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Franciscan
The Franciscans
Franciscans
are a group of related mendicant religious orders within the Catholic
Catholic
Church, founded in 1209 by Francis of Assisi. These orders include the Order of Friars Minor, the Order of Saint Clare, and the Third Order
Third Order
of Saint Francis. These orders adhere to the teachings and spiritual disciplines of the founder and of his main associates and followers, such as Clare of Assisi, Anthony of Padua, and Elizabeth of Hungary, among many others.[2] Francis began preaching around 1207 and traveled to Rome
Rome
to seek approval from Pope Innocent III
Pope Innocent III
in 1209 to form a new religious order. The original Rule of Saint Francis approved by the Pope
Pope
disallowed ownership of property, requiring members of the order to beg for food while preaching
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Annuario Pontificio
The Annuario Pontificio
Annuario Pontificio
(Italian for Pontifical Yearbook) is the annual directory of the Holy See
Holy See
of the Catholic Church. It lists all the popes to date and all officials of the Holy See's departments. It also gives complete lists with contact information of the cardinals and Catholic bishops throughout the world, the dioceses (with statistics about each), the departments of the Roman Curia, the Holy See's diplomatic missions abroad, the embassies accredited to the Holy See, the headquarters of religious institutes (again with statistics on each), certain academic institutions, and other similar information. The index includes, along with all the names in the body of the book, those of all priests who have been granted the title of "Monsignor"
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Roman Catholic Diocese Of Assisi-Nocera Umbra-Gualdo Tadino
The Italian Catholic Diocese of Assisi-Nocera Umbra-Gualdo Tadino (Latin: Dioecesis Assisiensis-Nucerina-Tadinensis) in Umbria, has existed since 1986. In that year the historic Diocese of Assisi, known as the birthplace of Francis of Assisi, was combined with the Diocese of Nocera Umbra-Gualdo Tadino. The diocese is a suffragan of the Archdiocese of Perugia-Città della Pieve.[1][2]Contents1 History 2 Ordinaries2.1 Diocese of Assisi 2.2 Diocese of Assisi-Nocera Umbra-Gualdo Tadino3 ReferencesHistory[edit] The Gospel was first preached to the people of Assisi about the middle of the third century by St. Cyspolitus, Bishop of Bettona (ancient Vettona), who suffered martyrdom under the Emperor Maximian. About 235 St. Rufinus was appointed Bishop of Assisi by Pope Fabian; he suffered martyrdom about 236; and was succeeded by St. Victorinus. Both St. Victorinus and his immediate successor, St
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Poland
Coordinates: 52°N 20°E / 52°N 20°E / 52; 20 Republic
Republic
of Poland Rzeczpospolita
Rzeczpospolita
Polska  (Polish)FlagCoat of armsAnthem: "Mazurek Dąbro
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Latin
Latin
Latin
(Latin: lingua latīna, IPA: [ˈlɪŋɡʷa laˈtiːna]) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages. The Latin alphabet
Latin alphabet
is derived from the Etruscan and Greek alphabets, and ultimately from the Phoenician alphabet. Latin
Latin
was originally spoken in Latium, in the Italian Peninsula.[3] Through the power of the Roman Republic, it became the dominant language, initially in Italy and subsequently throughout the Roman Empire. Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
developed into the Romance languages, such as Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, French, and Romanian. Latin, Greek and French have contributed many words to the English language
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Jesus Christ
Jesus[e] (c. 4 BC – c. AD 30 / 33), also referred to as Jesus
Jesus
of Nazareth
Nazareth
and Jesus
Jesus
Christ,[f] was a first-century Jewish preacher and religious leader.[12] He is the central figure of Christianity
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Rule Of Saint Francis
Francis
Francis
may refer to:Contents1 People 2 Places 3 Other uses 4 See alsoPeople[edit]Pope Francis Francis
Francis
(given name), including a list of people and fictional characters
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Rome
Rome
Rome
(/roʊm/ ROHM; Italian: Roma i[ˈroːma]; Latin: Roma [ˈroːma]) is the capital of Italy
Italy
and a special comune (named Comune
Comune
di Roma Capitale). Rome
Rome
also serves as the capital of the Lazio
Lazio
region. With 2,874,558 residents in 1,285 km2 (496.1 sq mi),[1] it is also the country's most populated comune. It is the fourth-most populous city in the European Union
European Union
by population within city limits. It is the centre of the Metropolitan City of Rome, which has a population of 4.3 million residents.[2] Rome
Rome
is located in the central-western portion of the Italian Peninsula, within Lazio (Latium), along the shores of the Tiber
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Leper Colony
A leper colony, leprosarium, or lazar house is a place to quarantine people with leprosy (Hansen's disease). The term lazaretto can refer to quarantine sites, which were at some time also leper colonies.Contents1 History 2 Political aspects 3 See also 4 ReferencesHistory[edit]Abandoned nun's quarters at the leper colony on Chacachacare
Chacachacare
Island in Trinidad and Tobago.Leper colonies or houses became widespread in the Middle Ages, particularly in Europe
Europe
and India, and often run by monastic orders. Historically, leprosy has been greatly feared because it causes visible disfigurement and disability, was incurable, and was commonly believed to be highly contagious
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Peter Waldo
Peter Waldo, Valdo, Valdes, or Waldes (c. 1140 – c. 1205), also Pierre Vaudès or de Vaux, was a leader of the Waldensians, a Christian spiritual movement of the Middle Ages.Contents1 Relationship with Waldenses 2 Life and work 3 References 4 Sources4.1 Primary 4.2 Secondary5 Further readingRelationship with Waldenses[edit] Some authors have regarded Waldo as founder of the Waldensians.[citation needed] However, Eberhard of Béthune cited evidence showing that the name Waldenses appeared in documents (1170) more than 10 years before the major years of Waldo's activism. Bernard, abbot of Foncald, wrote about the heretics who were known as "Valdensis," who were condemned during the pontificate of Pope
Pope
Lucius II in 1144, decades before Peter Waldo. These extant citation sources document that the name Valdenses had been applied to religious groups before Peter Waldo's time. Life and work[edit] Most details of Waldo's life are unknown
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Evangelism
In Christianity, Evangelism
Evangelism
is the commitment to or act of publicly preaching of the Gospel
Gospel
with the intention of spreading the message and teachings of Jesus
Jesus
Christ. Christians who specialize in evangelism are often known as evangelists, whether they are in their home communities or living as missionaries in the field, although some Christian traditions refer to such people as missionaries in either case. Some Christian traditions consider evangelists to be in a leadership position; they may be found preaching to large meetings or in governance roles. Christian groups who encourage evangelism are sometimes known as evangelistic or evangelist
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Matthew 10
Matthew 10
Matthew 10
is the tenth chapter in the Gospel of Matthew
Gospel of Matthew
in the New Testament section of the Christian Bible. Matthew 10
Matthew 10
comes after Jesus had called some of his disciples and before the meeting with the disciples of John the Baptist. This section is also known as the Mission Discourse or the Little Commission, in contrast to the Great Commission (Matthew 28:18–20). The Little Commission is directed specifically to the Jewish believers of the early church, while the Great Commission
Great Commission
is to all nationalities
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Subiaco, Lazio
Subiaco is a town and comune in the Metropolitan City of Rome, in Lazio, central Italy, 40 kilometres (25 mi) from Tivoli alongside the river Aniene. It is mainly renowned as a tourist and religious resort for its sacred grotto (Sacro Speco), in the medieval St Benedict's Abbey, and for the Abbey of Santa Scolastica. At a time when several German monks had been assigned to the monastery, German printers established a printing press in the town. They printed the first books in Italy
Italy
in the late 15th century.Contents1 History 2 Main sights 3 People 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] Among the first ancient settlers in the area were the Aequi, an Italic people. In 304 BC they were conquered by the Romans, who introduced their civilization and took advantage of the waters of the Aniene river
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Matthew Paris
Matthew Paris, known as Matthew of Paris (Latin: Matthæus Parisiensis, lit. "Matthew the Parisian";[1] c. 1200 – 1259), was a Benedictine
Benedictine
monk, English chronicler, artist in illuminated manuscripts and cartographer, based at St Albans Abbey
St Albans Abbey
in Hertfordshire. He wrote a number of works, mostly historical, which he scribed and illuminated himself, typically in drawings partly coloured with watercolour washes, sometimes called "tinted drawings". Some were written in Latin, some in Anglo-Norman or French verse. His Chronica Majora
Chronica Majora
is an oft-cited source, though modern historians recognise that Paris was not always reliable
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Subsidiary
A subsidiary, subsidiary company or daughter company[1][2][3] is a company that is owned or controlled by another company, which is called the parent company, parent, or holding company.[4][5] The subsidiary can be a company, corporation, or limited liability company. In some cases it is a government or state-owned enterprise. In some cases, particularly in the music and book publishing industries, subsidiaries are referred to as imprints. In the United States railroad industry, an operating subsidiary is a company that is a subsidiary but operates with its own identity, locomotives and rolling stock
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Umbria
Umbria
Umbria
(/ˈʌmbriə/ UM-bree-ə; Italian pronunciation: [ˈumbrja]), is one of the twenty regions of Italy, located in central Italy. It is the only Italian region having neither a coastline nor a border with other countries. It includes the Lake Trasimeno, Marmore's Falls, and is crossed by the River Tiber. The regional capital is Perugia. Umbria
Umbria
is known for its landscapes, traditions, history, culinary delights, artistic legacy, and influence on culture. The region is characterized by hills, mountains, valleys and historical towns such as Perugia
Perugia
(known as an important university centre), Assisi
Assisi
(a World Heritage Site
World Heritage Site
associated with St
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