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Front-wheel Drive
Front-wheel drive
Front-wheel drive
(FWD) is a form of engine and transmission layout used in motor vehicles, where the engine drives the front wheels only. Most modern front-wheel-drive vehicles feature a transverse engine, rather than the conventional longitudinal engine arrangement generally found in rear-wheel-drive and four-wheel drive vehicles.Contents1 Location of engine and transmission 2 History2.1 Prior to 1900 2.2
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Kop Hill Climb
The Kop Hill Climb is a hillclimb in Princes Risborough, Buckinghamshire. The climb was originally established in 1910 but due to a minor accident involving a spectator on the public road that formed the hillclimb, the last competitive event was held on 28 March 1925. The RAC then banned all motorsport on public roads, making the Kop Hill Climb the last of its kind to be run on the public highways in the UK. Since 2009 Kop Hill has been the focus of an annual revival run as a non-competitive, charity event.Contents1 The Kop Hill Climb revival 2 The original Kop Hill Climb event 3 Records 4 References 5 External linksThe Kop Hill Climb revival[edit] The hillclimb was initially revived in 1999[1] by the Town Council and the Bean Car Club as part of the Risborough Festival, and has become an annual event again
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J. Walter Christie
John Walter Christie (May 6, 1865 – January 11, 1944) was an American engineer and inventor.[1] He is best known for developing the Christie suspension
Christie suspension
system used in a number of World War II-era tank designs, most notably the Soviet BT and T-34[2] series, and the British Covenanter and Crusader Cruiser tanks, as well as the Comet heavy cruiser tank.[3]Contents1 Early life and career 2 Later innovations and bureaucratic frustrations 3 Dealings with foreign governments 4 Later life and work 5 See also 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksEarly life and career[edit] Christie was born in the Campbell-Christie House
Campbell-Christie House
in New Milford, New Jersey on May 6, 1865. He started working at the age of sixteen at the Delamater Iron Works while taking classes at the Cooper Union
Cooper Union
in New York City
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Renault
Coordinates: 48°49′53″N 2°13′42″E / 48.831455°N 2.228273°E / 48.831455; 2.228273 Renault
Renault
S
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Ruxton (automobile)
The Ruxton was a front-wheel drive automobile produced by the New Era Motors Company of New York, New York, United States, during 1929 and 1930. The car was the brainchild of William Muller and was built in the Board Machine plant in Philadelphia, Moon Motor Car
Moon Motor Car
factory in St. Louis, Missouri, and Kissel Motors of Hartford, Wisconsin, who also produced the car's transmission unit.Contents1 A car designed to sell to an automotive company 2 Moon, Kissel, Ruxton Connection 3 After effects 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksA car designed to sell to an automotive company[edit]1930 Ruxton Model C Roadster.While employed in the engineering department of the Budd Body Company of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Muller convinced his employer to invest in developing a front wheel drive prototype automobile. Budd would then sell the rights to the car to an automotive company which would contract with Budd for the body work
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Indianapolis Motor Speedway
Verizon IndyCar Series Indianapolis
Indianapolis
500-Mile Race Grand Prix of Indianapolis Monster Energy NASCAR
NASCAR
Cup Series Brantley Gilbert Big Machine Brickyard 400
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1925 Indianapolis 500
The 13th International 500-Mile Sweepstakes Race was held at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway
Indianapolis Motor Speedway
on Saturday, May 30, 1925. Race winner Peter DePaolo
Peter DePaolo
became the first driver to complete the 500 miles in under five hours, and have an average over 100 mph. Norman Batten drove 21 laps of relief (laps 106-127) while DePaolo had his hands bandaged due to blisters and bruises.Contents1 Time trials 2 Results 3 Race details 4 Gallery 5 ReferencesTime trials[edit] Four-lap (10 mile) qualifying runs were utilized. Leon Duray
Leon Duray
won the pole position with a 4-lap track record of 113.196 mph
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Menomonie, Wisconsin
Menomonie is a city in and the county seat of Dunn County in the western part of the U.S. state
U.S. state
of Wisconsin.[5] The city's population was 16,264 as of the 2010 census. Named for the historic Native American tribe, the Menominee,[6] inhabitants who pre-dated the state, the city forms the core of the United States Census
Census
Bureau's Menomonie Micropolitan Statistical Area, which includes all of Dunn County (2010 population: 43,857)
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Harry Miller (auto Racing)
A miller is a person who operates a mill, a machine to grind a cereal crop to make flour. Milling is among the oldest of human occupations. "Miller", "Milne", and other variants are common surnames,[1]:165 as are their equivalents in other languages around the world ("Melnyk" in Ukrainian, "Meunier" in French, "Müller" or "Mueller" in German, "Mulder" and "Molenaar" in Dutch, "Molnár" in Hungarian, "Molinero" in Spanish, "Molinaro" or "Molinari" in Italian etc.). Milling existed in hunter-gatherer communities, and later millers were important to the development of agriculture. The materials ground by millers are often foodstuffs and particularly grain. The physical grinding of the food allows for the easier digestion of its nutrients and saves wear on the teeth
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Buckinghamshire
Buckinghamshire
Buckinghamshire
(/ˈbʌkɪŋəmʃər/ or /-ʃɪər/), abbreviated Bucks,[1] is a county in South East England
England
which borders Greater London to the south east, Berkshire
Berkshire
to the south, Oxfordshire
Oxfordshire
to the west, Northamptonshire
Northamptonshire
to the north, Bedfordshire
Bedfordshire
to the north east and Hertfordshire
Hertfordshire
to the east. Buckinghamshire
Buckinghamshire
is one of the home counties and towns such as High Wycombe, Amersham, Chesham
Chesham
and the Chalfonts in the east and southeast of the county are parts of the London commuter belt, forming some of the most densely populated parts of the county. Development in this region is restricted by the Metropolitan Green Belt
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Princes Risborough
Princes Risborough
Princes Risborough
is an affluent small town in Buckinghamshire, England, about 9 miles south of Aylesbury
Aylesbury
and 8 miles north west of High Wycombe. Bledlow
Bledlow
lies to the west and Monks Risborough
Monks Risborough
to the east. It lies at the foot of the Chiltern Hills, at the north end of a gap or pass through the Chilterns, the south end of which is at West Wycombe
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Buckminster Fuller
Richard Buckminster "Bucky" Fuller (/ˈfʊlər/; July 12, 1895 – July 1, 1983)[1] was an American architect, systems theorist, author, designer, and inventor. Fuller published more than 30 books, coining or popularizing terms such as "Spaceship Earth", ephemeralization, and synergetic. He also developed numerous inventions, mainly architectural designs, and popularized the widely known geodesic dome. Carbon
Carbon
molecules known as fullerenes were later named by scientists for their structural and mathematical resemblance to geodesic spheres. Fuller was the second World President of Mensa from 1974 to 1983.[2]Guinea Pig B: I AM NOW CLOSE TO 88 and I am confident that the only thing important about me is that I am an average healthy human
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United Kingdom
The United Kingdom
United Kingdom
of Great Britain
Great Britain
and Northern Ireland, commonly known as the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
(UK)[15] or Britain,[note 11] is a sovereign country located off the north-western coast of the European mainland. The United Kingdom
United Kingdom
includes the island of Great Britain, the north-eastern part of the island of Ireland, and many smaller islands.[16] Northern Ireland
Northern Ireland
is the only part of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
that shares a land border with another sovereign state, the Republic of Ireland
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Alvis 12/50
The Alvis 12/50
Alvis 12/50
is a car introduced by British business Alvis Car and Engineering Company Ltd in 1923. It went through a series of versions, with the last ones being made in 1932. A range of factory bodies (made by Carbodies
Carbodies
and Cross & Ellis) could be specified in two- or four-seat form, with either open or closed bodies.Contents1 The subframe cars1.1 SA and SB 1.2 SC2 The 12/50 redesigned2.1 TE and TF 2.2 TG, TH and SD3 The post-vintage years3.1 TJ4 References 5 External linksThe subframe cars[edit] SA and SB[edit] The first 12/50s were produced in late 1923 for the 1924 model year. The cars from this first year of production were designated SA and SB. The SA had a 1496 cc 4-cylinder overhead valve engine in a chassis with a wheelbase of 108.5 in (2,756 mm), while the SB had a wheelbase of 112.5 in (2,858 mm)
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French Grand Prix
The French Grand Prix
French Grand Prix
(French: Grand Prix de France), formerly known as the Grand Prix de l'ACF, is a race held as part of the Fédération Internationale de l'Automobile's annual Formula One
Formula One
automobile racing championships. It is one of the oldest motor races in the world. It ceased shortly after its centenary in 2008 with 86 races having been held, a victim of finances and unfavourable venues. The race returned to the Formula One
Formula One
calendar in 2018 with Circuit Paul Ricard
Circuit Paul Ricard
hosting the race. Unusually even for a race of such longevity, the location of the Grand Prix has moved frequently with 16 different venues having been used over its life, a number only eclipsed by the Australian Grand Prix
Australian Grand Prix
of the older races
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Vanderbilt Cup
The Vanderbilt Cup
Vanderbilt Cup
was the first major trophy in American auto racing.Contents1 History 2 Trophies 3 Race winners 4 Revival trophy 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] An international event, it was founded by William Kissam Vanderbilt II in 1904 and first held on October 8 on a course set out in Nassau County on Long Island, New York.[1] The announcement that the race was to be held caused considerable controversy in New York, bringing a flood of legal actions in an attempt to stop the race. The politicians soon jumped in, holding public hearings on the issue. Vanderbilt prevailed and the inaugural race was run over a 30.24 miles (48.7 km) course of winding dirt roads through the Nassau County area. Vanderbilt put up a large cash prize hoping to encourage American manufacturers to get into racing, a sport already well organized in Europe that was yielding many factory improvements to motor vehicle technology
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