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Frank Moss (lawyer)
Frank Moss (March 16, 1860 – June 5, 1920) was an American lawyer, reformer and author. He was involved in many of the reform movements in New York City
New York City
shortly before the start of the 20th century up until his death. As a longtime assistant to District Attorney Charles S. Whitman, he was involved in several high-profile criminal cases such as the Rosenthal murder trial in which police detective Charles Becker was found guilty of murder and executed.Contents1 Biography 2 Bibliography 3 Notes 4 References 5 Further readingBiography[edit] Frank Moss was born in Cold Spring, New York
Cold Spring, New York
in 1860 and moved to New York City as a child. Attending New York City
New York City
College, he became involved in "vice crusades" and other reform movements while studying to pass the bar
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Cold Spring, New York
Cold Spring is a village in the town of Philipstown in Putnam County, New York, United States. The population was 1,983 at the 2010 census.[2] It borders the smaller village of Nelsonville and Garrison. The central area of the village is on the National Register of Historic Places as the Cold Spring Historic District
Cold Spring Historic District
due to its many well-preserved 19th-century buildings, constructed to accommodate workers at the nearby West Point Foundry
West Point Foundry
(itself a Registered Historic Place today). The town is the birthplace of General Gouverneur K. Warren, who was an important figure in the Union Army
Union Army
during the Civil War. The village, located in the Hudson Highlands, sits at the deepest point of the Hudson River, directly across from West Point
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Political Boss
A boss, in politics, is a person who controls a unit of a political party,[clarification needed] although he/she may not hold political office. Numerous officeholders in that unit are subordinate to the single boss in party affairs. Each party in the same ward or city may have its own boss; that is, the Republican boss of Ward 7 controls Republican politics, while the Democratic boss controls the Democratic party there. Reformers sometimes allege that political bosses are likely guilty of corruption. Bosses may base their power on control of a large number of votes
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Seth Low
Seth Low
Seth Low
(January 18, 1850 – September 17, 1916) was an American educator and political figure who served as mayor of Brooklyn, as President of Columbia University, as diplomatic representative of the United States, and as 92nd Mayor of New York City
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William Travers Jerome
William Travers Jerome (April 18, 1859 in New York City – February 13, 1934) was an American lawyer and politician from New York.Contents1 Early life 2 Career 3 Personal life 4 Sources 5 External linksEarly life[edit] He was the son of Lawrence Jerome (1820–1888, Collector of the Port of Rochester, New York under President Millard Fillmore, NYC Alderman 1871) and Kate (Hall) Jerome. Financier Leonard Jerome was his uncle, Jennie Jerome was his first cousin, and U.K. Prime Minister Winston Churchill was his first cousin once removed. He attended Amherst College but left in 1881 without graduation. He studied law, was admitted to the bar in 1884, and commenced practice in New York City. Career[edit] From 1888 to 1890, he was a Deputy Assistant D.A. under John R. Fellows. From 1894 to 1895, he worked for the Lexow Committee. In 1894, he managed the successful campaign of William L. Strong for Mayor of New York City
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Red Light Districts
A red-light district is a part of an urban area where a concentration of prostitution and sex-oriented businesses, such as sex shops, strip clubs, and adult theaters are found
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Sexual Slavery
Sexual slavery
Sexual slavery
(sometimes known as sexual exploitation) is attaching the right of ownership over one or more persons with the intent of coercing or otherwise forcing them to engage in one or more sexual activities.[1][2] This includes forced labor, reducing a person to a servile status (including forced marriage) and sex trafficking persons, such as the sexual trafficking of children.[1] Sexual slavery
Sexual slavery
may also involve single-owner sexual slavery; ritual slavery, sometimes associated with certain religious practices, such as ritual servitude in Ghana, Togo
Togo
and Benin; slavery for primarily non-sexual purposes but where non-consensual sexual activity is common; or forced prostitution. Concubinage
Concubinage
was a traditional form of sexual slavery in many cultures, in which women spent their lives in sexual servitude
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Forced Prostitution
Forced prostitution, also known as involuntary prostitution, is prostitution or sexual slavery that takes place as a result of coercion by a third party. The terms "forced prostitution" or "enforced prostitution" appear in international and humanitarian conventions such as Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court[1] but have been insufficiently understood and inconsistently applied
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Political Machine
A political machine is a political group in which an authoritative boss or small group commands the support of a corps of supporters and businesses (usually campaign workers), who receive rewards for their efforts. The machine's power is based on the ability of the workers to get out the vote for their candidates on election day. Although these elements are common to most political parties and organizations, they are essential to political machines, which rely on hierarchy and rewards for political power, often enforced by a strong party whip structure. Machines sometimes have a political boss, often rely on patronage, the spoils system, "behind-the-scenes" control, and longstanding political ties within the structure of a representative democracy. Machines typically are organized on a permanent basis instead of a single election or event
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Herbert Parsons (New York Politician)
Herbert Parsons (October 28, 1869 – September 16, 1925) was a U.S. Representative from New York. Born in New York City, Parsons attended private schools in New York City, St. Paul's School, Concord, New Hampshire, Yale University, the University of Berlin, Harvard Law School, and was graduated from Yale University in 1890. He was admitted to the bar in 1894 and commenced practice in New York City. He served as member of the board of aldermen of New York City in 1900–1904. Parsons was married to Elsie Worthington Clews Parsons, an anthropologist and folklorist of the indigenous people of the American Southwest. They were married in Newport, Rhode Island on September 1, 1900.[1] He was elected as a Republican to the Fifty-ninth, Sixtieth, and Sixty-first Congresses (March 4, 1905 – March 3, 1911)
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New York County
Coordinates: 40°47′25″N 73°57′35″W / 40.79028°N 73.95972°W / 40.79028; -73.95972Manhattan New York CountyBorough of New York City County of New York StateView from Midtown Manhattan facing south toward Lower ManhattanFlagEtymology: Lenape: Manna-hata (island of many hills)Nickname(s): The City[1]Location of Manhattan, shown in red, in New York CityCoordinates: 40°43′42″N 73°59′39″W / 40.72833°N 73.99417°W / 40.72833; -73.99417Country  United StatesState  New YorkCounty New York (Coterminous)City  New YorkSettled 1624Government • Type Borough (New York City) • Borough President Gale Brewer
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Library Of Congress Control Number
The Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Control Number (LCCN) is a serially based system of numbering cataloging records in the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
in the United States. It has nothing to do with the contents of any book, and should not be confused with Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Classification.Contents1 History 2 Format 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] The LCCN numbering system has been in use since 1898, at which time the acronym LCCN originally stood for Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Card Number. It has also been called the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Catalog Card Number, among other names
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Lenox Avenue Gang
The Lenox Avenue Gang
Lenox Avenue Gang
was an early 20th-century New York City
New York City
street gang led by Harry Horowitz, and was one of the most violent gangs of the pre- Prohibition
Prohibition
era.[1]Contents1 History 2 References 3 Further reading 4 External linksHistory[edit] The Lenox Avenue Gang
Lenox Avenue Gang
was started in the early 1900s by Horowitz as an independent group of around twenty members. It consisted mostly of pickpockets and burglars, under Jack Zelig's Eastman Gang. Mainly operating around 125th Street, the gang generally committed muggings and robberies although they were occasionally hired out for murder by Zelig. Under Horowitz's leadership, the gang produced many of the top criminals of the early century, including Jacob Seidenschner, Louis Rosenberg, and Francesco Cirofisi
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Herman Rosenthal (gambler)
The Becker–Rosenthal trial was a 1912 trial for the murder of Herman Rosenthal by Charles Becker
Charles Becker
and members of the Lenox Avenue Gang.[1] The trial ran from October 7 to October 30, 1912, and restarted on May 2 to May 22, 1914
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Roosevelt Hospital
Mount Sinai St. Luke's and Mount Sinai West, the latter formerly known as Mount Sinai Roosevelt, are two hospitals affiliated with the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and the Mount Sinai Health System. The combined hospitals are a 1,000-bed, full-service community and tertiary care hospitals serving New York City’s Midtown West, Upper West Side and parts of Harlem. The two hospital components, which merged operations in 1979, are nearly 50 blocks apart on Manhattan's west side:Mount Sinai St
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New York Times
The New York Times
The New York Times
(sometimes abbreviated as The NYT or The Times) is an American newspaper based in New York City
New York City
with worldwide influence and readership.[6][7][8] Founded in 1851, the paper has won 122 Pulitzer Prizes, more than any other newspaper.[9][10] As of September 2016, it had the largest combined print-and-digital circulation of any daily newspaper in the United States.[11] The New York Times is ranked 18th in the world by circulation. The paper is owned by The New York Times
The New York Times
Company, which is publicly traded but primarily controlled by the Ochs-Sulzberger family through a dual-class share structure.[12] It has been owned by the family since 1896; A.G
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