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Franklin D. Roosevelt
Governor of New York GovernorshipPresident of the United States PresidencyFirst Term1932 campaignElection1st Inauguration First 100 daysNew Deal Glass-Steagall Act WPA Social Security SEC Fireside ChatsSecond Term1936 campaignElection2nd InaugurationSupreme Court Packing National Recovery Act 1937 Recession March of Dimes Pre-war foreign policyThird Term1940 campaignElection3rd InaugurationWorld War IIWorld War IIAttack on Pearl Harbor Infamy Speech Atlantic Charter Japanese Internment Tehran Conference United Nations D-DaySecond Bill of Rights G.I
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Alma Mater
Alma mater
Alma mater
(Latin: alma "nourishing/kind", mater "mother"; pl. [rarely used] almae matres) is an allegorical Latin
Latin
phrase for a university or college. In English, this is largely a U.S. usage referring to a school or university from which an individual has graduated or to a song or hymn associated with a school.[1] The phrase is variously translated as "nourishing mother", "nursing mother", or "fostering mother", suggesting that a school provides intellectual nourishment to its students.[2] Fine arts will often depict educational institutions using a robed woman as a visual metaphor. Before its current usage, Alma mater
Alma mater
was an honorific title for various Latin
Latin
mother goddesses, especially Ceres or Cybele,[3] and later in Catholicism for the Virgin Mary
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New York State Senate
Majority caucus (32)     Republican (31)      Democrat Caucusing with Republicans (1)Minority caucus (29)     Democratic (29)Vacant (2)     Vacant (2)Length of term2 yearsAuthority Article III, New York ConstitutionSalary $79,500/year + per diemElectionsLast electionNovember 8, 2016Next electionNovember 6, 2018Redistricting Legislative ControlMeeting placeState Senate Chamber New York State Capitol Albany, New YorkWebsiteNYSenate.govThe New York State Senate
New York State Senate
is the upper house of the New York State Legislature, the New York State Assembly
New York State Assembly
being the lower house. It has 63 members each elected to two-year terms.[1] There are no limits on the number of terms one may serve
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Bachelor Of Arts
A Bachelor of Arts (BA or AB, from the Latin
Latin
baccalaureus artium or artium baccalaureus) is a bachelor's degree awarded for an undergraduate course or program in either the liberal arts, sciences, or both. Bachelor of Arts programs generally take three to four years depending on the country, institution, and specific specializations, majors, or minors
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Cerebral Hemorrhage
Intracerebral hemorrhage
Intracerebral hemorrhage
(ICH), also known as cerebral bleed, is a type of intracranial bleed that occurs within the brain tissue or ventricles.[3] Symptoms can include headache, one-sided weakness, vomiting, seizures, decreased level of consciousness, and neck stiffness.[2] Often symptoms get worse over time.[1] Fever
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Harvard College
Harvard College
Harvard College
is the undergraduate liberal arts college of Harvard University. Founded in 1636 in Cambridge, Massachusetts, it is the oldest institution of higher learning in the United States[2] and one of the most prestigious in the world.[3]Contents1 History 2 Academics 3 House system 4 Athletics 5 Student organizations 6 Notable alumni 7 Fictional alumni 8 Footnotes 9 References 10 Further reading 11 External linksHistory[edit] Main article: History of Harvard UniversityView of the ancient buildings belonging to Harvard College, Cambridge, Mass., New York Public LibraryView of freshman dormitories in Harvard YardThe school came into existence in 1636 by vote of the Great and General Court (colonial legislature, second oldest in British America) of the Massachusetts
Massachusetts
Bay Colony—though without a single building, instructor, or student
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James E. Towner
James
James
is a common French and English surname and an English given name: James
James
(name), the typically masculine first name James James
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FDR (other)
FDR or Franklin D. Roosevelt
Franklin D

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Glass-Steagall Act
The Glass–Steagall
Glass–Steagall
legislation describes four provisions of the U.S.A Banking Act of 1933
Banking Act of 1933
separating commercial and investment banking.[1] The article 1933 Banking Act
1933 Banking Act
describes the entire law, including the legislative history of the provisions covered here. (The common name comes from the names of the Congressional sponsors, Senator Carter Glass
Carter Glass
and Representative Henry B
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U.S. Securities And Exchange Commission
The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission
U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission
(SEC) is an independent agency of the United States federal government. The SEC holds primary responsibility for enforcing the federal securities laws, proposing securities rules, and regulating the securities industry, the nation's stock and options exchanges, and other activities and organizations, including the electronic securities markets in the United States.[2] In addition to the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, which created it, the SEC enforces the Securities Act of 1933, the Trust Indenture Act of 1939, the Investment
Investment
Company Act of 1940, the Investment
Investment
Advisers Act of 1940, the Sarbanes–Oxley Act
Sarbanes–Oxley Act
of 2002, and other statutes
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Governor Of New York
See also:State Treasurer: abolished in 1926LegislatureState SenatePresident Kathy Hochul
Kathy Hochul
(D)Majority leader John J
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Gordon Woodbury
Gordon Woodbury
Gordon Woodbury
(1863–1924) was the United States Assistant Secretary of the Navy from 1920 to 1921. Biography[edit] Woodbury was born in New York City
New York City
in 1863 and raised in Bedford, New Hampshire. He was educated at Harvard University
Harvard University
and then returned to New Hampshire
New Hampshire
to pursue a career in politics. At one point, he was editor of the Manchester Union, the leading Democratic paper in New Hampshire. He was repeatedly elected to the New Hampshire
New Hampshire
General Court, but failed in his 1916 bid to become the member of the United States House of Representatives for New Hampshire's 1st congressional district, losing to Republican Cyrus A. Sulloway. In 1920, Franklin D. Roosevelt
Franklin D

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Warm Springs, Georgia
Warm Springs is a city in Meriwether County, Georgia, United States. The population was 478 at the 2010 census.Contents1 History 2 Geography 3 Demographics 4 Notable people 5 Gallery 6 References 7 Relevant literature 8 External linksHistory[edit] Warm Springs, originally named Bullochville (after the Bulloch family, the family of Martha Bulloch Roosevelt), first came to prominence in the 19th century as a spa town, because of its mineral springs which flow constantly at nearly 90 °F (32 °C). Residents of Georgia, particularly Savannah, began spending vacations at Bullochville in the late 18th century as a way to escape yellow fever, finding the number of warm springs in the vicinity of Bullochville very attractive. In the late 19th century traveling to the warm springs was attractive as a way to get away from Atlanta.[clarification needed] Traveling by railroad to Durand, they would then go to Bullochville
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Vice President Of The United States
The Vice President of the United States
United States
(informally referred to as VPOTUS, or Veep) is a constitutional officer in the legislative branch of the federal government of the United States
United States
as the President of the Senate under
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Beekman Winthrop
Beekman Winthrop
Beekman Winthrop
(September 18, 1874 – November 10, 1940) was an American lawyer, government official and banker. He served as Governor of Puerto Rico from 1904 to 1907, as Assistant Secretary of the Treasury in 1907-1909, and Assistant Secretary of the Navy
Assistant Secretary of the Navy
in 1909-1913.Contents1 Early life 2 Career 3 Later life 4 See also 5 References 6 Further reading 7 External linksEarly life[edit] The son of Robert Winthrop and Kate Wilson Taylor, Beekman "Beek" Winthrop came from a family of wealth and influence in New York
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Social Security (United States)
In the United States, Social Security is the commonly used term for the federal Old-Age, Survivors, and Disability Insurance (OASDI) program and is administered by the Social Security Administration.[1] The original Social Security Act
Social Security Act
was signed into law by President Franklin Roosevelt in 1935,[2] and the current version of the Act, as amended,[3] encompasses several social welfare and social insurance programs. Social Security is funded primarily through payroll taxes called Federal Insurance Contributions Act tax
Federal Insurance Contributions Act tax
(FICA) or Self Employed Contributions Act Tax (SECA)
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