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François Villon
François Villon
François Villon
(pronounced [fʁɑ̃swa vijɔ̃] in modern French; in fifteenth-century French, [frɑnswɛ vilɔn]), born in Paris in 1431 and disappeared from view in 1463, is the best known French poet of the late Middle Ages
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Woodcut
Woodcut
Woodcut
is a relief printing technique in printmaking. An artist carves an image into the surface of a block of wood—typically with gouges—leaving the printing parts level with the surface while removing the non-printing parts. Areas that the artist cuts away carry no ink, while characters or images at surface level carry the ink to produce the print. The block is cut along the wood grain (unlike wood engraving, where the block is cut in the end-grain). The surface is covered with ink by rolling over the surface with an ink-covered roller (brayer), leaving ink upon the flat surface but not in the non-printing areas. Multiple colors can be printed by keying the paper to a frame around the woodblocks (using a different block for each color)
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National Library Of Sweden
The National Library of Sweden
Sweden
(Swedish: Kungliga biblioteket, KB, meaning "the Royal Library") is the national library of Sweden. As such it collects and preserves all domestic printed and audio-visual materials in Swedish, as well as content with Swedish association published abroad
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Barber-surgeon
The barber surgeon, one of the most common European medical practitioners of the Middle Ages, was generally charged with caring for soldiers during and after battle. In this era, surgery was seldom conducted by physicians, but instead by barbers, who, in having razors indispensable to their trade, were called upon for numerous tasks ranging from cutting hair to amputating limbs. In this period, surgical mortality was very high, due to blood loss and infection. Yet since doctors thought that blood letting treated illness, barbers also applied leeches
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See Of Orléans
The Roman Catholic Diocese of Orléans (Latin: Dioecesis Aurelianensis; French: Diocèse d'Orléans) is a diocese of the Latin Rite of the Roman Catholic Church in France. The diocese currently corresponds to the Départment of Loiret. The current bishop is Jacques André Blaquart, who was appointed in 2010. The diocese has experienced a number of transfers among different metropolitans. In 1622, the diocese was suffragan of the Archdiocese of Paris; previously the diocese had been a suffragan of the Archdiocese of Sens
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Cloister
A cloister (from Latin
Latin
claustrum, "enclosure") is a covered walk, open gallery, or open arcade running along the walls of buildings and forming a quadrangle or garth
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Place Du Châtelet
Place
Place
may refer to:Contents1 Surname 2 Geography 3 Society 4 Mathematics 5 Gambling 6 Arts 7 Miscellaneous 8 See alsoSurname[edit] Place
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Parlement
A parlement (French pronunciation: [paʁləmɑ̃] ( listen)), in the Ancien Régime of France, was a provincial appellate court. In 1789, France had 13 parlements, the most important of which was the Parlement
Parlement
of Paris. While the English word parliament derives from this French term, parlements were not legislative bodies. They consisted of a dozen or more appellate judges, or about 1,100 judges nationwide.[citation needed] They were the court of final appeal of the judicial system, and typically wielded much power over a wide range of subject matter, particularly taxation. Laws and edicts issued by the Crown were not official in their respective jurisdictions until the parlements gave their assent by publishing them
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Rabelais
François Rabelais
François Rabelais
(/ˌræbəˈleɪ/;[1] French: [fʁɑ̃swa ʁablɛ]; between 1483 and 1494 – 9 April 1553) was a French Renaissance writer, physician, Renaissance humanist, monk and Greek scholar. He has historically been regarded as a writer of fantasy, satire, the grotesque, bawdy jokes and songs. His best known work is Gargantua and Pantagruel. Because of his literary power and historical importance, Western literary critics consider him one of the great writers of world literature and among the creators of modern European writing.[2] His literary legacy is such that today, the word Rabelaisian has been coined as a descriptive inspired by his work and life
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Stephen Rodefer
Stephen Rodefer (November 20, 1940 – August 22, 2015) was an American poet and painter who lived in Paris and London.[2] Born in Bellaire, Ohio,[3] he knew many of the early beat and Black Mountain poets, including Allen Ginsberg, Gregory Corso, Charles Olson, and Robert Creeley
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Bohemianism
Bohemianism
Bohemianism
is the practice of an unconventional lifestyle, often in the company of like-minded people and with few permanent ties. It involves musical, artistic, literary or spiritual pursuits. In this context, Bohemians may or may not be wanderers, adventurers, or vagabonds. This use of the word bohemian first appeared in the English language in the nineteenth century to describe the non-traditional lifestyles of marginalized and impoverished artists, writers, journalists, musicians, and actors in major European cities.[1] Bohemians were associated with unorthodox or anti-establishment political or social viewpoints, which often were expressed through free love, frugality, and—in some cases—voluntary poverty
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Carpe Diem
Carpe diem
Carpe diem
is a Latin
Latin
aphorism, usually translated "seize the day", taken from book 1 of the Roman poet Horace's work Odes (23 BC).[1]Contents1 Translation 2 History2.1 Sources 2.2 In ancient literature3 Meaning3.1 Related expressions 3.2 Hebrew 3.3 Other Latin 3.4 Contemporary English 3.5 In popular culture4 See also 5 References 6 External linksTranslation[edit] Carpe is the second-person singular present active imperative of carpō "pick or pluck" used by Horace
Horace
to mean "enjoy, seize, use, make use of".[2] Diem is the accusative of dies "day". A more literal translation of carpe diem would thus be "pluck the day [as it is ripe]"—that is, enjoy the moment. History[edit] Sources[edit] Text from Odes 1.11:Tu ne quaesieris, scire nefas, quem mihi, quem tibi finem di dederint, Leuconoe, nec Babylonios temptaris numeros
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Memento Mori
Memento mori
Memento mori
(Latin: "remember that you have to die")[2] is the medieval Latin
Latin
Christian theory and practice of reflection on mortality, especially as a means of considering the vanity of earthly life and the transient nature of all earthly goods and pursuits. It is related to the ars moriendi ("The Art of Dying") and similar literature
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Danse Macabre
The Danse Macabre
Macabre
(from the French language), also called the Dance of Death, is an artistic genre of allegory of the Late Middle Ages
Late Middle Ages
on the universality of death: no matter one's station in life, the Dance Macabre
Macabre
unites all. The Danse Macabre
Macabre
consists of the dead or a personification of death summoning representatives from all walks of life to dance along to the grave, typically with a pope, emperor, king, child, and laborer
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André Malraux
André Malraux
André Malraux
DSO (French: [ɑ̃dʁe malʁo]; 3 November 1901 – 23 November 1976) was a French novelist, art theorist and Minister of Cultural Affairs. Malraux's novel La Condition Humaine (Man's Fate) (1933) won the Prix Goncourt. He was appointed by President Charles de Gaulle as Minister of Information (1945–46) and subsequently as France's first Minister of Cultural Affairs during de Gaulle's presidency (1959–69).Contents1 Early years 2 Career2.1 Early years 2.2 Indochina 2.3 The Asian novels 2.4 Searching for Lost Cities 2.5 Spanish Civil War 2.6 World War II 2.7 After the war 2.8 Legacy and honours3 Bibliography 4 Exhibitions 5 References 6 Further reading 7 External linksEarly years[edit] Malraux was born in Paris in 1901, the son of Fernand-Georges Malraux and Berthe Lamy (Malraux). His parents separated in 1905 and eventually divorced
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Pont Neuf
The Pont Neuf
Pont Neuf
(French pronunciation: ​[pɔ̃ nœf], "New Bridge") is the oldest standing bridge across the river Seine
Seine
in Paris, France. It stands by the western (downstream) point of the Île de la Cité, the island in the middle of the river that was, between 250 and 225 BC, the birthplace of Paris, then known as Lutetia, and during the medieval period, the heart of the city. The bridge is composed of two separate spans, one of five arches joining the left bank to the Île de la Cité, another of seven joining the island to the right bank. Old engraved maps of Paris
Paris
show how, when the bridge was built, it just grazed the downstream tip of the Île de la Cité; since then, the natural sandbar building of a mid-river island, aided by stone-faced embankments called quais, has extended the island
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