, Scottish Gaelic, like Modern Irish and Manx, developed out of Middle Irish. Most of modern Scotland was once Gaelic-speaking, as evidenced especially by Gaelic-language placenames.[3] In the 2011 census of Scotland, 57,375 people (1.1% of the Scottish population aged over three years old) reported as able to speak Gaelic, 1,275 fewer than in 2001
[...More...]

"Scottish Gaelic" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Tonypandy
Tonypandy
Tonypandy
/tɒnəˈpændi/ is a town located in the county borough of Rhondda
Rhondda
Cynon Taf, within the historic county boundaries of Glamorgan, Wales, lying in the Rhondda
Rhondda
Fawr Valley. A former industrial coal mining town, today Tonypandy
Tonypandy
is best known as the site of the 1910 Tonypandy
Tonypandy
Riots.Contents1 History1.1 Pre-industrial 1.2 Industrial era2 Sports and recreation 3 Notable people 4 ReferencesHistory[edit] Pre-industrial[edit] The Tonypandy
Tonypandy
area contains several prehistoric sites, the main one being Mynydd y Gelli. Located to the north-west of the town, the remains of an Iron Age
Iron Age
settlement Hen Dre'r Gelli lies on the slopes of Mynydd Y Gelli hill between Tonypandy
Tonypandy
and Gelli
[...More...]

"Tonypandy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Welsh (language)
All UK speakers: 700,000+ (2012)[1]Wales: 562,016 speakers (19.0% of the population of Wales),[2] (data from 2011 Census); All skills (speaking, reading, or writing): 630,062 language users[3] England: 110,000–150,000 (estimated) Argentina: 1,500-5,000[4][5](data not from 2011 census) Canada: L1,<3,885,[6] United States: ~2,235 (2009-2013) (2017)Language familyIndo-EuropeanCelticInsular CelticBrittonicWesternWelshEarly formsCommon BrittonicOld WelshMiddle WelshWriting systemLatin (Welsh alphabet) Welsh BrailleOfficial statusOfficial language inWalesRecognised minority language in United Kingdom
[...More...]

"Welsh (language)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Normandy
Normandy
Normandy
(/ˈnɔːrməndi/; French: Normandie, pronounced [nɔʁmɑ̃di] ( listen), Norman: Normaundie, from Old French
Old French
Normanz, plural of Normant, originally from the word for "northman" in several Scandinavian languages)[2] is one of the 18 regions of France, roughly corresponding to the historical Duchy of Normandy. Administratively, Normandy
Normandy
is divided into five départements: Calvados, Eure, Manche, Orne, and Seine-Maritime. It covers 30,627 square kilometres (11,825 sq mi),[3] comprising roughly 5% of the territory of metropolitan France
[...More...]

"Normandy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.