HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Fritz Kreisler
Friedrich "Fritz" Kreisler (February 2, 1875 – January 29, 1962) was an Austrian-born violinist and composer.[1] One of the most noted violin masters of his day, and regarded as one of the greatest violin masters of all time, he was known for his sweet tone and expressive phrasing. Like many great violinists of his generation, he produced a characteristic sound which was immediately recognizable as his own
[...More...]

"Fritz Kreisler" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Berlin Philharmonic
The Berlin
Berlin
Philharmonic (German: Berliner Philharmoniker) is a German orchestra based in Berlin. In 2006, ten European media outlets voted the Berlin
[...More...]

"Berlin Philharmonic" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

World War I
Allied victoryCentral Powers' victory on the Eastern Front nullified by defeat on the Western Front Fall of the German, Russian, Ottoman, and Austro-Hungarian empires Russian Civil War
Russian Civil War
and foundation of the Soviet Union Formation of new countries in Europe
Europe
and the Middle East Transfer of German colonies
German colonies
and regions of the former Ottoman Empire to other powers Establishment of the League of Nations
[...More...]

"World War I" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

String Quartet
A string quartet is a musical ensemble of four string players – two violin players, a viola player and a cellist – or a piece written to be performed by such a group. The string quartet is one of the most prominent chamber ensembles in classical music, with most major composers, from the mid 18th century onwards, writing string quartets. The string quartet was developed into its current form by the Austrian composer Joseph Haydn, with his works in the 1750s establishing the genre. Ever since Haydn's day the string quartet has been considered a prestigious form and represents one of the true tests of the composer's art. With four parts to play with, a composer working in anything like the classical key system has enough lines to fashion a full argument, but none to spare for padding. The closely related characters of the four instruments, moreover, while they cover in combination an ample compass of pitch, do not lend themselves to indulgence in purely colouristic effects
[...More...]

"String Quartet" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Arnold Rosé
Arnold Josef Rosé (born Rosenblum; 24 October 1863 – 25 August 1946) was a Romanian-born Austrian Jewish violinist. He was leader of the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra
Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra
for over half a century. He worked closely with Brahms. Gustav Mahler
Gustav Mahler
was his brother-in-law. Although not known internationally as a soloist he was a great orchestral leader (concertmaster) and player of chamber music, leading the famous Rosé Quartet
Rosé Quartet
for several decades.Contents1 Early life 2 Career in Vienna 3 Persecution and exile 4 Honours 5 See also 6 References 7 Bibliography 8 ReferencesEarly life[edit] Arnold Rosé
Arnold Rosé
was born in Iași
Iași
(Jassy) in what is now Romania. As he and his three brothers showed musical potential the family moved to Vienna, where his father established a thriving business as a carriage builder
[...More...]

"Arnold Rosé" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Army
An army (from Latin
Latin
arma "arms, weapons" via Old French
Old French
armée, "armed" (feminine)) or ground force is a fighting force that fights primarily on land. In the broadest sense, it is the land-based military branch, service branch or armed service of a nation or state. It may also include aviation assets by possessing an army aviation component. In certain nations, the term army refers to the entire armed forces of a nation (e.g., People's Liberation Army). Within a national military force, the word army may also mean a field army. They differ from army reserves who are activated only during such times as war or natural disasters. In several countries, the army is officially called the Land Army
Army
to differentiate it from an air force called the Air Army, notably France. In such countries, the word "army" on its own retains its connotation of a land force in common usage
[...More...]

"Army" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ludwig Van Beethoven
Ludwig van Beethoven
Ludwig van Beethoven
(/ˈlʊdvɪɡ væn ˈbeɪˌtoʊvən/ ( listen), /ˈbeɪtˌhoʊvən/; German: [ˈluːtvɪç fan ˈbeːtˌhoˑfn̩] ( listen); baptised 17 December 1770[1] – 26 March 1827) was a German composer and pianist. A crucial figure in the transition between the Classical and Romantic eras in Classical music, he remains one of the most famous and influential of all composers. His best-known compositions include 9 symphonies, 5 piano concertos, 1 violin concerto, 32 piano sonatas, 16 string quartets, his great Mass the Missa solemnis, and one opera, Fidelio. Born in Bonn, then the capital of the Electorate of Cologne
Electorate of Cologne
and part of the Holy Roman Empire, Beethoven displayed his musical talents at an early age and was taught by his father Johann van Beethoven
Johann van Beethoven
and by composer and conductor Christian Gottlob Neefe
[...More...]

"Ludwig Van Beethoven" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Arthur Nikisch
Arthur Nikisch
Arthur Nikisch
(12 October 1855 – 23 January 1922) was a Hungarian conductor who performed internationally, holding posts in Boston, London, Leipzig
Leipzig
and—most importantly—Berlin. He was considered an outstanding interpreter of the music of Bruckner, Tchaikovsky, Beethoven and Liszt. Johannes Brahms
Johannes Brahms
praised Nikisch's performance of his Fourth Symphony as "quite exemplary, it's impossible to hear it any better."Contents1 Biography 2 Death 3 Legacy 4 Notes 5 References 6 External linksBiography[edit]This section needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed
[...More...]

"Arthur Nikisch" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Violin Concerto No. 1 (Paganini)
The Violin Concerto No. 1, Op. 6, was composed by Niccolò Paganini
Niccolò Paganini
in Italy, probably between 1817 and 1818. The concerto reveals that Paganini's technical wizardry was fully developed. Contemporary audiences gasped at the extended passages of double-stop thirds, both chromatic and in harmonics.Contents1 Tonality1.1 D major
D major
arrangement 1.2 Leslie Howard's arrangement2 Instrumentation 3 Style 4 Structure 5 References 6 External linksTonality[edit] Paganini intended the Concerto to be heard in E-flat major: the orchestral parts were written in E-flat, and the solo part was written in D major
D major
with instructions for the violin to be tuned a semitone high (a technique known as scordatura) so that it would therefore sound in E-flat. This enables the soloist to achieve effects sounding in E-flat, which would not be possible with normal tuning
[...More...]

"Violin Concerto No. 1 (Paganini)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

World War II
Allied victoryCollapse of Nazi Germany Fall of Japanese and Italian Empires Dissolution of the League of Nations Creation of the United Nations Emergence of the United States
United States
and the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
as superpowers Beginning of the Cold War
Cold War
(more...)ParticipantsAllied Powers Axis PowersCommanders and leadersMain Allied leaders Joseph Stalin Franklin D
[...More...]

"World War II" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Jules Massenet
Jules Émile Frédéric Massenet (French: [ʒyl emil fʁedeʁik masnɛ]; 12 May 1842 – 13 August 1912) was a French composer of the Romantic era best known for his operas, of which he wrote more than thirty. The two most frequently staged are Manon
Manon
(1884) and Werther
Werther
(1892). He also composed oratorios, ballets, orchestral works, incidental music, piano pieces, songs and other music. While still a schoolboy, Massenet was admitted to France's principal music college, the Paris Conservatoire. There he studied under Ambroise Thomas, whom he greatly admired. After winning the country's top musical prize, the Prix de Rome, in 1863, he composed prolifically in many genres, but quickly became best known for his operas
[...More...]

"Jules Massenet" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Naturalized Citizen
Naturalization
Naturalization
(or naturalisation) is the legal act or process by which a non-citizen in a country may acquire citizenship or nationality of that country. It may be done by a statute, without any effort on the part of the individual, or it may involve an application and approval by legal authorities. The rules of naturalization vary from country to country and typically include a minimum legal residency requirement, and may specify other requirements such as knowledge of the national dominant language or culture, a promise to obey and uphold that country's laws. An oath or pledge of allegiance is also sometimes required
[...More...]

"Naturalized Citizen" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Walter Damrosch
Walter Johannes Damrosch (January 30, 1862 – December 22, 1950) was a German-born American conductor and composer.[1] He is best remembered today as long-time director of the New York Symphony Orchestra and for conducting the world premiere performances of George Gershwin's Piano Concerto in F (1925) and An American in Paris
An American in Paris
(1928). Damrosch was also instrumental in the founding of Carnegie Hall.[2]Contents1 Life and career 2 Criticism by Adorno 3 Importation of French musicians 4 Works 5 Notes 6 References 7 External linksLife and career[edit]This section needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed
[...More...]

"Walter Damrosch" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Carnegie Hall
Carnegie Hall
Carnegie Hall
(/kɑːrˈneɪɡi/[3] but more commonly /ˈkɑːrnɪɡi/[4]) is a concert venue in Midtown Manhattan
Midtown Manhattan
in New York City, United States, located at 881 Seventh Avenue, occupying the east side of Seventh Avenue between West 56th Street and West 57th Street, two blocks south of Central Park. Designed by architect William Burnet Tuthill and built by philanthropist Andrew Carnegie
Andrew Carnegie
in 1891, it is one of the most prestigious venues in the world for both classical music and popular music. Carnegie Hall
Carnegie Hall
has its own artistic programming, development, and marketing departments, and presents about 250 performances each season. It is also rented out to performing groups
[...More...]

"Carnegie Hall" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

The Bronx
The Bronx
The Bronx
(/brɒŋks/) is the northernmost of the five boroughs of New York City within the U.S. state
U.S. state
of New York. It is south of Westchester County; north and east of Manhattan, across the Harlem River; and north of Queens, across the East River. Since 1914, the borough has had the same boundaries as Bronx County, the third-most densely populated county in the United States.[2] The Bronx
The Bronx
has a land area of 42 square miles (109 km2) and a population of 1,471,160 in 2017.[1] Of the five boroughs, it has the fourth-largest area, fourth-highest population, and third-highest population density.[2] It is the only borough predominantly on the U.S. mainland. The Bronx
The Bronx
is divided by the Bronx River
Bronx River
into a hillier section in the west, and a flatter eastern section
[...More...]

"The Bronx" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Pastiche
A pastiche is a work of visual art, literature, theatre, or music that imitates the style or character of the work of one or more other artists.[1] Unlike parody, pastiche celebrates, rather than mocks, the work it imitates.[2] The word pastiche is a French cognate of the Italian noun pasticcio, which is a pâté or pie-filling mixed from diverse ingredients.[1][3] Metaphorically, pastiche and pasticcio describe works that are either composed by several authors, or that incorporate stylistic elements of other artists' work. Pastiche
Pastiche
is an example of eclecticism in art. Allusion
Allusion
is not pastiche. A literary allusion may refer to another work, but it does not reiterate it
[...More...]

"Pastiche" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.