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Frank Benson (actor)
Sir Francis "Frank" Robert Benson (4 November 1858 – 31 December 1939), commonly known as Frank Benson or F. R. Benson, was an English actor-manager. He founded his own company in 1883 and produced all but three of Shakespeare's plays.Contents1 Biography 2 Family 3 Filmography 4 Notes 5 References 6 External linksBiography[edit] Born in Tunbridge Wells, Benson was educated at Winchester and New College, Oxford, and at the university was distinguished both as an athlete (winning the Inter-university three miles) and as an amateur actor. In the latter respect he was notable for producing at Oxford the first performance of a Greek play, the Agamemnon, in which many Oxford men who afterwards became famous in other fields took part.[1] On leaving Oxford, Benson took to the professional stage, and made his first appearance at the Lyceum, under Henry Irving, in Romeo and Juliet, as Paris, in 1882
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Knight
A knight is a person granted an honorary title of knighthood by a monarch or other political leader for service to the monarch or country, especially in a military capacity. Historically, in Europe, knighthood was conferred upon mounted warriors.[1] During the High Middle Ages, knighthood was considered a class of lower nobility. By the Late Middle Ages, the rank had become associated with the ideals of chivalry, a code of conduct for the perfect courtly Christian warrior. Often, a knight was a vassal who served as a fighter for a lord, with payment in the form of land holdings.[2] The lords trusted the knights, who were skilled in battle on horseback. Knighthood
Knighthood
in the Middle Ages was closely linked with horsemanship (and especially the joust) from its origins in the 12th century until its final flowering as a fashion among the high nobility in the Duchy of Burgundy in the 15th century
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Public Domain
The legal term public domain refers to works whose exclusive intellectual property rights have expired,[1] have been forfeited,[2] have been expressly waived, or are inapplicable.[3] For example, the works of Shakespeare
Shakespeare
and Beethoven, and most early silent films are in the public domain either by virtue of their having been created before copyright existed, or by their copyright term having expired.[1] Some works are not covered by copyright, and are therefore in the public domain—among them the formulae of Newtonian physics, cooking recipes,[4] and all computer software created prior to 1974.[5]
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Julius Caesar (play)
The ghost of Caesar
Caesar
taunts Brutus about his imminent defeat. ( Copperplate engraving
Copperplate engraving
by Edward Scriven from a painting by Richard Westall: London, 1802.)The Tragedy of Julius Caesar
Julius Caesar
is a history play and tragedy by William Shakespeare, believed to have been written in 1599
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Theatre Royal, Drury Lane
The Theatre Royal, Drury Lane, commonly known as Drury Lane, is a West End theatre and Grade I listed building in Covent Garden, London, England. The building faces Catherine Street (earlier named Bridges or Brydges Street) and backs onto Drury Lane
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Hampshire
Hampshire
Hampshire
(/ˈhæmpʃər/, /-ʃɪər/ ( listen); abbreviated Hants)[a] is a county on the southern coast of England
England
in the United Kingdom. The county town of Hampshire
Hampshire
is Winchester, the former capital city of England.[1] Hampshire
Hampshire
is the most populous ceremonial county in the United Kingdom (excluding the metropolitan counties). Its the two largest settlements, Southampton
Southampton
and Portsmouth, are administered separately as unitary authorities. The rest of the area forms the administrative county, which is governed by Hampshire
Hampshire
County Council
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Royal Tunbridge Wells
Royal Tunbridge Wells
Tunbridge Wells
is a large affluent town in western Kent, England, around 40 miles (64 km) south-east of central London
London
by road and 34.5 miles (55.5 km) by rail.[2] The town is situated close to the border of Kent
Kent
with East Sussex, and is situated upon the northern edge of the High Weald, whose sandstone geology is exemplified by the rock formations at the Wellington Rocks and High Rocks. The town came into being as a spa in the Restoration and enjoyed its heyday as a tourist resort under Beau Nash when the Pantiles
Pantiles
and its chalybeate spring[3] attracted significant numbers of visitors who wished to take the waters
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Constance Benson
Gertrude Constance Benson (née Samwell; 26 February 1864 – 19 January 1946) was a British stage and film actress. Before her marriage to Frank Benson, she was known by the stage name Constance Featherstonhaugh /ˈfænʃɔː/. Born Gertrude Constance Cockburn Samwell in India, Benson became the wife of actor Frank Benson in 1886. They had two children, Eric William (1887-1916) and Byrnhild Lucy (b. 1888). After F. R. Benson's affair with the actress Genevieve Smeek (d. 1927), the couple separated. However, they did not divorce, and Constance (who had become Lady Benson in 1916) attended her husband's funeral as his widow, in 1940. Constance Benson worked in theatre for most of her career, but did appear in lead roles in four silent films, all of which were early film adaptations of William Shakespeare
William Shakespeare
plays
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William Arthur Smith Benson
William Arthur Smith Benson
William Arthur Smith Benson
(17 October 1854 – 5 July 1924) was an English designer active in the Arts and Crafts Movement. References[edit]Ian Hamerton (Hrsg.): W.A.S. Benson: Arts & Crafts Luminary and Pioneer of Modern Design. Antique Collectors' Club, 2005, ISBN 978-1-8514-9476-7. Caroline Dakers: The Holland Park Circle: Artists and Victorian Society. Yale University Press, 1999, ISBN 978-0-3000-8164-0. Charlotte Fiell, Peter Fiell (Hrsg.): 1000 Lights: 1878-1959, Band 1. Taschen Verlag, 2005, ISBN 978-3-8228-1606-6. Benson, William: Arthur Smith (1854-1924), metalwork designer. Page 60, John D. Culme in Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Suppl. 11. Missing persons from the beginning to 1985
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Godfrey Benson, 1st Baron Charnwood
Godfrey Rathbone Benson, 1st Baron Charnwood (6 November 1864 – 3 February 1945) was a British author, academic, Liberal politician and philanthropist. Benson was born in Alresford, Hampshire, the son of William Benson, a barrister, and Elizabeth Soulsby Smith. He was educated at Winchester and Balliol College, Oxford. He graduated in 1887, and would later become a philosophy lecturer at Balliol. He was involved in Liberal politics and represented Woodstock in the House of Commons from 1892 to 1895 and served as Mayor of Lichfield
Lichfield
between 1909 and 1911. In the latter year Benson was raised to the peerage as Baron Charnwood, of Castle Donington in the County of Leicester. Lord Charnwood was the author of many works, including two biographies, Abraham Lincoln
Abraham Lincoln
(1916) and Theodore Roosevelt
Theodore Roosevelt
(1923)
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Liberalism
Liberalism
Liberalism
is a political philosophy or worldview founded on ideas of liberty and equality.[1][2][3] Liberals espouse a wide array of views depending on their understanding of these principles, but generally they support ideas and programmes such as freedom of speech, freedom of the press, freedom of religion, free markets, civil rights, democratic societies, secular governments, gender equality and international cooperation.[4][5][6][7][8][9][10] Liberalism
Liberalism
first became a distinct political movement during the Age of Enlightenment, when it became popular among philosophers and economists in the Western world. Liberalism
Liberalism
rejected the prevailing social and political norms of hereditary privilege, state religion, absolute monarchy and the divine right of kings
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Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition
The Encyclopædia Britannica
Encyclopædia Britannica
Eleventh Edition (1910–11) is a 29-volume reference work, an edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica. It was developed during the encyclopaedia's transition from a British to an American publication. Some of its articles were written by the best-known scholars of the time. This edition of the encyclopedia, containing 40,000 entries, is now in the public domain; and many of its articles have been used as a basis for articles in.[1] However, the outdated nature of some of its content makes its use as a source for modern scholarship problematic
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George V Of The United Kingdom
George V
George V
(George Frederick Ernest Albert; 3 June 1865 – 20 January 1936) was King of the United Kingdom
King of the United Kingdom
and the British Dominions, and Emperor of India, from 6 May 1910 until his death in 1936. Born during the reign of his grandmother Queen Victoria, George was third in the line of succession behind his father, Albert Edward, Prince of Wales, and his own elder brother, Prince Albert Victor. From 1877 to 1891, George served in the Royal Navy, until the unexpected death of his elder brother in early 1892 put him directly in line for the throne. On the death of his grandmother in 1901, George's father became King-Emperor
King-Emperor
of the British Empire
British Empire
as Edward VII, and George was created Prince of Wales. He succeeded his father in 1910
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Digital Object Identifier
In computing, a Digital Object Identifier or DOI is a persistent identifier or handle used to uniquely identify objects, standardized by the International Organization for Standardization
International Organization for Standardization
(ISO).[1] An implementation of the Handle System,[2][3] DOIs are in wide use mainly to identify academic, professional, and government information, such as journal articles, research reports and data sets, and official publications though they also have been used to identify other types of information resources, such as commercial videos. A DOI aims to be "resolvable", usually to some form of access to the information object to which the DOI refers. This is achieved by binding the DOI to metadata about the object, such as a URL, indicating where the object can be found. Thus, by being actionable and interoperable, a DOI differs from identifiers such as ISBNs and ISRCs which aim only to uniquely identify their referents
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IMDb
IMDb, also known as Internet Movie Database, is an online database of information related to world films, television programs, home videos and video games, and internet streams, including cast, production crew, personnel and fictional character biographies, plot summaries, trivia, and fan reviews and ratings. An additional fan feature, message boards, was abandoned in February, 2017. The database is owned and operated by IMDb.com, Inc., a subsidiary of Amazon. As of December 2017[update], IMDb
IMDb
has approximately 4.7 million titles (including episodes) and 8.3 million personalities in its database,[2] as well as 83 million registered users. The movie and talent pages of IMDb
IMDb
are accessible to all internet users, but a registration process is necessary to contribute information to the site. Most data in the database is provided by volunteer contributors
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Library Of Congress Control Number
The Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Control Number (LCCN) is a serially based system of numbering cataloging records in the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
in the United States. It has nothing to do with the contents of any book, and should not be confused with Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Classification.Contents1 History 2 Format 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] The LCCN numbering system has been in use since 1898, at which time the acronym LCCN originally stood for Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Card Number. It has also been called the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Catalog Card Number, among other names
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